Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Thelen Lab

Professor Darryl Thelen teaches a lab session in Mechatronics lab

As an undergraduate working toward your bachelor’s degree, you will learn the science and engineering principles that apply to mechanical engineering systems.  Mechanical engineering is an incredibly broad area that includes mechanisms, energy systems, design and manufacturing.  An ME degree allows you access to technical areas that range from biomedical devices to renewable power systems to advanced manufacturing.  Because of the breadth of topics covered in the mechanical engineering curriculum there are a large selection of technical electives that can be taken your senior year.  Also, a variety of industry-sponsored projects form the basis of your year-long capstone design experience.  In addition to formal classes, you can join exciting student project teams that design and build things like robots, human-powered vehicles, and experimental cars.

Program Details

To learn more about the College of Engineering Admissions process please click here.

To apply to the University please click here.

Our department’s program in mechanical engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The undergraduate program in Mechanical Engineering has a long history of educational policy developments and continuous improvement of the undergraduate learning experience. The educational objectives for our graduates and the student outcomes for our curriculum have been periodically evaluated through ABET, a non-governmental, peer-review process that ensures educational programs meet established standards of quality.

In order to maintain accreditation status, engineering programs regularly assess and revise their educational objectives and student outcomes. The Mechanical Engineering undergraduate program has always been accredited, and our current Program Educational Objectives were adopted by the Department in 2006 and reaffirmed in 2010 as appropriate for our educational mission. The current Student Outcomes were adopted by the Department in 2010.

Accreditation helps students and their parents choose quality college programs. It enables employers to recruit graduates they know are well-prepared and graduate admissions committees to identify students who come from strong undergraduate programs. Professional registration, licensure, and certification boards use accreditations to screen applicants. Finally, accreditation gives colleges and universities a structured mechanism to assess, evaluate, and improve the quality of their programs.

ME Educational Objectives

Graduates from the Mechanical Engineering undergraduate program will choose to use the knowledge and skills they have acquired during their undergraduate years to pursue a wide variety of career and life goals.  We encourage this diversity of paths.

Independent of whether our graduates choose to pursue a professional career, postgraduate education, or volunteer service in engineering or a different field; we expect that our graduates will achieve the following objectives within three to five years after graduation:

    1. They will exhibit a fundamental understanding of broader engineering disciplines with strong skills in mechanical engineering, problem solving, leadership, teamwork, and communication.
    2. They will use these skills to contribute to their organizations and communities.
    3. They will make thoughtful, well-informed decisions in their career and life.
    4. They will demonstrate a continuing commitment to and interest in their own and other’s education.
 ME Student Outcomes

The Mechanical Engineering curriculum is designed so that, by the time of graduation, students will have developed the following attributes:

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) an ability to communicate effectively

(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

You can find information about our enrollment and degrees granted on our “About” page.

Scholarships

A large number of scholarships (50-80) are awarded by the Dept of ME each year. Any Mechanical Engineering student is eligible to apply. Scholarships in variable amounts are available to Mechanical Engineering undergraduate students. Many awards are based on academic merit and not on financial need. Visit Scholarships@UW-Madison to find and apply for scholarships.

 

Undergraduate research fellowships

Each semester students can apply for a fellowship to participate in cutting edge research.

 

Career services

You’re welcome to meet with Engineering Career Services staff for job search assistance. Join Engineering Career Services for access to job postings, resume referrals, and interviews.

 

Coops and Internships

For Coop and Internship information please visit Engineering Career Services.

 

Graduate School

For information on Master’s and PhD Degrees in Mechanical Engineering please click here.

 

Undergraduate Research Assistant Opportunities

Faculty often hire undergraduate students to work in their research labs with the pay coming from the Work Study program. Ask individual faculty about this opportunity.

 

Professional Societies 

Students are encouraged to join an engineering professional society. Student run chapters of professional societies for mechanical engineers include:

  • American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES)
  • American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE)
  • American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
  • American Society of Quality Control (ASQC)
  • Engineers for Environment and Technology (EET)
  • Pi Tau Sigma – ME Honor Society for Juniors & Seniors
  • Polygon Engineering Council
  • Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)
  • Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)
  • Society of Manufacturing Engineers
  • Students Uniting Business and Engineering (SUBE)
  • Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
  • Tau Beta Pi
  • National Society of Black Engineers-Wisconsin Black Engineering Student Society (NSBE-WBESS)

To view all student organizations, including those listed above please visit the Wisconsin Involvement Network (WIN) page.

For additional information, visit the Student Leadership Center.

 

Project and Independent Study Courses

To enroll in ME 291, ME 299, ME 491, ME 492, or ME 699, you must:

  • Have a 2.5 GPA or a 3.00 for the two preceding semesters
  • Find a consenting adviser (visit the Mechanical Engineering Student Services, 3182 Mechanical Engineering Building, for helpful suggestions).
  • Draw up a tentative title and outline for the study.
  • Decide on the number of credits (1-3 crs.).
  • File an adviser signed Independent Study Request form with the Student Services Office, 3182 Mechanical Engineering Building, that will allow you to Web register. (This should be done before the end of the second week of classes.)

 

Senior Thesis 

The ME Department’s Undergraduate Honors in Research Program allows students to participate in the creation of new knowledge and experience the excitement of the research process. Students in the program write and submit a senior thesis. Admission requirements include:

  • At least two semesters completed on the Madison campus with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5;
  • Majoring in Mechanical Engineering;
  • Approval of an appropriate professor who will serve as the thesis advisor.

The “Honors in Research” designation will be awarded to graduates who meet the following requirements:

  • Satisfaction of the requirements for an undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering;
  • A cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.3;
  • Completion of a total of at least 6 credits of ME 489.
  • Receive a final grade of at least “B” in ME 489.

Students must fill out the application for honors in research using this form and submit it to student services.

Advising

All Engineering students receive academic advising through departmental advisors.

For advising assistance, contact an advisor in the Student Services office, room 2107 Mechanical Engineering.

To schedule an advising appointment, please visit: https://calendar.wisc.edu/scheduling-assistant/.

You have been assigned a faculty advisor (see below), whom you are encouraged to see at any time during faculty office hours. However, any ME faculty member can advise you. The Department holds an Advising Day every fall to provide students with an opportunity to meet with a faculty advisor. You can also visit the Student Services Office, 2107 Mechanical Engineering Building where academic advisors can assist you. Print a current Degree Audit Reporting System report and bring it with you for advising purposes. You are encouraged to see your advisors about course selection, pre-requisite questions, technical and non-technical electives and career mentoring.

 

Student Advisors Location Phone Email
A-Ba THELEN, Darryl 3039 ME 262-1902 thelen@engr.wisc.edu
Bb-Bo PFOTENHAUER, John 1329 ERB 263-4082 pfot@engr.wisc.edu
Bp-C SURESH, Krishnan 2059 ME 262-3594 suresh@engr.wisc.edu
D-E SANDERS, Scott T. 113 ERB 262-3540 stsanders@wisc.edu
F-Gi LORENZ, Robert D. 2025 ME 262-5343 lorenz@engr.wisc.edu
Gj-Ha PLOEG, Heidi-Lynn 3043 ME 262-2690 ploeg@engr.wisc.edu
Hb-Hz GHANDHI, Jaal B. 125 ERB 263-1684 ghandhi@engr.wisc.edu
I-Kk CHEADLE, Michael J. 3035 ME 263-1590 mcheadle@wisc.edu
Kl-Lh OSSWALD, Tim 1059 ME 263-9538 osswald@engr.wisc.edu
Li-Ma BERSON, Arganthael 2246 ME 890-4646 berson2@wisc.edu
Mb-Mz RUTLAND, Christopher 1018B ERB 262-5853 rutland@engr.wisc.edu
N-O ZINN, Michael 2242 ME 263-2893 mzinn@wisc.edu
P-Rt ROWLANDS, Robert 3348 EH 262-3205 rowlands@engr.wisc.edu
Ru-Sc NELLIS, Gregory F. 1339 ERB 265-6626 gfnellis@engr.wisc.edu
Sci-St QIAN, Xiaoping 2051 ME 890-1925 qian@engr.wisc.edu
Su-Vh BOWER, Glenn B. M1060A ERC 263-7252 grbower@facstaff.wisc.edu
Vi-Wh MANNER, Kim 1250 ME 262-4825 kmanner@engr.wisc.edu
Wi-Z DRESSLER, Kristofer 1254 ME 262-2579 dressler@wisc.edu 

 

ME = Mechanical Engineering Building, 1513 University Avenue
ECB = 1550 Engineering Drive
ERB = Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive
EH = Engineering Hall, 1415 Engineering Drive

General advising concerning curriculum, registration and courses for all students will be done by the Mechanical Engineering Faculty. Students are urged to contact any of the faculty listed if they are unable to see their assigned advisor in a reasonable length of time.

 

 

Tutoring

The College of Engineering offers academic support services for mechanical engineering, physics, engineering mechanics, and other courses. Resources are available at the Undergraduate Learning Center for improving study skills and tutoring.

Pi Tau Sigma  Honorary Student Society offers free tutoring in physics, chemistry, calculus and all mechanical engineering required courses. Tutoring is located on the 4th floor of the Kurt F. Wendt Library on a first-come, first-served basis. One-on-one sessions can be arranged between tutors and students as necessary. One-on-one sessions can also be arranged by filling out a Tutoring Request form which can be obtained outside of the Student Services Office, 2107 Mechanical Engineering Building, and dropped off in the Pi Tau Sigma mailbox located in the ME lobby. Typical tutoring hours are from 7:00 – 9:00 pm, Sunday – Thursday and 9:00 – 10:00 pm, by appointment only. For further information on Pi Tau Sigma, tutoring or other Pi Tau Sigma activities, please visit their website at www.engr.wisc.edu/studentorgs/pitau.

 

Career services

You’re welcome to meet with Engineering Career Services staff for job search assistance. Join Engineering Career Services for access to job postings, resume referrals, and interviews.

 

Graduating?

Apply for graduation in the My UW Student Center in the My Academics tab.

 

Personal Counseling 

To help you identify reasons for poor academic performance, to help you develop better study habits, and to generally find ways to make your college education a more positive experience, you may want to contact the College of Engineering Counselor, David Lacocque, 333 East Campus Mall, Appointments: 608/265-5600. Office: 608/265-5480, Email: lacocque@uhs.wisc.edu. He will have counseling hours on Fridays, noon to 3:00 pm in Rm. M1080 ECB. Schedule an appointment ahead of time.

 

 

Resources: 

Computer labs

Computing (CAE)

Computing (DoIT)

Frequently Asked Questions 

 

The catalogs are also available in the ME Student Services Office or on the web:

 

Undergraduate Students Rules and Regulations
  • Admissions
    • Initial Classification
    • Degree-Granting Classification
    • Admission to Degree-Granting Classification
    • Transfer of Degree-Applicable Credits
    • Transfer of Grades
  • Registration 
    • Definitions
    • Credit Load Constraints
    • Student Responsibility for Scheduling
    • Adding Courses
    • Dropping Courses
    • Course Substitutions
    • Pass-Fail and Credit-No Credit Courses
    • Audited Courses
    • Courses Schedule for Less than 15 weeks
  • Performance and Evaluation 
    • Attendance
    • Grading Systems
    • Special-Purpose Grades
    • Course Grade Changes
    • GPA and Point-Credit Ration (PCR)
    • Dean’s Honor List
    • Repeating Courses
    • Incomplete
    • Resolution of an Incomplete
    • Final Exam Rescheduling
    • Withdrawal
    • Year Classification
    • Good Standing
    • Probation
    • Removal from Probation
    • Drop
    • Readmission
    • Session Actions
    • Graduation
    • Graduation with Distinction and Highest Distinction
  • Appeal

 

 Academic Integrity 
The Department of Mechanical Engineering takes Academic Integrity very seriously. According to state law, any instances of academic misconduct are reported to the UW Dean of Students. Once reported, the incident is retained in a permanent disciplinary file. This file may be released if you apply to graduate school, to medical school, to law school, for government clearance, for a visa, etc. As a result, even a minor infraction, such as plagiarism, copying a problem solution, or aid from an exam neighbor could have serious and permanent consequences.
For the full policy please visit this link.

 

Web Registration

The registration period typically starts in November for the Spring semester and in April for the Summer and Fall semesters. For more information on how to enroll in courses please visit the Registrar’s Office here.

 

 

Adding & Dropping Courses

You can add courses via the web (“My UW Madison” page) up to the end of the second week of the semester, and you can drop a course using the web up to the end of the ninth week. After these deadlines, you will need to get the proper authorization(s) using a course change form. Department approval may be obtained in the Student Services Office, 2107 Mechanical Engineering Building.

 

DARS Report

Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) reports can be ordered through the “My UW Madison” page and are sent to your e-mail account. A new DARS report should be printed every semester before registration begins. Use the DARS report and curriculum flowchart as a basis for selecting classes for the coming semester.

 

 

Transferring Courses and Credits 

For questions concerning the transfer of courses into the University of Wisconsin-Madison, please visit the Academic Advising page, visit ME Student Services, 2107 Mechanical Engineering Building, or call 262-0665,

 

Student Responsibility for Scheduling 

Each student is responsible for arranging a course list that will permit satisfactory progress towards degree requirements and a class schedule that:

  • avoids class and final exam scheduling conflicts and
  • avoids an excessively demanding final exam schedule and
  • verifies registration in chosen classes.