Watching gene-editing at work to develop precision therapies

University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have developed methods to observe genome editing in action—and they’re putting those capabilities to work to improve genetic engineering techniques. With support from a five-year, $1.8 million award from the National Institutes of Health, the new …

Focus on new faculty: Younghyun Kim keeps medical implants safe and secure

Implantable medical devices such as pacemakers are becoming smarter and smarter—and that gives physicians and patients unprecedented capabilities to track and monitor their health.

But the computational capabilities of implanted devices also leaves them vulnerable to malicious attacks—and in such …

Smart cancer therapies: Teaching the body’s own T-cells to attack tumors

University of Wisconsin–Madison engineers are manufacturing highly personalized cancer treatments that take advantage of a patient’s own cells to attack tumors.

These so-called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies have already shown tremendous potential in treating blood-based cancers such as …

Getting personal with pancreatic cancer

Oncologists are struggling to improve the grim survival rates of pancreatic cancer, which are especially frustrating in an era that is making good progress on other cancer fronts.

“I think everyone now understands that there’s got to be a better …