UW-Madison nuclear researchers receive $3 million in DOE grants

// Engineering Physics

Tags: Corradini, DOE, Faculty, grants, Mark Anderson, NEUP, nuclear engineering, research, Scarlat, Sridharan

The U.S. Department of Energy recently awarded more than $35 million through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) to support university-led nuclear energy research and development projects, including a total of about $3 million in grants for UW-Madison researchers.

Distinguished Research Professor Kumar Sridharan, Assistant Professor Raluca Scarlat and Research Professor Mark Anderson, all principle investigators in the UW-Madison engineering physics department. Photo: Gregory Vershbow
Distinguished Research Professor Kumar Sridharan, Assistant Professor Raluca Scarlat and Research Professor Mark Anderson, all principle investigators in the UW-Madison engineering physics department. Photo: Gregory Vershbow

Engineering Physics Distinguished Research Professor Kumar Sridharan received $800,000 for his proposal, “Tribological behavior of structural materials in high temperature helium gas-cooled reactor environments.”

Engineering Physics Assistant Professor Raluca Scarlat received $400,000 for her proposal, “Experimental and modeling investigation of overcooling transients that include freezing in fluoride-salt cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs).”

Engineering Physics Research Professor Mark Anderson received $799,856 for his proposal, “Enhancement of EM pump performance through modeling and testing.” Anderson also garnered $799,076 in DOE support for the proposal, “Sodium cooled fast reactor key modeling and analysis for commercial deployment.”

Anderson will also collaborate on a project led by Georgia Institute of Technology. The researchers will use both experimental and computational methods to test and model transient behavior of a mockup PCHE, which is a scaled down representation of the supercritical carbon dioxide cycle high temperature recuperator (HTR).

Additionally, Anderson and Wisconsin Distinguished Professor of Engineering Physics Michael Corradini will collaborate on a project led by Texas A&M University. The researchers aim to extend and enhance the experimental tests previously conducted using the existing water-cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) at Texas A&M University and UW-Madison, in close collaboration with the water-cooled Natural convection Shutdown heat-removal (NSTF) research team at Argonne National Laboratory.