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  5. Two UW-Madison faculty named to National Academy of Engineering

Two UW-Madison faculty named to National Academy of Engineering

Nicholas Abbott

Nicholas Abbott 

The National Academy of Engineering has named two University of Wisconsin-Madison professors to its 2014 class of members. 

Nicholas Abbott, the John T. and Magdalen L. Sobota Professor of chemical and biological engineering at UW-Madison, and Charles Mistretta, the J.R. Cameron Professor of medical physics, radiology and biomedical engineering at UW-Madison, are among 67 new members and 11 foreign associates elected to the NAE.

Election to the NAE is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. NAE recognized Abbott for his innovations and applications in soft-matter surface science, while it cited Mistretta for contributions to the development and application of angiographic methods in X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging.

Abbott earned his PhD in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991 and completed postdoctoral research in chemistry at Harvard University in 1993. His research focuses on the molecular-level design of soft materials that exhibit, for example, desirable interactions with biological systems. Other classes of soft materials he has designed change their properties in response to external fields and chemical stimuli. One area of application of Abbott's research involves the design of liquid crystalline materials that interact with their chemical environment, and as such, they offer the basis of new classes of chemical sensors. Materials emerging from his research also define functional surfaces that allow researchers to broadly control cellular and molecular interactions. Abbott holds 47 U.S. patents and is a fellow of the American Institute for the Advancement of Science.

Charles Mistretta

Charles Mistretta 

Mistretta earned his PhD in high-energy physics from Harvard University in 1968. His pioneering research in time-resolved angiography has led to significant improvements in the effectiveness, speed and image quality of such medical imaging techniques as magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computed tomography, and and interventional X-ray imaging. Mistretta is credited with leading the team that invented digital subtraction angiography in the 1980s, several new high-impact MRI techniques in the 1990s and more recently, a host of promising acquisition and iterative reconstruction techniques. His inventions have contributed to nearly $5 billion in sales of digital subtraction angiography equipment, while royalties from his inventions have contributed significantly to the UW-Madison research endowment. Mistretta holds 43 U.S. patents, with additional patents pending. He a fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. In 2013, the International Congress on Medical Physics named him among the 50 medical physicists who have had the most impact on the field in the past 50 years.

In addition, alumnus Roger Krieger (BSME '64, PhDME '68) was elected for his contributions to engine research, advanced engine technologies in passenger vehicles, and leadership in engineering education. Krieger retired from General Motors R&D as a group manager and had served as a mechanical engineering adjunct faculty member at UW-Madison, working with the Engine Research Center. And alumnus Ned Mohan (MSNE '72, PhDEE '73) was elected for his contributions to the integration of electronics into power systems and to innovations in power engineering education. Mohan is the Oscar A. Schott professor of power electronics and systems in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Minnesota.

Renee Meiller
2/6/2014