1992 Award Recipients

RALPH W. KIEFER
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
The 1992 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

DAVID S. MALKUS
Professor of Engineering Mechanics and Astronautics
The 1992 Byron Bird Award

ROBERT J. SANDBERG
Manager, Mechanical Engineering Service Facilities
1992 Bollinger Academic Staff Award

MICHAEL A. AIMONE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

MARY BAKER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GORDON F. BRUNNER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

KEITH J. GARNETT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN J. HREN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN T. HUSTON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ALLEN A. KOZINSKI
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

KARL E. LONNGREN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROBERT C. MIERENDORF
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

PETER R. SCHNEIDER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

PETER E. STARKWEATHER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DAVID J. STORM
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RUDY J. TEKIPPE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RALPH W. KIEFER

RALPH W. KIEFER (Large image)

RALPH W. KIEFER

Ralph W. Kiefer, professor of civil and environmental engineering, is this year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in the teaching of engineering students. An instructor who places a high degree of importance on organization and quality of presentation materials, Kiefer says he teaches purely out of selfish reasons. "Teaching students is the most enjoyable part of my job."

Having taught and advised thousands of students for more than 30 years, Kiefer's enthusiasm and appreciation for knowledge are evident to his pupils. Former students use the following words to describe him: interesting, informative, enthusiastic, well organized, always in a good mood, and available to students.

One student credits Kiefer with giving her the support and confidence she needed to finish her studies. "The fact that he believed in me, steadfastly, from beginning to end, even when things got really difficult and my morale was at rock bottom is what allowed me to succeed. I left the program a fully confident, innovative, and competent professional with excellent prospects. What more could be asked of an educator than to make possible this kind of transformation in the lives of his students?"

For his outstanding teaching efforts, the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping awarded Kiefer the prestigious Earle J. Fennell Award in 1990, the highest educational award one can receive nationally in all fields of mapping science. In addition, Kiefer has written more than 60 publications including the highly acclaimed and widely adopted textbook Remote Sensing and Image Interpretations, co-authored by UW-Madison Professor Thomas M. Lillesand.

Kiefer received his BS in 1956, his MS in 1960, and PhD in 1964, all from Cornell University. He is a member of several organizations including the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. His talents have not gone unnoticed by colleagues, one of whom comments, "Somehow, he is able to balance all his professional endeavors and not lose sight of the importance of his family." In his free time, Kiefer enjoys camping in the northwest U.S. and Canada with his wife, Lois, a fourth grade teacher.

DAVID S. MALKUS

DAVID S. MALKUS (Large image)

DAVID S. MALKUS

David S. Malkus, professor of engineering mechanics and astronautics, is the recipient of the 1992 Byron Bird Award for Excellence in a Research Publication. He receives this award for his work on finite element methods of computer analysis and the publication, "Mixed Finite Element Methods—Reduced and Selective Integration Techniques: A Unification of Concepts." Co-authored by Thomas J.R. Hughes, the publication was honored as one of the five most referenced articles appearing in Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering.

Malkus' research has contributed to the understanding, development, and applications of finite element methods to problems in science and engineering. Finite element analysis, Malkus explains, is a way to model the physical world, making it amenable to high-speed computations. The research cited by the Byron Bird Award helped to clarify and solve the problem of imposing the constraint of incompressibility in the finite element modeling of fluids and solids.

He has authored more than 30 publications and contributed to Hughes' text, The Finite Element Method. With R.D. Cook and M.E. Plesha of the Department of Engineering Mechanics and Astronautics, he is a co-author of Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis, which has become a standard in engineering finite element education. Malkus recently became chair of the Rheology Research Center, an interdisciplinary research center at UW-Madison. He is affiliated with the Center for the Mathematical Sciences, and is a member of the Society of Rheology.

Malkus describes his career as a historical accident. He graduated from Yale University with an A.B. in music history in 1968, followed by a two-year tour of duty in the U .S. Army, including service as a scout dog handler in the Republic of Vietnam, for which he received the Combat Infantry Badge. He received his MS in mathematics in 1975 and his PhD in 1976, both from Boston University. He completed a postdoctoral research associateship at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards in 1977. He then worked at the mathematics department at the Illinois Institute of Technology, starting as an assistant professor and then as an associate professor. Malkus joined the UW-Madison faculty in 1984 as an associate professor and was made a professor in 1986.

ROBERT J. SANDBERG

ROBERT J. SANDBERG (Large image)

ROBERT J. SANDBERG

Robert J. Sandberg is the winner of the 1992 Bollinger Academic Staff Distinguished Achievement Award. Sandberg, an instrumentation specialist in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is cited for his years of dedicated teaching, and for his leadership in developing and managing the Mechanical Engineering Central Service Shops.

In his position, Sandberg advises students, faculty, and commercial companies on the design, evaluation, and construction of research and educational equipment, including projects for the annual Engineering Exposition. A major achievement is his success in teaching students how to integrate the theory of the classroom with the practical aspects of design and manufacturing. He also supervises all service facilities and employees in five shop rooms; assigns work; interprets drawings and specifications; advises or approves materials of fabrication; acts as engineering consultant to all customers; and controls expenditures, budgets, and accounting. In 1991, his staff of 12 civil service technicians and six students completed 1,250 projects, of which approximately 900 were research-funded and the remainder were for various departments and companies.

Sandberg is greatly admired by college and university faculty. One faculty member writes, "Bob has an unusual combination of both technical and people skills that he uses to educate engineers in Wisconsin and overseas." Another writes, "He's a mechanical genius—he grasps mechanical/electrical concepts like no other person I know."

In addition to his achievements on campus, Sandberg spent several months in 1982-83 at the Institute of Technology in Surabaya, Indonesia. There, he supervised the installation of hundreds of diverse laboratory devices, and instructed the Indonesian faculty on operation and teaching functions. A Michigan State professor who also worked in Surabaya wrote, "Much of the equipment had to be set up and installed, calibrated, and tested. Bob was literally priceless; he was the only one who could do this for the variety of laboratories—surveying, thermodynamics, engine lab, etc. He was level-headed, cool, cooperative, and effective."

Sandberg graduated from UW-Madison in 1964 with a BS in mechanical engineering and received his MS here in 1967.

MICHAEL A. AIMONE

MICHAEL A. AIMONE (Large image)

MICHAEL A. AIMONE

The career of Michael A. Aimone began in 1970 when he earned a BS in electrical engineering from Michigan Technological University. The same year, he joined the U.S. Air Force as a military officer. Now, he is the assistant director of civil engineering for the Department of Defense Strategic Defense Initiative Organization in Washington, D.C.

In the 1970s, Aimone was assigned to various Air Force organizations where he worked in energy conservation and taught engineering and environmental sciences. While stationed in Florida, he completed an MS in electrical engineering at the University of Florida.

In 1979, Aimone used his teaching expertise gained in the Air Force to become a program coordinator for the UW-Madison Extension Department of Engineering. In this position, he planned and lectured in a series of professional-level continuing education courses in engineering, architecture, and the social sciences. His courses were always well attended and achieved superior ratings.

Aimone returned to military life in 1980, becoming a civilian electrical engineer for the Air Force Headquarters. In 1983, he was selected for the Industrial College of the Armed Forces run by the Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He then was promoted to chief of the Strategic Planning Branch and acting chief of the Plans Division for U.S. Air Force Headquarters. He held those posts until 1987 when he became the Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Air Force Communications Command.

He was selected in 1989 as assistant to the Director for Emergency Planning in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Security Policy. In this position, he became an important member of the Secretary of Defense Crisis Management staff, directing response measures during Hurricane Hugo, the Loma Prieta earthquake, and Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. In his current position, Aimone directs, controls, and executes the SDI Organization's $100 million facilities engineering and environmental protection activities. Aimone has remained active in the U.S. Air Force Reserves, has been promoted to the rank of colonel, and leads a 550-person civil engineering organization.

MARY BAKER

MARY BAKER (Large image)

MARY BAKER

Mary Baker graduated from UW-Madison in 1966 with a BS in engineering mechanics. She went on to earn MS and PhD degrees in applied mechanics from CalTech where her thesis work included the development of a method for measuring volume flow rates in microcirculation.

Before moving in 1977 to Structural Dynamics Research Corporation, Inc. (SDRC) in San Diego, she worked for Rohr Industries on dynamic analysis of magnetically levitated trains, and for Systems, Science, and Software on explosive source function modeling. Baker is now vice president of Engineering Services for SDRC's Western Regional Operations (WRO).

At SDRC, which develops and devises applications for mechanical computer-aided engineering (CAE) software, Baker has made significant technical contributions. She directed a combined experimental and analytical effort to qualify communications shelters for nuclear overpressure. She was program manager of a joint effort with NASA Langley Research Center to develop a comprehensive software tool for systems engineering analysis of Space Station Freedom, a program now widely used by NASA centers. She and her staff have worked with nearly every major aerospace company to help improve their engineering design processes. Following the loss of Space Shuttle Challenger, her staff contributed to the solid rocket motor recovery program by developing new methods and software to model the structural dynamic characteristics of the rocket motors.

Baker and her staff hope to change existing engineering methods by providing better CAE methods and tools — leaving the more mundane tasks to the computer and allowing the engineer more time for creativity. Baker's leadership style, integrity, enthusiasm, hard work, and good judgment all have contributed to the success of WRO, and to her personal success.

A registered professional engineer in California, Baker is a member of ASME, AIAA, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa Phi. Her father, J.G. Baker, received a Distinguished Service Citation from the college in 1956. She is married to Dr. Wayne Pfeiffer, deputy director for research at the San Diego Supercomputer Center, and has two children, Betsy and Gordon.

GORDON F. BRUNNER

GORDON F. BRUNNER (Large image)

GORDON F. BRUNNER

Procter & Gamble's Senior Vice President in charge of worldwide research and development, Gordon F. Brunner, got his start in chemical engineering at UW-Madison. A 1961 graduate in biochemical engineering, Brunner began his career with Procter & Gamble as a food process development engineer.

Brunner continued his career with Procter & Gamble, moving into managerial positions and becoming the associate director of food products research in 1971. He managed a broad range of laundry and cleaning R&D operations in both the U.S. and Europe. In 1981, he was named manager of research and development for Procter & Gamble's European operations. He returned to the home office and became vice president of research and development in 1985. Within two years, Brunner was named a senior vice president. Last year he was elected to the board of directors.

During his early years with Procter & Gamble, Brunner earned an MBA at Xavier University, an institution that honored him with its Executive Achievement Award in 1991. He is a member of the American Oil Chemists Society and serves on the executive committee for the American Chemical Society's Campaign for Chemistry. He is also a board member of the Edison Biotechnology Center at Ohio University and the Ohio Council on Science and Technology. Brunner is the Cincinnati chair for the UW Foundation's Campaign for Wisconsin.

Brunner is married to Nadine Slosar and has three daughters, Christine, Pamela, and Meggan. He is active with the Cincinnati Museum of Natural History, Cincinnati's Christ Hospital, and the Cincinnati Council on World Affairs. He was corporate chair for the 1990-91 and 1991-92 United Way campaigns.

KEITH J. GARNETT

KEITH J. GARNETT (Large image)

KEITH J. GARNETT

As a civil engineer and an administrator, Keith J. Garnett has provided leadership to engineers, architects, and scientists in innovative public and private facilities design—from concept through construction. A native of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, he received his BS in civil engineering from UW-Madison in 1962. While working for the Army Corps of Engineers, he studied for his MS in engineering management at the University of Alaska, finishing the degree in 1966.

After a short stint with the Charmin Paper Company in 1966-67, Garnett joined Donohue & Associates, Inc. of Sheboygan, a 30-person firm, where he has held positions of increasing responsibility. As a project manager, he provided leadership over a six-year period for the $30 million Sheboygan Area Regional Wastewater Treatment System. He was responsible for formulating and initiating Donohue's participation in Milwaukee's multi-billion dollar Wastewater Pollution Abatement Program as part of a consortium of major firms. He directed the expansion programs of Donohue and Aero-Metric Engineering Inc., which took the organization from 400 employees in 1979 to more than 1,200 in 1991. He served as chairman of the board and chief executive officer during that period.

In 1991, the Donohue organization joined Wheelabrator Technologies Inc. Keith and his wife, Chris, currently live in London, where he is in charge of all international environmental engineering operations of the Wheelabrator Technologies International organization.

He is a member of numerous professional societies and a registered professional engineer in six states. He has served as chairman of the Design Professionals Coalition of the American Consulting Engineers Council and president of the Sheboygan Area UW-Alumni Club. His previous honors include a 1989 distinguished service award from the Wisconsin Section—ASCE.

The Garnett family includes their son, Craig, currently a senior at Purdue, their daughter, Leslie, her husband, Tom, and three grandchildren.

JOHN J. HREN

JOHN J. HREN (Large image)

JOHN J. HREN

John J. Hren's bachelor's degree in metallurgy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison led him to more schooling, and eventually to a position as head of North Carolina State's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. A Milwaukee native, Hren left UW-Madison with a BS in 1957. After a stint in law school, he worked at the U.S. Patent Office and opted to continue in engineering. He went on for an MS in metallurgy from the University of Illinois (1960), and a PhD in materials science from Stanford University (1962).

He was next appointed to National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellowships at the Max-Plank Institut in Stuttgart, (West) Germany, and the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. In 1964, he was hired as an assistant professor in the University of Florida Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering and was tenured in 1967.

As a researcher and teacher, Hren has been in high demand. He has been a visiting professor at Vanderbilt University, and a visiting scientist at CSIRO in Melbourne, Australia; Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M.; and Oak Ridge National Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tenn. In 1980, he spent a year as a Fulbright-Hays Lecturer in Materials Science at the Universities of Lisbon and Oporto in Portugal. In 1982, he founded the University of Florida's Major Analytical Instrumentation Center and served as its director until 1985, when he joined North Carolina State University.

Hren is a prolific author, having published more than 100 technical papers on microscopy and surface science. He co-authored one of the "bibles" of metallurgy, Elements of Physical Metallurgy. He has served as chairman of the Materials Science Division of the American Society of Metals and was a director and president of the Electron Microscopy Society of America. Since 1983, he has chaired the Steering Committee of the National Center for Electron Microscopy at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Recently, he helped organize the Materials Science degree program at the National Technological University and serves as the program's national chair.

Among his honors are his election as a Fellow with the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society for Metals.

JOHN T. HUSTON

JOHN T. HUSTON (Large image)

JOHN T. HUSTON

John T. Huston went into the automotive industry because of his love of cars and engines. Having joined Ford Motor Company in 1966, 26 years later, he is now vice president of Ford Europe's Powertrain Group.

Born and raised in Madison, Huston attended UW-Madison, receiving a mechanical engineering BS with honors in 1965 and an MS in 1966. He joined Ford as a research engineer, attracted to the company by the number of relatively young people he saw in positions of real responsibility. In the early years of his career, he was involved in some of the industry's initial work on anti-lock braking, four wheel/disc brakes, and hydraulic brake boosters.

Apart from a year in program management, his career with Ford has since been concentrated in the powertrain field, initially as an executive engineer in various areas of responsibility and then, from 1989-92, as Ford's Chief Engineer of Powertrain Engineering. Here, he led the design and development team for Ford car and truck programs in North America.

In 1992, Huston moved to Europe to his present position where he is responsible for Ford of Europe's powertrains. This is a new role in the Ford of Europe organization. He sees his first objective as blending an effective international team with a common vision. He is responsible for powertrain engineering activities in Britain and Germany and 12 manufacturing operations in Britain, Germany, Spain, and France.

Described by his colleagues as a concerned and conscientious leader, Huston is involved in the Ford College Graduate Program, has been a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) for 25 years, and serves on the UW-Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering Board of Visitors.

Having passed on his love of engineering to his children, his two daughters and son all are graduate engineers. During his European assignment, Huston and his wife, Sara, a business graduate of UW-Madison, will live near Ford of Europe's headquarters in Essex, England, where he hopes to be able to continue his spare-time interest in cars and offshore powerboats.

ALLEN A. KOZINSKI

ALLEN A. KOZINSKI (Large image)

ALLEN A. KOZINSKI

Allen A. Kozinski started his professional career with Amoco Oil Company and returned to employment there after being away for nearly 10 years.

Born in Chicago, Kozinski earned a BS in chemical engineering in 1963 from the University of Illinois. He then traveled to California to continue his studies, receiving an MS in 1965 from the University of California, Berkeley. Next, he joined Amoco working as a chemical engineer and remained there until 1968, when he came to UW-Madison. In 1971, he earned his PhD in chemical engineering.

Armed with a new doctorate, Kozinski became an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Illinois. In 1974, he left the academic life for the Quaker Oats Company to work as a section manager for process development.

But in 1977, he returned to Amoco, and this time stayed. Kozinski was a senior research engineer until 1981, when he became a director of strategic planning. He continued to accept managerial promotions from Amoco and served in a variety of areas such as technical service, oil movements, and process research.

In 1987, he became manager of the Salt Lake City Business Unit. Two years later, he was named vice president of research and development, a position he continues to hold.

Kozinski is a member of AIChE, the Industrial Research Institute, Inc., and Coordinating Research Council, Inc., where he also serves on the board of directors. He also is involved in the Auto/Oil Quality Improvement Research Program. Locally, he is a member of the DuPage County Junior Achievement Board.

KARL E. LONNGREN

KARL.E. LONNGREN (Large image)

KARL E. LONNGREN

In 1964, Karl E. Lonngren took a postdoctoral position with the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. When he returned to the U.S. the following year, he joined the faculty at the University of Iowa, and began a teaching and research program that would become internationally known.

Lonngren was born in South Milwaukee and attended UW-Madison, where he earned a BS (1960), an MS (1962), and a PhD (1964), all in electrical engineering. Upon taking his faculty position with the University of Iowa, he began studying and teaching in the areas of nonlinear wave propagation and plasma physics.

During his early career, Lonngren served as a visiting scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatchewan, Canada. In 1972, he was a visiting scientist at the Institute of Plasma Physics at Nagoya University in Nagoya, Japan.

Lonngren became a full professor at UI in 1972. He returned to UW-Madison in 1976 as a visiting professor. Through the years he has been a visiting scientist at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in New Mexico, the Institute of Space & Astronautical Science in Tokyo, and at the Danish Atomic Energy Commission.

His expertise in nonlinear wave propagation and plasma physics is well known. He has authored four texts and more than 150 journal articles, and has more than 80 conference papers to his credit.

He is a fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Recognized for his knowledge in the field of plasma science, Lonngren has organized sessions for several IEEE conferences on plasma science.

Lonngren has served as an editor and reviewer for several scholarly journals and books. A member of several engineering societies, he received a National Science Foundation Creativity Award in 1983, and a centennial medal in 1991 from the UW-Madison Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His wife, Vicki, is a 1963 graduate of UW-Madison. They have two children, Sondra and Jon.

ROBERT C. MIERENDORF

ROBERT C. MIERENDORF (Large image)

ROBERT C. MIERENDORF

Robert C. Mierendorf was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He graduated from UW-Madison in 1939 with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. After a career in the Army Signal Corps, Mierendorf returned to Milwaukee in 1946 to join the Square D Company. He retired from Square D in 1988 and currently resides in Brookfield, Wisconsin.

After joining Square D, Mierendorf held a number of positions, including chief engineer of the Control Division, manager of the Control Group Technical Center, and Director of International Standards.

Throughout his career, Mierendorf was awarded 29 patents, with significant "firsts" including: the first digital solid-state logic system; the first industrial proximity limit switch; modular designs of control relays and limit switches; and solid-state controllers for machine tools and positioning systems. He has published articles on topics including proximity switches, control systems, and insulation coordination for low-voltage equipment. He has chaired IEC committees leading to publication of IEC Safety Standards based on new research in this field. In this regard, he has presented numerous lectures in the U.S., Canada, and Europe.

Mierendorf is a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin, a member of Engineers and Scientists of Milwaukee, and a life fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Other honors include the 1983 James H. McGraw Award, the 1984 IEEE Standards Medallion, and the 1989 National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) Kite and Key Award.

Mierendorf has been active in a number of national professional organizations including the NEMA, the National Electric Code, IEEE, ANSI, and the U.S. National Committee of the IEC. He has been active in the town and city of Wauwatosa, serving on the local school board and the city council. He also has been active in church affairs and is a member of Mount Carmel Lutheran Church.

PETER R. SCHNEIDER

PETER R. SCHNEIDER (Large image)

PETER R. SCHNEIDER

Peter R. Schneider used an interest in electrical engineering to make his way into a long and successful career with IBM. A Milwaukee native, Schneider attended UW-Milwaukee (Extension) from 1957-1958. He transferred to UW-Madison in 1958, where he remained until 1966. While there, he received a BS, an MS, and ultimately, a PhD in electrical engineering. During his years at the university, Schneider worked at the engineering computer laboratory and as an instructor in the ECE department. He was also a fellow at the Engineering Experiment Station for two academic years and a research assistant for one.

It was during his graduate school summers, that Schneider first became acquainted with IBM. He was a summer engineer for IBM'S Data Systems Division Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

In 1966, with his PhD in hand, he joined IBM'S Yorktown Heights, N.Y., research division as a staff member specializing in high availability computer design. Three years later, he moved into a management position in error tolerant operating system design. Schneider held several other managerial positions at IBM before becoming vice president of development in 1989.

In his current position, Schneider is responsible for hardware, software, and technology development for all of IBM. He has written extensively in the area of fault tolerant computing. He holds nine patents related to topics in that area, including error checking and redundancy concepts for improved fault tolerant computer coding and circuit design.

Schneider is a member of numerous honorary and professional engineering societies including Eta Kappa Nu, Phi Eta Sigma, Sigma Xi, and Tau Beta Pi. He received a centennial medal in 1991 from the UW-Madison Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

PETER E. STARKWEATHER

PETER E. STARKWEATHER (Large image)

PETER E. STARKWEATHER

Peter E. Starkweather turned a 1959 BS into an enviable career as a consulting engineer and executive. President and CEO of Affiliated Engineers Inc. in Madison, Wisconsin, Starkweather has made a name for himself and the company, both nationwide and abroad.

Starkweather worked in Chicago for several years after graduating from UW-Madison with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. In 1963, he returned to Madison and joined Flad & Associates, a local architectural firm, soon becoming head of its small engineering department.

At Flad, Starkweather was able to pursue his interests in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), while slowly expanding the engineering department. By 1973, the engineering department had grown so large that it was able to take on outside clients. The department was renamed Affiliated Engineers Inc., and separately incorporated in 1978. It now does mechanical and electrical system design for clients throughout the U.S. and in several foreign countries. From a staff of five in 1963, the corporation has grown to over 140 employees with offices in five states. Affiliated Engineers counts among its clients Bausch & Lomb, Wisconsin Bell, American Family Insurance, Sentry Insurance, and the U.S. Air Force.

Under Starkweather's leadership, Affiliated Engineers has won significant recognition for its work. Awards include: a 1989 Governor's New Product Award, first place, division II; a 1989 Laboratory of the Year Award with high honors from R&D Magazine; several merit and honor awards from the Wisconsin chapter of AIA; and merit awards from the Illuminating Engineering Society.

Starkweather has implemented a quality management program at Affiliated Engineers which focuses on analysis, design, and construction phase services. This program has been nationally recognized and has served as the basis for significant repeat work from many Fortune 100 companies.

A registered professional engineer in 20 states, Starkweather is a member and past president of the Madison Chapter of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers, and a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers.

DAVID J. STORM

DAVID J. STORM (Large image)

DAVID J. STORM

Colleagues call David J. Storm one of the leading innovators in manufacturing today. His combined mechanical and industrial engineering studies gave him the basis for a successful manufacturing consulting career, one which often combines these two areas.

Storm received a BS in mechanical engineering with an industrial engineering option from UW-Madison in 1967. Following graduation, he began his professional career with Proctor & Gamble. His positions with the company included line supervisor, industrial engineer, and production department manager. In 1973, Storm joined Arthur Andersen & Co. in Milwaukee. He was promoted to manager in 1975 and elected to the partnership in 1981. In 1988, the Management Information Consulting Division of Arthur Andersen & Co. became the separate business unit of Andersen Consulting.

Storm currently fills several leadership roles at the company, including serving as a member of the firm's Manufacturing Industry Core Group and as a member of the Computer Integrated Manufacturing advisory committee. Storm also is a frequent speaker at professional symposia on issues of concern to manufacturing.

Storm's professional goals were interrupted and challenged in 1983 as he faced a personal health crisis. He was diagnosed with leukemia and eventually underwent a successful bone marrow transplant. Storm quickly resumed his work, returning to the forefront of industry advancements. Since his illness, he has been very active with the Wisconsin Chapter of the Leukemia Society of America. He presently serves on the Wisconsin Chapter's Board of Trustees.

He enjoys the opportunities his career offers to mentor and help with the development of young people. He would most like to be known for a "legacy of straight thinking." Storm has five children, ranging in age from 12 to 22, and he recently became a first-time grandfather.

RUDY J. TEKIPPE

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RUDY J. TEKIPPE

Since 1961, Rudy J. Tekippe's academic and career goals have focused on the environment. He received a BS in Civil engineering in 1965, and an MS in sanitary engineering in 1966, from Iowa State University. He then moved to Wisconsin where he completed his PhD in civil and environmental engineering at UW-Madison in 1970.

While working on his PhD, Tekippe joined James M. Montgomery Engineers Inc. (JMM) in Pasadena, California, where he is now Senior Vice President and Director of Technology. At JMM, he gained extensive experience in civil and environmental engineering with particular emphasis in water and wastewater treatment plant design, master planning, and studies related to water quality control. He went on to develop innovations in promoting water quality which result in a cleaner environment.

Since starting with JMM, Tekippe has served as manager of the company's laboratory department, manager of the wastewater department, manager of the Pasadena office, and as assistant chief engineer.

In these various positions, Tekippe has been responsible for designing several major public water supply treatment facilities and wastewater treatment plants. He has had major project management responsibility for numerous regional wastewater planning studies and has completed planning and research studies on industrial wastewater treatability, recreation lake management, and ground water mineralization quantification and control.

As director of technology, Tekippe has overall responsibility for quality control and engineering for the firm. He is the author of 27 technical papers and the author or co-author of three books.

A registered civil engineer in three states and professional engineer in one, Tekippe's professional society memberships include the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Water Works Association, Project Management Institute, and Australian Water and Wastewater Association.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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