1994 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

DENICE D. DENTON
Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
The 1994 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

NOAH HERSHKOWITZ
Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics
The 1994 Byron Bird Award

RICHARD S. MARLEAU
Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
The 1994 Ragnar E. Onstad Award

SANDRA L. ARNN
Director, Engineering Career Services
1994 Bollinger Academic Staff Award

JOHN L. CLEASBY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GUENTHER E. FRANKENSTEIN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

LUTHER W. GRAEF
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DONALD L. HENDERSON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RAYMOND G. HERB
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RICHARD G. LIONE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

R. FENTON-MAY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROGER M. PASCH
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GERALD C. POMRANING
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

PETER P. TONG
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GARY C. VANIC
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DENICE D. DENTON

DENICE D. DENTON (Large image)

DENICE D. DENTON

When asked their opinion of Associate Professor Denice Denton, students commonly reply that she is the best teacher they have ever had inside or outside of engineering. Denton is this year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in teaching engineering students. She has a talent for making manageable material that is notoriously dreaded by students. The words "challenging" and "fun" appear time and again in student evaluations of her work.

Denton has distinguished herself as a role model for a balanced combination of excellent research, outstanding instruction and dedication to public service. Her research group focuses on solid state sensor design and the characterization of polymers used in microelectronics. Her interdisciplinary research group is comprised of seven graduate students from electrical and computer engineering, materials science and chemistry. Denton is the author or co-author of more than 50 publications in refereed journals and conference proceedings. She incorporates the results of her research into her classes whenever possible—a point appreciated and frequently noted by students.

In addition to guiding students at the college level, Denton is a national leader in K-12 precollege programs. She designed and developed the "Microfabrication Demonstration Kit"—a stand alone classroom teaching tool that is in use in more than 300 schools across the country. To supply the kits, Denton worked with colleagues to collect rejected wafers, masks and packaged parts from semiconductor manufacturers. In addition to frequent visits to local K-12 classrooms, she has traveled extensively to teach precollege teachers how to best use the kit.

Denton's teaching excellence has been widely recognized. She has been the recipient of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering's Professor of the Year Teaching Award, the Polygon Outstanding Instructor Award, the UW-Madison W.H. Kiekhofer Distinguished Teaching Award, the UW-Madison Top 100 Educators Award and the IEEE Professor of the Year Award among others.

Denton earned her BS, MS and PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined the faculty of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in 1987.

NOAH HERSHKOWITZ

NOAH HERSHKOWITZ (Large image)

NOAH HERSHKOWITZ

Noah Hershkowitz is this year's recipient of the Byron Bird Award for excellence in a research publication. In a series of 10 papers from 1978 to 1985, Hershkowitz captured the essence of an elusive scientific phenomena known as double layers in plasmas.

Double layers are the regions in a plasma where two sheets of opposite electrical charge are located side by side. They appear in a variety of situations in which there are high electric fields or currents. They are believed to be the source of energy to electrons which produce Aurora, and space phenomena such as solar flares and intergalactic radio signals. They are recognized as a fundamental phenomena in plasmas ranging from astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, and plasmas used in industrial applications.

Double layers had been conjectured and some early experimental results suggested that they exist in nature, but the early experiments were not convincing. Researchers were skeptical that the results seen had anything to do with possible double layers in space plasmas.

Hershkowitz convinced the skeptics. He made detailed measurements of double layers over a wide range of conditions. With the earliest papers of his series on laboratory double layers, he changed the space and plasma communities, dispelling many doubts about the existence of the layers. His work launched a wave of experimental research and accelerated the pace of theoretical research.

His tenth paper summarizes his early results in depth and gives an overall, integrated view of the field. This paper has become a standard reference and is heavily cited. Although Hershkowitz was not alone in "solving" the phenomena, he and his publications have been a catalyst, bringing together experiment and theory from two diverse communities. Based on his work and the work of many others, a major NASA and ESA effort focuses on measuring double-layer-like structures above the poles of the earth with specially designed satellites.

Hershkowitz earned his BS in physics from Union College-Schenectady in 1962 and a PhD in physics from Johns Hopkins University in 1966. He was professor of physics at the University of Iowa from 1967 to 1980. He joined the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics in 1981. In 1989, he was named Irving Langmuir Professor.

RICHARD S. MARLEAU

RICHARD S. MARLEAU (Large image)

RICHARD S. MARLEAU

The 1994 Ragnar E. Onstad Award to Society Award is presented to Richard S. Marleau, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, for his efforts in developing higher education in third-world countries.

Marleau has worked on projects in Indonesia, Singapore, China and Pakistan through the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, UNESCO and USAID.

While in Hangzhou, China in 1982, Marleau spent two weeks of his own time presenting an entire course (ECE 468) including an additional 30 to 60 minute question and answer period each day. His work resulted in the improvement of an automated lens-grinding process and the development of a new course at Zheshiang University, based on the course he had presented.

From 1977 to 1982, Marleau served as a consultant to the Surabaya Technological Institute in Indonesia. He worked with the institute's staff to develop the computer engineering curriculum and establish a computer center. Through his efforts, the quality of teaching, research and public service were greatly enhanced.

In 1989, Marleau assisted USAID in planning an $80 million grant program in Pakistan to establish technological centers of excellence that now bring the advances of modern science to the masses. The evaluation team depended on Marleau's understanding of the intricacies of science education. His ability to secure the confidence of the Pakistani scientists enabled the team to gain a comprehensive and accurately detailed picture of the university's needs. His guidance to the University of Engineering and Technology in Lahore, enabled it to become one of the first institutions to take part in the aid program.

Marleau's community service activities also include serving meals and providing aid to Madison's homeless.

Marleau earned his BS and MS in electrical engineering from the University of Toledo in 1958 and 1960. He was first appointed to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering as an instructor in 1960. He was named assistant professor in 1967, the same year he earned his PhD, and associate professor in 1973. Marleau is a licensed professional engineer in Wisconsin and has served on the Wisconsin professional engineering board.

SANDRA L. ARNN

SANDRA L. ARNN (Large image)

SANDRA L. ARNN

The selection committee has named Sandra Arnn as the 1994 winner of the Bollinger Academic Staff Distinguished Achievement Award. Under her leadership, the Engineering Career Services program is continuously improving to better meet the needs of students and employers.

Many of Arnn's accomplishments stem from her emphasis on service. She implemented a computer system that improved access to current student data and enabled her office to customize information for employers. Her office alleviated student frustration and made better use of staff time by revising the ECS registration system. More than 500 students now register for services in a matter of hours instead of weeks. In good economic times, her office arranges and oversees nearly 8,000 student interviews during an academic year.

Recognizing that industry does not operate by semesters, Arnn instituted a "just in time" recruiting policy that accommodates employers' engineering needs throughout the year. As a result of her drive to make Engineering Career Services a place where customer needs are anticipated and met, the college is viewed by hundreds of employers as a flexible and customer-oriented institution.

In recent years, as large employers reduced recruitment on campuses across the country, Arnn moved quickly to add to an already well-developed base of small- and medium-sized employers, including many in Wisconsin. As a result of her efforts, more than 150 new companies have requested UW-Madison engineering candidates during the past three years. She takes pride that her program offers the same high quality services to all employers—regardless of size.

Despite the pressures of serving an entire college of students, Arnn delivers individualized attention. Her appointment schedule and record of drop-ins are testimony to her constant care to address student, faculty and employer concerns. She personally presents student resumes to appropriate employers at state, regional and national conferences. She visits companies and governmental agencies inside and outside of the state in an effort to keep Wisconsin engineers at the top of "key school" recruiting lists.

Arnn came to the College of Engineering in 1982. She earned an honors BA in French and sociology in 1966 and an honors MSSW in 1978, both from UW-Madison.

JOHN L. CLEASBY

JOHN L. CLEASBY (Large image)

JOHN L. CLEASBY

Clean drinking water will be John Cleasby's legacy. Few people can claim to have done as much to protect one of our nation's most valuable natural resources. Cleasby has provided leadership in solving national and international problems in water and wastewater filtration, water purification processes and treatment plant design.

Cleasby earned both his BS (1950) and MS (1951) in civil and environmental engineering from UW-Madison. He applied his skills as an inspection engineer with the Standard Oil Company from 1951-52 and as a project engineer for the Chicago engineering firm of Consoer, Townsend and Associates from 1952-54. In 1960, he earned his PhD from Iowa State University where he is professor emeritus of civil engineering. The university awarded him its highest honor by naming him a Distinguished Professor in Engineering.

Cleasby has an impressive record of government service both in the United States and abroad. He has served as a member of the Iowa State Department of Health, chair of a committee for the President's Council on Environmental Quality, and consultant to the Environmental Protection Agency, World Health Organization and World Bank. He has taught courses on water treatment methods in China, Brazil, Turkey, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay and Argentina among others.

Over the last 40 years, Cleasby has been honored by his peers with membership in the National Academy of Engineering, five prestigious national awards from the American Waterworks Association and six national awards from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). He has the distinction of being a three-time winner of the Rudolph Hering Medal, which is awarded by ASCE for the best paper on environmental engineering. His neighbors, the taxpayers of Ames, Iowa, think fondly of Cleasby as the professor who, in 1989, saved their city $900,000 on the Ames water pollution control plant.

Cleasby and his wife, Donna Haugh, have raised three children.

GUENTHER E. FRANKENSTEIN

GUENTHER E. FRANKENSTEIN (Large image)

GUENTHER E. FRANKENSTEIN

Guenther Frankenstein's distinguished and tireless service has contributed greatly to cold regions and ice engineering from the Arctic and Antarctic to Wisconsin.

Frankenstein earned a BS in forestry in 1953 and an MS in civil engineering in 1961 from Michigan Technological University. As a licensed professional engineer, he has a unique combination of practical field experience and dedication to teaching.

Through the Ice Engineering Research Facility at the U.S. Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory in Hanover, New Hampshire, he has provided personnel, material, equipment, funds, expertise and intellectual support to the University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute. He has also served as a reviewer of Sea Grant proposals, monographs, videotapes and technical reports regarding ice engineering for small-craft harbors.

Frankenstein has lectured at more than 40 UW seminars and workshops for engineers and contractors dealing with ice engineering, docks and marinas, and floating structures. He has represented the U.S. in several international technical organizations. His career includes 36 years as branch chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

During his many years of public service, Frankenstein pioneered methods for crossing ice-covered rivers and lakes with heavy vehicles. He developed a unique ice hydraulics laboratory that has become a national asset and led the development of river ice management technology for inland waterways. His cold regions engineering skill was integral in recovering the remains of U.S. servicemen after a tragic air crash in Gander, Newfoundland.

His dedication reaches far beyond his profession. Frankenstein worked for 20 years with youth and community action programs in New Hampshire and Vermont. His selfless community dedication includes coaching youth ski teams, serving as a guardian of several fatherless young men and tutoring dyslexic students in math and science.

Frankenstein and his wife Ute are avid skiers and have raised three daughters.

LUTHER W. GRAEF

LUTHER W. GRAEF (Large image)

LUTHER W. GRAEF

Luther Graef joined the ranks of the most important and influential engineers in the profession by combining his education, experience and initiative to create jobs.

In 1961, he and three partners founded the consulting engineering firm of Graef, Anhalt, Schloemer and Associates Inc. Graef established the standards of quality that enabled the firm to grow to its present size of over 200 employees.

Graef earned his BS in civil engineering from Marquette University in 1952. From 1953-56 he served in the U.S. Army and from 1956-61 he worked as a design and project engineer for Charles Yoder & Associates. Graef earned his MS in civil engineering from UW-Milwaukee in 1961.

Under Graef s leadership as president and chairman of the board, his company maintains the highest quality of professional services while employing the latest technical tools. He guides his staff by encouraging continuing education and by setting an example for professional and technical society activity. In 1990, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) presented his company with the ASCE Employer Recognition Award for support of younger members.

As a professional engineer, Graef has received special recognition from numerous sources. The Wisconsin Section of the American Society of Professional Engineers presented him with the Outstanding Professional Engineer in Private Practice Award in 1976 and the Engineer of the Year Award in 1983. Graef has served on the industrial advisory committee of several UW schools including the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW-Madison.

Graef makes time to be a civic leader as well. He served five terms as chairman of the city of Milwaukee's Board of Assessment, is active in the leadership of Redeemer Lutheran Church and for 26 years served as counselor and scouting leadership the Milwaukee County council of the Boy Scouts of America.

DONALD L. HENDERSON

DONALD L. HENDERSON (Large image)

DONALD L. HENDERSON

Donald Henderson joined John Deere in 1967 to combine his engineering skills with his fondness for agricultural tractors. Through professional expertise and commitment to excellence, he has made many valuable contributions to products used worldwide, including four patents.

Henderson joined the U.S. Army after earning a BS in agricultural engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1959. He returned to UW-Madison and earned a BS in mechanical engineering in 1964 and an MS in agricultural engineering in 1965.

Henderson taught engineering students in Nigeria as member of the Colorado State University/U.S. Agency for International Development-Foreign Aid Team. He returned to the U.S. in 1967 and joined John Deere as a product design engineer. His initial responsibilities involved creating, developing and evaluating agricultural steering, braking and hydraulic lifting systems.

His responsibilities increased in the 1970's as he moved into management. His diverse experience has included managing reliability engineering for agricultural tractors, four-wheel-drive agricultural product support, and tractor manufacturing and assembly operations.

In the 1980's, Henderson took responsibility for worldwide tractor reliability and later became division manager for worldwide four-wheel-drive agricultural tractor engineering. In 1986, he accepted the position of manager of engineering for the John Deere Horicon Works. In 1993, he was appointed general manager of worldwide lawn and grounds care engineering. Henderson leads a talented team in developing a varied product line. The products, made in eight factories in four countries, range from walk-behind mowers to compact tractors.

Henderson has also dedicated time to community service. He is currently a member of the Beaver Dam Hospital Board of Directors and serves as administrative council chair for his church. He has received the district award of merit for his support of the Boy Scouts of America and was recognized by the Iowa Engineering Society with the 1986 Community Service Award.

Henderson and his wife Emily have four children.

RAYMOND G. HERB

RAYMOND G. HERB (Large image)

RAYMOND G. HERB

In 1931, Raymond Herb read Robert Van de Graaf's first paper describing the electrostatic generator which came to be known as the "Van de Graaf accelerator." As a physicist and entrepreneur, Herb engineered many novel concepts and modifications to this accelerator, making his own accelerators the workhorses of nuclear science and more recently, materials science. Herb's engineering innovations provide the engineering community with some of its most powerful analysis techniques.

Herb earned a BS in physics in 1931 and a PhD in physics in 1935, both from UW-Madison. From 1935 to 1945, he worked his way from research associate in UW-Madison's physics department to professor of physics. In 1961, he was named the Charles Mendenhall Professor of Physics.

Herb's honors include honorary degrees from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; the University of Basel, Switzerland; UW-Madison and Lund University in Sweden. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a member of the National Academy of Science. In 1976, Herb was awarded his first UW-Madison College of Engineering Distinguished Service Award by Dean Bob Marshall. He was nominated by the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics. He is the first to receive two COE Distinguished Service Awards.

In 1965, Herb founded National Electrostatics Corporation. Since then, his company has built and installed more than 115 Pelletron® accelerators worldwide. The company employs 92 people and builds five to 10 machines a year, worth $500,000 to $10 million each.

Herb's accelerators were originally used primarily for nuclear structure research. This application resulted in the world's largest electrostatic accelerator—Oak Ridge National Laboratory's 25-million-volt tandem Pelletron®. It holds the world's record for the highest sustained potential difference at 32 million volts. The technology used to build these accelerators has been applied to instruments for materials modification and analysis. These instruments produce ion beams in the millions of electron volts for materials analysis in biomedicine, environmental science, computer chip technology, art, archaeology and chemistry.

Herb and his wife Anne have raised five children.

RICHARD G. LIONE

RICHARD G. LIONELarge image)

RICHARD G. LIONE

Richard Lione is a metallurgical engineer and lawyer who excels in the field of intellectual property law. His discipline combines engineering principles and the patent, trade secret, trademark and copyright laws of the world.

As a senior partner of the Midwest's largest intellectual property law firm, Lione has represented a wide spectrum of clients in diverse technologies including robotics, machine tools, aircraft instrumentation, textile machinery, medical devices, food chemistry packaging machinery and electrical connectors. In a practice now focused heavily on litigation, he has been lead counsel in trials involving all areas intellectual property law, with an emphasis on patent law.

His effectiveness as a patent attorney stems from the knowledge and training he obtained while earning his engineering degree from UW-Madison. Lione earned his BS in metallurgical engineering in 1954 and a JD from George Washington University in 1959. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1954-56.

Lione has been active in both fund raising and promoting the image of the College of Engineering in the Chicago area. He currently serves as chair of the Chicago Area COE Committee. He is also an active member of the Chicago and American Bar Associations, the Licensing Executives Society, the International Federation of Industrial Property Counsel and the International Intellectual Property Law Association.

In addition to fulfilling obligations in many other professional societies, Lione served as a board member and president of the Chicago Shakespeare Company from 1982 to 1992. He is an active member of Lawyers for the Creative Arts, a volunteer organization that provides free legal services to non-profit arts organizations. He is an avid pilot owning and operating a light twin for both business and pleasure. From 1970 to 1975, Lione flew his Pitts biplane in sport aerobatic competition.

Lione and his wife Barbara have a daughter and two grandchildren.

R. FENTON-MAY

R. FENTON-MAY (Large image)

R. FENTON-MAY

As director of operations development for The Coca-Cola Company, R. Fenton-May is one of the few people who could actually "buy the world a Coke." As director, he manages resources for the start up or transition of new Coca-Cola manufacturing and distribution operations worldwide.

Fenton-May was born in London. He went to high school in Zimbabwe, earned his undergraduate degree in chemical engineering in Scotland and a PhD in chemical engineering from UW-Madison in 1971. His doctoral thesis is titled "Use of Reverse Osmosis and Ultrafiltration in the Processing of Cheese Whey."

After earning his PhD, May went to work for Coca-Cola in various research and administrative positions. In 1976, he was promoted to manager of corporate quality assurance to oversee quality assurance worldwide. Four years later, Fenton-May was made vice president and technical manager of Coca Cola Central Pacific in Hong Kong. He managed a team which built 15 new bottling plants and expanded 29 others throughout Southeast Asia. At the same time, the team developed the associated infrastructure for packaging and other necessary support industries for the growth of the soft drink industry in East Asia.

In 1986, Fenton-May became president of Coca-Cola China Ltd. and was responsible for managing development of the company's business in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macao. His team developed a China-wide infrastructure to take the company's business in China from four to 13 bottling operations, including eight joint ventures, producing 100 million cases of soft drinks per year. He returned to Atlanta in 1993 to assume his current position.

In his free time, Fenton-May enjoys exploring soft drink technology, playing bridge, traveling and the outdoors, model railroads and classical music.

ROGER M. PASCH

ROGER M. PASCH (Large image)

ROGER M. PASCH

Roger Pasch's contributions to the engineering community and the College of Engineering are long standing and significant. In particular, he has served with distinction on the mechanical engineering department's Board of Visitors. For the past two years, he has served as chairperson. In addition, Pasch frequently interacts with department faculty and students, providing ideas for team and individual projects and serving as a technical information resource.

Pasch graduated from UW-Madison with a BS in mechanical engineering in 1969. He earned an MBA from the University of Chicago in 1984. He joined the Research Products Corporation in 1962 as a laboratory technician. He has been vice president of engineering since 1982.

Through his commitment to continuous improvement, he has made valuable contributions to the fields of air filtration, humidification and evaporative cooling. Throughout his career at Research Products Corporation he has held a series of positions of increasing responsibility and impact. He is widely recognized for his leadership skills which have led to many new commercial products. Pasch serves a critical role on the corporation's team in formulating long-term strategy, establishing operating policies and guiding the day to day operation of Research Products Corporation.

For example, in the last 12 years, Pasch has guided more than two dozen new product designs from concept through production, implemented many major redesigns for cost reduction, eased manufacturability and improved customer satisfaction. He achieved this by working with interdepartmental design teams to speed design time and ensure ease in transferring designs to production.

As a registered professional engineer, Pasch has been active in many professional and community activities. He holds three patents, has written numerous technical papers and has lectured on technical and quality improvement subjects. He has served on many national, technical and industry committees, as well as the board of directors for the Madison, Wisconsin Quality Improvement Network and Goodwill Industries.

Pasch and his wife Everly are natives of Kendall, Wisconsin. They have two children.

GERALD C. POMRANING

GERALD C. POMRANING (Large image)

GERALD C. POMRANING

Gerald Pomraning is a prolific engineer and scientist. Through a series of more than 200 journal papers and two research monographs, he has made substantial contributions to nuclear reactor theory, radiative transfer, transport and kinetic theory and radiation hydrodynamics. His work has revolved around the Boltzmann transport equation and its various approximations and applications (nuclear reactor design, global climate change, medical beam therapy, inertially confined fusion, optical transmission and isotope separation).

Pomraning earned a BS in chemical engineering from UW-Madison in 1957. In 1958, he attended Technische Hogeschool te Delft in The Netherlands as a Fulbright Fellow. In 1962, he earned his PhD in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His work is known as being mathematically sound and thorough. It has led to several new calculational tools in reactor physics and radiative transfer and has provided the mathematical justification for tools developed by others.

Of special note is his work on variational methods in transport theory, application of asymptotic methods to kinetic equations, development of singular eigenfunction techniques in transport theory, and quantification of radiation transport in stochastic media. In addition, his work has seen application in widely varying fields, such as neutral atom transport in fusion plasmas, atmospheric radiative transfer, and photon transmission through hot electron environments.

Pomraning started his professional career in 1962 as a staff physicist and manager with the General Electric Company and later worked for Gulf General Atomic. In 1969, he and two colleagues founded Science Applications International Corporation which is now one of the nation's largest employee-owned companies with more than 16,000 employees. Pomraning has also served as consultant and advisor to several national laboratories in this country and as visiting professor and scientist at several European universities and national laboratories.

Pomraning is a professor of engineering and applied science in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles.

PETER P. TONG

PETER P. TONG (Large image)

PETER P. TONG

Peter Tong is an electrical engineer, entrepreneur and technical manager who, through innovative application of new technology, has created numerous business enterprises which have contributed significantly to serving the needs of society.

He is an advocate of the entrepreneurial spirit for the good of the country's economy and for the satisfaction of people who "have a better idea." Together with five other UW-Madison alumni, Tong helped establish the UW Technology Enterprise Cooperative (UW-TEC), an organization which fosters entrepreneurial relationships between faculty, students, and industry. He provided start-up funds and serves on an advisory panel to breathe life into the organization.

Tong was born and raised in Shanghai, China. After an injury ended his basketball career, he came to the U.S. and earned a BS in electrical engineering from Kansas State University in 1963. In 1965 Tong earned an MS in electrical engineering from UW-Madison. He has since been continuously immersed in entrepreneurial activity.

In 1966, Tong and fellow UW-Madison graduate student Richard Thomas, started T&T Technology in Tong's basement. The company offered digital electronic data acquisition systems to clinical laboratories. Tong purchased controlling interest in 1968 and eventually merged T&T into Technicon. Tong has repeated this pattern several times. He has also specialized in acquiring companies struggling from technological or management problems and nursing them back to health.

Tong moved to California in 1978 but commuted to Janesville, Wisconsin where he was president and CEO of Burdick Corporation until it was purchased by Siemens. He is currently CEO of E for M Corporation which is a comprehensive international cardiology company with manufacturing facilities in Freiburg, Germany, Torrance, California and Lenexa, Kansas.

Tong learned to sail as a member of the UW Hoofers club and is an avid racer. His yacht, Orient Express, a Santa Cruz 70, took second in the most recent TransPac race from Los Angeles to Honolulu.

Tong and his wife Janet (a UW-Madison alumna) live in Long Beach, California and have four children.

GARY C. VANIC

GARY C. VANIC (Large image)

GARY C. VANIC

Gary Vanic is a proven senior executive whose track record shows successful implementation of major organizational change with demonstrated results. As vice president of cheese operations for Land 0'Lakes, Inc., he is responsible for the manufacture of more than $750 million worth of cheese products for the consumer, food service and food ingredient markets. He oversees production in nine upper Midwest plants employing 1,400 people.

Vanic earned his BS and MS in industrial engineering at UW-Madison in 1974 and 1977. During the past 13 years he has held positions in operations, information systems and corporate planning. He previously worked for the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center and ALCOA, the Aluminum Corporation of America. In 1981, he joined Land O'Lakes.

Vanic's key accomplishments with Land O'Lakes include consolidating three cheese divisions into one, rationalizing the plants and product mix and generating multi-million dollar savings. In addition, Vanic reduced inventory by more than 25 percent, introduced total quality management resulting in significant process improvements, and led a company-wide effort to develop additional market growth which identified 160 million pounds of new business.

From 1986 to 1990, Vanic served Land O'Lakes as vice president of information systems. He was responsible for a large-scale information-systems organization which provides services to two, $2 billion corporations with business in multiple industries.

As vice president of information systems, Vanic merged two large systems organizations, consolidated data centers and telecommunications networks, and decreased manpower. He reduced the annual budget by 40 percent while significantly increasing the work processed, and merged the information systems of two large corporations in 12 weeks with no disruptions.

Vanic has made his extensive experience available to the College of Engineering by serving on the Industrial Engineering Advisory Committee.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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