ME MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
FALL SEMESTER 1996 -- VOL. 1 / NO. 1
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON
A newsletter for alumni, students, and friends of the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dewane & Linehan Receive Distinguished Service Awards

"... and I thought I wanted to be a civil engineer, but I mistakenly signed up for mechanical engineering. My advisor said to wait a while before I corrected the error. Then, that first winter, I saw the civil engineering students doing surveying out in the cold and snow, and I decided to stay in ME."

John R. Dewane

Two ME alumni were honored with Distinguished Service Awards on Engineers Day, October 18. John R. Dewane, who earned his BS in 1957, and John H. Linehan, who received his PhD in 1968, were selected because of their contributions to the engineering profession, the College of Engineering, and society as a whole. Dewane is president of Honeywell's Space and Aviation Control division, which includes the space, military and commercial aviation markets. Linehan is chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Marquette University.

Dewane said that when he was a college freshman, he never intended to major in mechanical engineering. "I came to UW-Madison from Green Bay," he said at the awards luncheon, "and I thought I wanted to be a civil engineer, but I mistakenly signed up for mechanical engineering. My advisor said to wait a while before I corrected the error. Then, that first winter, I saw the civil engineering students doing surveying out in the cold and snow, and I decided to stay in ME."

John R. Dewane

John R. Dewane
(16K JPG)

Dewane joined Honeywell in 1960 and served in various fields and divisional marketing positions through 1970. From 1971 until 1985, he held positions in the systems and research center and aerospace and defense group. In 1985, he was named vice president of the commercial aviation division. Along the way, in 1973, Dewane earned a master's degree in business administration from the University of Minnesota.

When Honeywell acquired the Sperry Aerospace Group in 1986, Dewane was promoted to vice president and deputy general manager of the combined commercial aviation operation. Shortly thereafter, he became vice president and general manager of the air transport systems division and was promoted to group vice president of the newly reorganized military avionics systems group organization. In 1989, he became vice president of commercial flight systems group, and in 1993 he assumed his current position.

As the head of a fast-paced and competitive business, Dewane must make multi-million dollar decisions quickly. He credited his education for preparing him: first the general engineering education way of thinking is vital, he said, and secondly, two business courses, accounting and corporate strategy, proved invaluable. He said that when he put people with only a business background in charge of a product, they did well for a while but eventually failed.
John H. Linehan

John H. Linehan
(39K JPG)

In 1989, John Linehan became the founding chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Marquette University. It is now one of the most innovative such programs in the country. His studies of multi-phase flows in nuclear power safety systems with Argonne National Laboratory led to his first biomedical work, including developing a cryoprobe for curing bone tumors and an instrument for measuring esophageal pressures.

Linehan earned his BS degree in mechanical engineering from Marquette in 1960, his MS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1962, and his PhD from UW-Madison in 1968. His current research involves transport processes and micro-focal imaging in the lungs. He spoke highly of the educational foundations he received at UW-Madison. "They don't try to put you into a mold," he said. "Through the support and help of Professor Mohamed (Bill) M. El-Wakil (emeritus) I made the connection with Argonne. I appreciate all the faculty who helped me get where I am today."

In 1995, he was named Marquette's Rose Eannelli-Bagozzi Professor of Biomedical Engineering. He is a professor of medicine and physiology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a Founding Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers, and has served as president of the Biomedical Engineering Society.

His scientific focus since the 1970s has been on pulmonary circulation. He developed the chemical kinetics, bolus-sweep method to study the biology of endothelial cells in-vivo and the venous occlusion and the low viscosity bolus methods for identifying the locus of vasoconstriction in the lung. Recently, he was awarded a Keck Foundation grant to build a micro-focused X-ray system to image micro circulation in lungs and other organs. The use of these micro-focused images to measure the diameter and flow in small blood vessels is part of the developing functional imaging field, resulting in a Whitaker Foundation-funded PhD program.


ME Newsletter is a periodic publication of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Correspondence should be sent to the address below.

ME Newsletter
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1513 University Avenue
Madison, WI 53706-1572

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gawenda@engr.wisc.edu

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Last Modified: Monday, 24-Mar-1997 13:26:04 CST

FALL SEMESTER 1996 -- VOL. 1 / NO. 1 Contents