1993 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

SANFORD A. KLEIN
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
The 1993 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

DAVID C. LARBALESTIER
Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
The 1993 Byron Bird Award

JOHN W. MITCHELL
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
The 1993 Ragnar E. Onstad Award

ROBERT F. PERRAS
Director, Engineering Audiovisual Services
1993 Bollinger Academic Staff Award

JES ASMUSSEN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CHARLES C. BAKER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

NED W. BECHTHOLD
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROBERT K. CATTERSON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GEORGE E. MILLER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES E. PATTON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DAVID W. PETERSON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RAFAEL RANGEL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

VINOD K. SAHNEY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN L. SELKY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

MICHAEL R. SFAT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROBERT J. SMITH
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

THOMAS R. VANDERPOOL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RICHARD N. WHITE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

SANFORD A. KLEIN

SANFORD A. KLEIN (Large image)

SANFORD A. KLEIN

Sanford "Sandy" Klein is this year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in teaching engineering students. He is committed to quality education for not only his mechanical engineering students, but also students in other College of Engineering departments and at other universities worldwide.

Klein is a leader in developing educational software for university-level thermodynamics and heat-transfer courses. His three programs provide sophisticated computer instruction that has won accolades from students and educators alike. His first, CP/Thermo, is distributed as part of a popular thermodynamics textbook package by HarperCollins. The software features context-sensitive help on request, providing first a hint, then a suggestion, then the answer.

He also wrote FEHT (finite element heat transfer) software, which won a Distinguished Software Award in the 1990 EDUCOM competition. It can solve problems in heat transfer, steady electric currents, electrostatics and scalar magnetostatics and provides a drawing environment, a finite element calculation procedure and graphical output.

Klein's third program, Engineering Equation Solver (EES), has had a major impact on student learning in thermodynamics and many other engineering courses. EES reduces the burden of solving complicated systems of nonlinear algebraic equations that commonly appear in the design of thermal systems. The program is particularly useful for upper-level mechanical engineering research.

In addition to software, Klein has developed graduate courses in intermediate and advanced thermodynamics. He also co-authored Solar Heating Design,, which was translated into German and Russian.

KIein's teaching excellence has been recognized numerous times. He won his department's Pi Tau Sigma Outstanding Teacher Award in 1979, '91 and '92, and the college's Polygon Engineering Council Outstanding Instructor Award in 1991 and '92. He also received a university-wide Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1990.

After earning a BS from the University of Illinois-Chicago in 1972, Klein pursued his MS ('73) and PhD ('76) in chemical engineering from UW-Madison. He joined the mechanical engineering faculty in 1977.

DAVID C. LARBALESTIER

DAVID C. LARBALESTIER (Large image)

DAVID C. LARBALESTIER

David C. Larbalestier is this year's recipient of the Byron Bird Award for excellence in a research publication. His award-winning work, however, involves not one, but six publications leading to the most advanced composite superconductors yet.

The series, co-authored with various colleagues, provided the scientific basis for and guided the development of the fabrication methods currently used to manufacture virtually all niobium-titanium alloy superconducting wires and cables. The publications cover the processing, microstructural and electromagnetic characterization and the industrial realization aspects of this work.

Published between 1984 and 1987, the papers impacted the field of practical low-temperature superconductors. Almost immediately, the current density one could reliably expect from practical conductors increased by 50 percent from the 1983 values. Today, that value has almost doubled.

The groundwork laid in these papers made possible such advanced applications as the superconducting super collider (SSC). They also led to large cost savings for all magnetic field applications of superconductivity, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instrumentation. Collectively, the insights in these papers have saved tens of millions of dollars off the cost of MRI instruments, and it is estimated that the cost of the superconductor for the SSC now under construction will be at least $300 million less than it would have been without the developments of these papers.

The advances made by Larbalestier and his research group also stimulated industry to improve its processing and quality control in the manufacture of high-performance niobium-titanium superconductors.

A prolific writer and lecturer, Larbalestier received his BS ('65) and PhD ('70) in physical metallurgy from Imperial College at the University of London. In 1976, he joined the College of Engineering's Department of Materials Science and Engineering, where today he is the L.V. Shubnikov Professor of Superconducting Materials and director of the Applied Superconductivity Center. He holds a joint appointment in the Department of Physics.

JOHN W. MITCHELL

JOHN W. MITCHELL (Large image)

JOHN W. MITCHELL

The Ragnar E. Onstad Service to Society Award is presented to John W. Mitchell for his efforts to educate the public about the potential of global nuclear war.

A member of the Madison steering committee of Beyond War, a national nonprofit organization, Mitchell was a tireless speaker against the arms race and a proponent of building a world where nations no longer use war to resolve conflicts. By conducting workshops, giving public speeches and training volunteers, Mitchell has helped the Madison chapter succeed and grow. In the capacity of educational committee chairman, he developed training and resource materials and conducted regional training sessions. Mitchell also helped organize the College of Engineering's 1986 Strategic Defense Initiative Forum, for which he was the keynote speaker.

Historically, national strategic policy was based on deterrence, but Mitchell believed that policy was obsolete and suicidal because of the number of nuclear weapons available throughout the world. An active member of the First Unitarian Society of Madison, he advocates a national strategic policy based on respect for all individuals that addresses the root causes of war by alleviating injustice and deprivation. His commitment to these principles evolved from engineering training in problem solving and his background as a Unitarian.

Mitchell's community service activities also include preparing and serving meals for Madison's homeless, and helping build houses for Habitat for Humanity.

Professionally, Mitchell has won international recognition for his research on energy systems modeling. He is the author of Energy Engineering and numerous publications dealing with various aspects of energy, particularly solar. As an educator, Mitchell developed undergraduate and graduate mechanical engineering courses and received seven teaching awards, including several from Pi Tau Sigma and Polygon Engineering Council.

Mitchell earned a BS ('56), MS ('57) and PhD ('63) in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. He joined the UW-Madison faculty in 1962 and served as chairman of the mechanical engineering department from 1983 to 1987. He is a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin.

ROBERT F PERRAS

ROBERT F PERRAS (Large image)

ROBERT F. PERRAS

Robert F. Perras is the winner of the 1993 Bollinger Academic Staff Achievement Award. Director of Engineering Audiovisual Services since 1985, he has provided leadership to achieve quality services and facilities for multi-media education.

In addition to videotaping more than 75 courses for the college's outreach program and the Department of Engineering Professional Development, Perras is often asked to produce other educational tools. He assists in nearly every aspect, from scriptwriting and graphics to location scouting and editing.

To add to his knowledge of video production equipment, Perras learned about microcomputers as a way to increase the flexibility and sophistication of videos. He also enthusiastically supported the introduction of computer-based, audiographic teleconferencing into the college's learning technology mix, and he provided the hardware and staff support for the audiographics classroom in Wendt Library.

When the Engineering Hall addition was under construction, Perras advised in choice of equipment and design for the new multimedia auditoria. He learned about architectural design and equipment used in similar auditoria before incorporating the best features into the college's facility. The larger auditorium, when complete, will include a state-of-the-art interactive response system.

Perras also helped develop an interactive computer laboratory, which has become a model for similar labs in the college and throughout the university, and has co-authored an engineering graphics textbook (Descriptive Geometry).

Outside of UW-Madison, Perras was called on to help design facilities and equipment specifications for a media production and instructional resources center at the Institute Pertanian Bogor in Bogor, Indonesia. In 1986, he flew there to install the equipment and help train the staff.

Perras, who holds a 1974 BA in the radio/television sequence of communication arts from UW-Madison, has worked for the college since 1977. Two years later, he won an award for best presentation of new technology in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' film festival with a video titled "Cryogenic Tire Recycling."

JES ASMUSSEN

JES ASMUSSEN (Large image)

JES ASMUSSEN

Jes Asmussen is an internationally renowned innovator in developing new techniques for plasma materials processing, microwave discharges for chemical synthesis and spacecraft propulsion.

His distinguished career began with three electrical engineering degrees from UW-Madison: a BS in 1960, an MS in 1964 and a PhD in 1967. That same year, he joined Michigan State University as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He became an associate professor in 1971, and a full professor in 1975. He served as his department's associate chair from 1973-75, and as its chair since 1990.

Technology developed by Asmussen and his students has been applied in research and industrial laboratories throughout the world. More than 20 years ago, he developed microwave plasma and free-radical applicators and applied them to chemical synthesis. Since then, he has developed a series of plasma cavity applicators which are compact, efficient and capable of creating microwave discharges from very low pressures to several atmospheres. This technology has been applied to many areas, including as microwave plasma free-radical sources and plasma thin-film deposition (including diamond thin films). He also helped conceptualize and demonstrate experimentally a microwave plasma space engine concept. Now known as the microwave electrothermal thruster, this engine is undergoing further development by NASA.

Asmussen's inventions have been patented by Michigan State and licensed to industry. Examples include microwave plasma diamond thin-film deposition machines licensed to Norton Company, and MSU-designed electron cyclotron plasma sources used in molecular beam epitaxy processing, etching and deposition of thin films in more than 60 industrial and university laboratories in the U.S. and Europe.

His honors include Michigan State's Distinguished Faculty Award in 1988, and election as fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in 1992. The author of more than 190 journal and conference papers, he holds 11 U.S. patents and has served as a consultant to more than 20 private industrial and university labs.

Asmussen and his wife, Colleen Cooper, have three children and two stepchildren.

CHARLES C. BAKER

CHARLES C. BAKER (Large image)

CHARLES C. BAKER

Charles Baker has provided technical leadership to the nuclear fusion community for more than 20 years. Currently a research program director at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Fusion Energy Division, Baker received his BS, MS and PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the last in 1972.

His doctorate in hand, Baker joined the General Atomic Company as a senior physicist the same year. He moved up in the ranks of General Atomic, eventually earning the post of project manager in 1976. In 1977, he moved to the Argonne National Laboratory as director of the Fusion Power Program, where he remained until 1989. He was responsible for all fusion activity, including fusion reactor system and design studies, materials research, fusion blanket technology and plasma engineering.

During his tenure at Argonne, Baker received the Outstanding Achievement Award from the American Nuclear Society's Fusion Energy Division. In 1988, the U.S. Department of Energy gave him a Distinguished Associate Award for leadership of its Technical Program Analysis Activity. The same year, he became a fellow of the American Nuclear Society.

In 1989, Baker left Argonne to join the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he has been responsible for plasma technology, advanced system design, magnetics, and materials research and development activities.

Baker has led teams of engineers and scientists from national laboratories, companies and universities in fusion system and design studies. These studies focus on the practical realization of fusion power, and include the current International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in which UW-Madison scientists are participating. He is currently leader of the U.S. Home Team for ITER.

Baker has published more than 40 papers in refereed engineering journals and conference proceedings. He is the editor of Fusion Engineering and Design and an editorial board member for Fusion Technology.

NED W. BECHTHOLD

NED W. BECHTHOLD (Large image)

NED W. BECHTHOLD

Ned Bechthold's return to Wisconsin paved the way to numerous awards. As president and chief executive officer of Payne & Dolan Inc., an asphalt producer and contractor based in Waukesha, Bechthold has won recognition for special guidance and assistance he provided to minority business enterprises in the state.

Among his citations is the Wisconsin Department of Transportation Secretary's Award for the Development of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises. He also received the 1992 Frank Kirkpatrick Award from the Milwaukee Foundation for his work in recruiting and hiring more than 100 minorities from Milwaukee's central city.

A native of Milwaukee, he graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1959 with a BS in civil engineering. He received a commission as an officer in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before returning to Wisconsin to work in the transportation industry. In 1980 he became the top officer of Payne & Dolan.

His service to the community has taken many forms. He is chairman of the board of St. Luke's Hospital-Milwaukee, a trustee of the Siebert Foundation of Wisconsin, and a director of the Bradley Sports Center, the Boys and Girls Club of Milwaukee and the Next Door Foundation. He also is a director of Firstar Bank of Milwaukee.

A registered professional engineer, Bechthold plays a role in numerous professional organizations. His activities include service as chairman of the National Research Center for Asphalt Technology at Auburn University, and past president of the Wisconsin Road Builders Association and the Wisconsin Asphalt Pavement Association.

Bechthold and his wife, Helen, have four children. Every family member is a graduate of UW-Madison; two are civil engineers.

ROBERT K. CATTERSON

ROBERT K. CATTERSON (Large image)

ROBERT K. CATTERSON

For more than 30 years, Robert Catterson has been a leader in the research and development of a wide variety of engines, including spark ignition piston, diesel, Stirling and Wankel engines.

After receiving his BS in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University in 1953, he joined the Navy for three years before becoming a project engineer at Sunstrand Aviation. In 1958, he began his long association with engine research and development when he joined Briggs and Stratton. Catterson received an MS in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in 1964 and then joined the Battelle Memorial Institute, where he became chief of the mechanical energy systems division.

He rejoined Briggs and Stratton in 1973 and rose through various positions to become vice president of research and development. During his career there, he was responsible for the development of more than a dozen new production engine models. A registered professional engineer, he holds 11 patents. He retired in 1992 but remains an active consultant to the company.

Catterson has been a leader in many technical societies and industrial associations. He is a past president and member of the board of directors of the Engine Manufacturers Association. He has served the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) as a member of its board of directors, chair of the 1983 Off-Highway Meeting, and a member of its Sections and Engineering Education Boards. In 1991, he was co-chair of the International Small Engine Technology Conference in Yokohama, Japan.

He also has a deep interest in college engineering education. He organized the first SAE Mini-Baja student design competition in 1978 and was a longtime member of the SAE Student Activities Committee. He also served on advisory boards at UW-Madison and the Milwaukee School of Engineering. Recently he helped initiate a joint industry-state-university consortium on small-engine emission research, in conjunction with the college's Engine Research Center.

Catterson, a native of Lincoln, Nebraska, currently resides in Tucson, Arizona, and Brookfield, Wisconsin. He and his wife, Patricia, have two children.

GEORGE E. MILLER

GEORGE E. MILLER (Large image)

GEORGE E. MILLER

George Miller has been a leader in the design and manufacture of two-stroke engines for more than 25 years. After receiving his BS in mechanical engineering from Illinois in 1960, he joined Outboard Marine Corporation (OMC) in Waukesha, Wisconsin, as a development engineer.

He has stayed with OMC throughout much of his professional life. From 1966-70, he served as manager of OMC's technology department. From 1970-75, he managed OMC's Wankel Engine Program.

In 1975, he left OMC to become director of engineering at Western Forge/Emerson Electric Engineering. In 1982, he returned to OMC, where today he holds the position of chief engineer-research.

Along the way, Miller continued his education in both engineering and business. He received a master's degree in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in 1967, and an MBA from Loyola University in 1975.

Miller's seminal work on exhaust tuning was the first to address the problem as a nonresonant system and led the way to a number of important patents. He was an early proponent of technology transfer to product groups and helped to develop such a functional organization at OMC. Among his many technical achievements was leading the team that designed and manufactured the Wankel snowmobile engine.

Today, Miller is helping lead the way to new low-emission marine engines. He also has been a leader in forming a new state-university-industrial consortium for low-emission engine research, in conjunction with the college's Engine Research Center.

His distinguished professional career includes 10 patents and 33 years of membership in the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). He chaired SAE's Rotary Engine Committee from 1970-75.

A native of Elgin, Illinois, Miller has been active in community service organizations including Goodwill Industries and the YMCA. He and his wife, Connie, have three children.

JAMES E. PATTON

JAMES E. PATTON (Large image)

JAMES E. PATTON

James Patton joined Eastman Kodak Company to combine his chemical engineering background with his interest in photography. Twenty-three years later, he is vice president of Professional Imaging for the United States and Canada region and still loves photography (he owns six cameras).

Patton, a native of Detroit, earned a BS in chemistry and chemical engineering at the University of Michigan. Opting to pursue the chemical engineering path, he earned a PhD with his research on gas chromatographic chemical reactors under Stanley Langer at UW-Madison in 1970. He joined Kodak the same year.

Patton started in the research laboratories, specializing in silver halide emulsion development kinetics and in emulsion optics. His work became more applied as he moved to emulsion design and then to product development of new color films, including the first 400-speed color negative film. In 1979, he became head of the Color Systems Engineering Lab, which designed novel photographic systems and evaluated customer-preferred attributes of new photographic products. In that capacity, he served as liaison to many marketing teams on new products.

When the professional imaging business was defined at Kodak in 1984, Patton was named to lead product development. In 1986, he also became responsible for the manufacture of all professional films and papers. During this period, he completed the Advanced Development Program at the Kellogg School.

In 1991, Patton moved to head the Professional Imaging Division in the United States and Canada with responsibility for marketing and sales, continuing his career's movement from basic research to final customer interface.

Patton is a member of the Photo Marketing Association, the Association of Professional Color Laboratories, the Professional Photographers of America and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. His research interests included film building, color physics, photographic systems, image structure evaluation and chromatography. He recently was the Hugh Hulburt Memorial Lecturer at Northwestern's chemical engineering department.

Patton and his wife, Elizabeth (who holds a PhD in chemistry from UW-Madison and also works at Kodak), have two children.

DAVID

DAVID W. PETERSON (Large image)

DAVID W. PETERSON

Education, innovation and entrepreneurship are the cornerstones of David Peterson's career, in which mathematical modeling has been the central theme.

After completing his BS in electrical engineering at UW-Madison in 1962, he earned an MS (1963) and PhD (1965) in electrical engineering from Stanford University. His work there focused on computer-based pattern recognition. He then served in the U.S. Army as a mathematician and hybrid simulation project officer at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, working on problems in low-frequency electromagnetic propagation and helicopter fire control systems.

In 1967, he joined the Northwestern University Graduate School of Management faculty, teaching statistics, computing and mathematical programming. He was promoted to associate professor in 1970, and for the academic year 1971-72, he was a research fellow at the International Institute of Management in West Berlin, studying theories of information and optimal control.

In 1973, he moved to Duke University as a professor of business administration, and soon began consulting with attorneys on the use of statistics in litigation. In 1979, he founded and became president of the consulting firm PRI Associates, whose activities now include the development of software to assist managers with various kinds of repetitive tasks. He also has worked with legal teams to help determine the origins of computer code of disputed parentage.

At Duke, Peterson has also taught in the Departments of Health Administration and Mathematics, the School of Law, and the Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences. An adjunct professor since 1984, he most recently has been teaching statistical theory and applications to graduate students in the School of the Environment, and this fall he is back teaching in the MBA program.

A member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the American Statistical Association, Peterson has also been active in local organizations promoting student interest in mathematics and science in public schools. In 1985, he established UW-Madison's Harold A. and Marion F. Peterson Undergraduate Award in Electrical and Computer Engineering, in honor of his parents.

Peterson and his wife, Judith, live in Durham, North Carolina.

RAFAEL RANGEL

RAFAEL RANGEL (Large image)

RAFAEL RANGEL

UW-Madison is playing a bit part in the education of more than 57,000 students in Mexico. That's because the director of their university system, Rafael Rangel, earned two advanced degrees from UW-Madison.

Rangel earned a BS in engineering at Mexico's Monterrey Institute of Technology (Institute Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey) in 1965 with a concentration in mechanical and electrical engineering. He then came to UW-Madison, completing an MS in mechanical engineering in one year.

After two years as a development engineer for Honeywell in Minneapolis, he returned to the Monterrey Institute of Technology in 1968 as an assistant professor. There, he taught courses in automatic controls and instrumentation, and oversaw construction of new laboratories. He also worked with local industry, instructing their staffs in machine automation.

Rangel returned to UW-Madison to pursue a PhD, which he was awarded in 1973. The Monterrey Institute of Technology — with 26 campuses throughout Mexico—called him again and he returned, this time to stay. Working with the new Queretaro campus, he first was associate director in 1973, and then director from 1975 to 1979.

Rangel then became vice president in charge of the institute's central zone of seven campuses. Since 1985, he has been president of the Monterrey Institute of Technology, the largest multi-campus private university system in Latin America. During his administration, the institute has assumed a greater role in supporting Mexico's effort to become more globally competitive.

Among his other activities, Rangel is a member of several advisory organizations: the Mexican Presidential Advisory Committee on the North American Free Trade Agreement, IBM'S Latin America Board, and the Advisory Council of the Carnegie Bosch Institute (Carnegie Mellon University) for Applied Studies in International Management.

Rangel lives in Garza Garcia, Mexico, with his wife and two children.

VINOD K. SAHNEY

VINOD K. SAHNEY (Large image)

VINOD K. SAHNEY

Vinod Sahney has been a leader in improving quality and productivity in health care in this country. He currently is senior vice president of planning and strategic development and a member of the office of the president at one of this country's largest health care systems—Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. During his 12 years at Henry Ford, the health system has grown more than 500 percent and maintains an annual operating revenue of $1.5 billion.

Sahney received his PhD in industrial engineering in 1970 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he served as president of the International Club and as a board member for the Wisconsin Union. For 25 years he has focused on productivity and quality improvement in the health care delivery system. He has served on the faculty of Harvard University and Wayne State University, and for 15 years he has been a key faculty member of the Harvard University Executive Programs in Health Policy and Management.

A widely published author, Sahney is the recipient of numerous awards: the 1992 Dean Conley Award from the American College of Health Care Executives; the 1985 Fellow Award and the 1990 Distinguished Service Award from the Institute of Industrial Engineers; and the 1984 and 1992 Best Paper Award, the 1991 Quality Award and the Fellow Award from the Health Care Information and Management Systems Society of the American Hospital Association.

Currently a member of the board for the Institute for Health Care Improvement, he has served in other leadership positions as well: president of the Society of Health Systems; national chairman of the Health Applications Section Operations Research Society of America; chairman of the Health Services Division of the Institute of Industrial Engineers; conference chairman for the National Forum on Quality; and a member of the publications policy board and the research advisory board of the Institute of Industrial Engineers.

Sahney also saves time for community service. He is a member of the board of directors of the Cranbrook Horizons-Upward Bound program, which helps inner-city youths to prepare for college. For the past five years, he has been chairman of the scholarship committee of the University of Wisconsin Alumni Club of Detroit.

Sahney and his wife, Gail, also a UW-Madison alum, have two children.

JOHN L. SELKY

JOHN L. SELKY (Large image)

JOHN L. SELKY

John Selky joined Inland Steel as a quality control trainee in 1959, after receiving a BS in metallurgical engineering from UW-Madison. After advancing to supervising metallurgist, he became assistant superintendent and superintendent of several of the company's rolling mills.

He earned an MS in industrial management at Purdue University-Calumet campus in 1976. He served as assistant general manager at Flat Products Mills from 1979 until 1984, when he became project manager and eventually general manager of the cold mill project which utilized Japanese technology from Nippon Steel Corporation.

In 1987, Selky was elected president of I/N Tek, and became president of I/N Kote in 1989. I/N Tek and I/N Kote are joint ventures of Inland Steel and Nippon Steel. The companies were built in New Carlisle, Indiana, and Selky was responsible for design, construction and start-up of the two facilities. Representing a combined investment of $1.1 billion, they are the largest American-Japanese joint venture investment in the steel industry.

I/N Tek converts hot rolled coils, produced at Inland's East Chicago plant, into high-quality cold-reduced finished sheet products for the automotive, appliance, office furniture and service center markets. This plant produces one million tons of highest quality cold rolled product annually. I/N Kote converts cold-rolled sheet products from I/N Tek and Inland Steel into zinc-coated corrosion-resistant products for the automotive industry. Electroplating and hot-dip continuous lines are utilized to produce a total of 900,000 tons of high-quality sheet products per year.

Selky's professional memberships include the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers and the American Iron and Steel Institute. He has also continued his contacts with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at UW-Madison, hiring a number of graduates and helping obtain scholarship money for the department from Inland.

A native of Milwaukee, Selky's civic activities include membership on the board of the South Bend Chamber of Commerce, and service as a trustee of Project Future in St. Joseph County, Indiana. He and his wife, Marjorie, have four children and live in Granger, Indiana.

MICHAEL R. SFAT

MICHAEL R. SFAT (Large image)

MICHAEL R. SFAT

The fermentation processes for both beer and penicillin may not have been the same without the efforts of Michael Sfat—one of the few scientists responsible for the birth and development of biochemical engineering.

Born in Romania in 1921, Sfat and his family emigrated to the United States when he was two. Sfat attended Cornell University, earning a BS and MS in chemical engineering in 1943 and 1947, respectively. He then began work for Merck & Company of Rahway, New Jersey, as an assistant microbiologist and member of a task force studying how to translate improved antibiotic yields from bench scale to large production vessels. The project required then-unique attributes of training in both traditional chemical engineering and industrial microbiology. The success of this and similar projects helped improve profits, thereby stimulating academic and industrial activity that led to widespread use of biotechnology in the process industries.

Sfat came to Wisconsin in 1952, when he was appointed director of development for Pabst Brewing Company's pilot plant. In 1954, he moved to Rahr Malting Company in Manitowoc, where he held the posts of research director, coordinator of research and development, and vice president of research and development. Bio-Technical Resources — the world's first contract biotechnology research and development firm—was begun in 1962 as a Rahr subsidiary, but Sfat later became sole proprietor.

In 1989, he sold the assets of his company to a DuPont/ConAgra partnership, and today he is president emeritus.

Sfat holds five patents, all relating to the brewing industry. Other professional activities have included lectures, participation in technical societies, publications, government consultation and service as university liaison. He has served as president of the American Society of Brewing Chemists and was a member of the Wisconsin Governor's Council on Biotechnology.

He and his wife, Jane, live in Manitowoc and spend time at their Door County home. They have two daughters.

ROBERT J. SMITH

ROBERT J. SMITH (Large image)

ROBERT J. SMITH

The career of Robert Smith represents a rare combination of expertise in practical construction field experience and the legal implications of this work.

After receiving a BS in civil engineering from UW-Madison in 1967, Smith served in the U.S. Navy as a civil engineer corps officer in venues from Florida to the Antarctic. He received his JD with honors from UW-Madison in 1974. He then received a joint appointment as an assistant professor in the college's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and UW Extension.

While at the university, he was appointed by Governor Lee Dreyfus to be chairman of the Wisconsin Transportation Commission, where he initiated a program of deregulation.

In 1983, he became an attorney with the Wisconsin office of Wickwire Gavin, P.C., devoting his practice to construction matters including dispute resolution, advising owners, engineers, architects and contractors, and contract drafting and review. In 1992, he became executive vice president of Construction Strategies, Inc., a subsidiary of Wickwire Gavin, which provides dispute avoidance, dispute resolution and contract review services. Current assignments include the $202 million Boston Harbor Outfall Tunnel and the $600 million Federal Triangle Project in Washington, D.C.

An expert in alternative dispute resolution techniques, he serves on panels of neutrals including California's Public Works Arbitration Panel, the American Arbitration Association's National Construction Industry Panel, and the Center for Public Resources' National Construction Panel. He has also been on the board of Warzyn Engineering and served on a National Academy of Sciences study committee recommending construction contracting practices for the superconducting super collider. A fellow in both the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American College of Construction Lawyers, he is an internationally recognized authority on construction contract risk allocation.

A registered professional engineer, Smith has developed many continuing education courses for the college's Department of Engineering Professional Development, and has lectured in more than 100 courses. Currently, he teaches "Legal Aspects of Engineering" (CEE 491) each fall.

He and his wife, Marjorie, have five children and have lived in the Madison area for 22 years.

THOMAS R. VANDERPOOL

THOMAS R. VANDERPOOL (Large image)

THOMAS R. VANDERPOOL

Thomas Vanderpool's career has been spent on the leading edge of applying new electronics and software technology. His degrees in electrical and computer engineering from UW-Madison (BS in 1972; MS in 1974) were the springboard for his success.

After completing his master's degree, Vanderpool joined 3M Company, where he has advanced rapidly to positions of increasing technical and managerial responsibility. His areas of expertise include digital electronics, real-time process control, systems architecture, database design, expert systems and statistical process control. His work has touched on many of the company's key laboratories and projects, including computer control technology, Information Systems Laboratory, Memory Media Process Technologies Laboratory, and Health Information Systems.

Recently, as a technical manager, he oversaw an engineering group performing research and delivery of artificial intelligence programs for new products and processes. He also defined and introduced a complex networked computer system serving the Computer Integrated Manufacturing Program in optical disk technologies at several locations. He will soon complete a two-year assignment for Health Information Systems at 3M Laboratories in Neuss, Germany. This includes participating on a Technical Committee for European Normalization of Medical Informatics.

Vanderpool's continued contact with the college's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has been a high priority. He has served as a guest lecturer, student recruiter and advisor on thesis topics. He has been instrumental in strengthening the 3M Foundation's involvement with the department and university.

A native of Wisconsin and a registered professional engineer, Vanderpool is also a veteran of the U.S. Army Reserve and the Wisconsin National Guard. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery and the university's Bascom Hill Society.

Vanderpool and his wife, Carol, have three children and live in White Bear Lake, Minnesota. His father is a 1950 mechanical engineering graduate of UW-Madison, and his son and nephew are freshmen on campus this fall.

RICHARD N. WHITE

RICHARD N. WHITE (Large image)

RICHARD N. WHITE

The professional experiences of Richard White include engineering practice, consulting and teaching at the university level. After earning bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering at UW-Madison, he became a structural engineer for John A. Strand in Madison in 1958. Interested in furthering his engineering research knowledge, he returned to the university in pursuit of a PhD, which he received in 1961.

White joined the faculty of Cornell University's Department of Structural Engineering, where he is today the James A. Friend Family Distinguished Professor of Engineering. His research interests span many areas of structural engineering, with a primary concentration in the response of concrete structures subjected to severe loadings. He directed Cornell's School of Civil and Environmental Engineering from 1978 to 1984, and served as associate dean for undergraduate programs in its College of Engineering for two and a half years beginning in 1987.

During his academic career climb, White has taken time for industry work, including experience with Bell Telephone Laboratories and Gulf General Atomic, Inc. During visiting professorship appointments, he has traveled to the University of California-Berkeley, the University of Puerto Rico, Southwestern Jiaotong University in the People's Republic of China, and Durham University in England.

He also does extensive consulting in his field and has been extremely successful in attracting grant money for his research. His publications include more than 120 technical papers and six books, which he has co-authored or edited.

In 1992, White was elected to the National Academy of Engineering "for advancing understanding of the behavior of structures, for innovations in engineering education and for leadership in concrete technology." He was the first recipient of the Cornell Society of Engineers-Tau Beta Pi Excellence in Teaching Award and has twice been named Cornell Chi Epsilon teacher of the year. He is a fellow of the American Concrete Institute and an appointee to numerous national and international committees on structural engineering.

White and his wife, Margaret Howell White (who also holds a UW-Madison degree), have two children.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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