1991 Award Recipients

DALE F. RUDD
Professor of Chemical Engineering
The 1991 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

WARREN E. STEWART
Professor of Chemical Engineering
The 1991 Byron Bird Award

WILLIAM W WUERGER
Associate Dean, Operations Professor, Engineering Professional Development
The 1991 Ragnar E. Onstad Award

RICHARD J. CASHWELL
Senior Lecturer, Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics
1991 Bollinger Academic Staff Award

HAROLD A. PETERSON
Professor Emeritus, Electrical and Computer Engineering
The ECE Department Centennial Citation

RONALD L. DAGGETT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DAVID H. EBER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

LYLE G. HASSEBROEK
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

LOWELL B. JACKSON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GAIL E. JANSSEN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

BRIAN L. JOINER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ERNEST S. MICEK
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN P. RIGGS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

MANFRED E. SUESS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HOWARD F. VOIGT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DAVID A. WOOLHISER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DALE F. RUDD

DALE F. RUDD (Large image)

DALE F. RUDD

This year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in the teaching of engineering students is Professor Dale F. Rudd. His qualifications for this award include what colleagues describe as a unique dedication to students and their understanding of the material. His rare combination of creative communication in the classroom and superb writing skills make Rudd a valued member of the Department of Chemical Engineering.

Praise from his colleagues is enthusiastic. One describes him as "that rare teacher who can change entirely the way a student approaches engineering design" as a result of "uncommon creativity combined with a remarkable clarity of communication.

"Dale's communication in the classroom is clear and direct. It is also elegant and often witty. His lectures are fun. Sometimes, the explanation is so beautifully organized and clearly stated that only later do you realize the true richness and complexity of the subject."

His students agree. Former students have called his classes some of "the most enjoyable in my college career" as a result of Rudd's "cheery disposition and willingness to teach" along with his "unique ability to simplify the complex technical material to a level that students can understand."

Rudd also teaches by writing. He has co-authored six books, many of them appearing in multiple editions. His books have drawn praise for their originality and timeliness—in the texts he creatively and quickly introduces the results of his research. All of his texts are widely acclaimed and read in such faraway places as the University of Twente in the Netherlands.

Support for this award is impressive. As one colleague notes, "Measure excellence in any aspect of teaching—as a lecturer, innovator, motivator, textbook writer—and Dale wins high marks."

Rudd received his BS and PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1956 and 1959, respectively. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a Slichter Professor of Engineering Research. Among other honors, he received the college's Byron Bird Award for Excellence in a Research Publication in 1988.

WARREN E. STEWART

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WARREN E. STEWART

The 1991 Byron Bird Award for excellence in a research publication goes to Professor Warren E. Stewart of the Department of Chemical Engineering.

He receives this award for his paper with John Villadsen on "Solution of Boundary-Value Problems by Orthogonal Collocation," which appeared in Chemical Engineering Science, 22, 1483-1501, (1967). This classic paper, the first in a series, has had a major influence on chemical engineering and on other engineering fields. Methods it outlines are used routinely now by engineers to perform complex computations.

The numerical technique described in the paper, called orthogonal collocation, has been called one of the most significant original contributions to numerical analysis ever made by a chemical engineer. Many chemical engineers say the technique has revolutionized the way they solve reaction engineering problems, with many modern collocation techniques owing their origins to Stewart's innovations. The concepts in the paper currently are taught to students at chemical engineering departments all over the world.

Stewart's other significant contributions to technical literature include five books and 90 research articles. He was a co-author with colleagues R.B. Bird and E.N. Lightfoot of Transport Phenomena, a 1960 text that continues to be widely cited and used.

Stewart did his undergraduate and master's work in chemical engineering at UW-Madison, earning a BS in 1945 and an MS in 1947. He studied for his chemical engineering doctorate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, earning his ScD in 1951. He joined Sinclair Research, Inc. in Harvey, Illinois, as a project engineer in 1950, leaving in 1956 to become a faculty member at UW-Madison.

Stewart was the first student to graduate from the UW-Madison College of Engineering with a straight-A record. He has received the Alpha Chi Sigma Research Award and Chemical Engineering Computing Award of AIChE, the Chemical Engineering Lectureship Award of ASEE, and the Murphree Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Award of ACS. He is a fellow of AIChE, an honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa, and a McFarland-Bascom Professor. He received the college's Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in teaching engineering students in 1981.

WILLIAM W WUERGER

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WILLIAM W WUERGER

The Ragnar E. Onstad Service to Society Award goes this year to Associate Dean William W. Wuerger for his significant contributions to engineering professional societies. He has had a long history of service to the Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers, a statewide professional organization. He was elected secretary/treasurer in 1966, and kept the post for three years. During this period, which was before WSPE had an executive director, he willingly carried out many of the duties normally assigned to paid staff members. In 1969, the executive director position was funded and filled. Wuerger became chair of the WSPE publications committee, working on other committees as well.

During these years, he also served in other capacities, including posts as treasurer, vice president, and eventually president of the Rock Valley Area chapter of the American Institute of Industrial Engineers. He was elected president of the Southwest chapter of WSPE in 1973.

He returned to the larger organization as WSPE's secretary in 1984, becoming president in 1987. Under his leadership, the society made great progress toward becoming the spokesgroup for the engineering profession in Wisconsin. His coworkers say he is "a thoughtful leader who displays a high degree of professionalism and integrity in all he undertakes" and "generous in donating his time and talent."

Wuerger's UW-Madison career began in 1961 when he joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering as an instructor and the UW-Extension Department of Engineering as a program director. He became acting chairman of the UW-Extension engineering department in 1966, associate chairman in 1967, and chairman in 1978. In 1979, he returned to teach in the Department of Mechanical Engineering while continuing to teach short courses for Extension.

Since 1985, Wuerser has served the college as Associate Dean of Operations and as a professor of Engineering Professional Development. A registered professional engineer in Wisconsin, he has been honored by the Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers. In 1981, he was named the Southwest Chapter's Engineer of the Year and received the UW-Extension Distinguished Service Award. He holds bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison. He and his wife, Mardelle, have three sons.

RICHARD J. CASHWELL

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RICHARD J. CASHWELL

Richard J. Cashwell is the winner of this year's Bollinger Academic Staff Distinguished Achievement Award. Cashwell, a senior lecturer in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics and director of the nuclear reactor lab, is cited for his exemplary and innovative contributions to the department, the college, and the teaching of engineering students.

Soon after he joined the department in 1962, Cashwell became solely responsible for the operation, maintenance, and upgrading of the nuclear reactor. His duties also include all equipment design, reactor and special nuclear material licensing and compliance, and operator recruitment and training. Much of this work is carried out under the critical surveillance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In over 25 years, the University of Wisconsin-Madison has received no significant safety violations.

Colleagues describe him as "the best reactor supervisor I have ever met... During my 13 years on the Reactor Safety Committee, I cannot recall a single instance in which his operation was a cause for concern to the NRC or the Safety Committee." Others comment on the outstanding reputation of the UW-Madison facility among nuclear professionals and add that Cashwell "should receive considerable credit for the establishment of that fine, high-quality reputation."

Cashwell's duties do not end with reactor supervision. He instructs undergraduates, graduate students, student workers, and utility employees in operations of the reactor, earning a reputation as an excellent trainer. His evaluation ratings from students have been consistently high—always above the department and college means—in part because he "makes the math and physics come alive."

Cashwell is a registered professional engineer and holds a BS in nuclear engineering from North Carolina State University. Before coming to UW-Madison in 1962, he worked for Lockheed Georgia Company and Lockheed Missiles & Space Co. He is a member of the American Nuclear Society, the Health Physics Society, and the Professional Reactor Operators Society. Cashwell has done consulting for many years in the reactor operator licensing area. He and his wife, Marilyn, have three grown daughters.

HAROLD A. PETERSON

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HAROLD A. PETERSON

The UW-Madison Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is celebrating its centennial this year. In honor of this occasion, the department has created a special centennial award given for distinguished serviced for teaching and research in electrical and computer engineering, and to the profession as a whole. The recipient of this award is Emeritus Professor Harold A. Peterson.

Born in Essex, Iowa, in 1908, Harold A. Peterson earned both a BS and an MS from the University of Iowa in 1932 and 1933, respectively. He spent a year as a research assistant at the university, leaving in 1934 to join General Electric Company. While at GE, he gained industrial experience with transients in power systems. He designed and built the first transient network analyzer.

After 12 years with GE, Peterson came to UW-Madison as a full professor of electrical engineering. A member of the electrical engineering faculty from 1946 until 1975, Peterson began a 20-year term as chairman of the department in 1947. In June of 1967, he was named to a new chair endowed by the Wisconsin Utilities Association, Professor of Electric Power Engineering. In 1974, he was awarded the Edward Bennett Distinguished Professorship. In 1961, he taught at the Technical University in Hanover, Germany, under a Fulbright Senior Lectureship.

His publications are many. Among books he co-authored is one he penned himself, "Transients in Power Systems," published in 1951 by John Wiley & Sons. The book still is used for research. Other publications include such subjects as a new approach to the study of simultaneous unbalances, a microwave thickness detector, and superconducting magnetic energy storage. He holds 12 patents.

Peterson is a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin and a member of numerous organizations including the following: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers, Inc., American Society for Engineering Education, National Society of Professional Engineers, and American Association of University Professors. He has served on countless committees.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 1957, he received the college's Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award. Peterson received the IEEE Education Gold Medal Award in 1978, while in 1984, he received the IEEE Centennial Medal.

Peterson retired from teaching in 1975, and he and his wife now divide their time between Pagosa Lakes, Colorado, and Green Valley, Arizona. The College of Engineering administers the Harold A. and Marion F. Peterson Scholarship Fund for electrical and computer engineering undergraduates.

RONALD L. DAGGETT

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RONALD L. DAGGETT

A Madison native, Ronald L. Daggett graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in mechanical engineering with a BS in 1938 and an MS in 1939. Daggett went to work in manufacturing/plastics at RCA in Camden, N.J., later moving to Blessing Associates in New York City. He returned to the Midwest at the conclusion of the war in 1945 as a design engineer for Ideal Industries in Sycamore, Ill. In 1946, he returned to the UW-Madison as an assistant professor of mechanical engineering.

He earned tenure and continued teaching in the areas of manufacturing and industrial plant design, plastics, and medical engineering, in both the regular curriculum and seminars. During this period, he developed a number of new plastic processes and co-developed an innovative prosthetic heart valve with Dr. Vincent Gott of the UW Medical School. This valve was used in several hundred heart patients over a four-year period.

In 1975, after 29 years of teaching, Daggett began a new career as an entrepreneur. He continues to engineer and develop injection molding techniques for small precision plastic parts at Engineering Industries, a Verona, Wisconsin, company he founded.

The firm offers consulting and design assistance, and has opened its facilities to students for visits, projects, and occasional classwork. The company has donated equipment to the university for educational use.

Engineering Industries has grown to be a leader in helping customers with innovative molding techniques and now employs about 100 people who serve more than 75 customers in several states.

Daggett regularly enjoys the game of squash, plays in a small orchestra, and is a dedicated weekend and vacation watercolorist who enjoys painting on location. Village streets, old mills, harbors, railyards, or the interior of the Capitol dome might become his studio.

Daggett and his wife, Dorothy, live in Madison. They have two grown children, Karen Wertymer and Lorin Daggett, and four grandchildren.

DAVID H. EBER

DAVID H. EBER (Large image)

DAVID H. EBER

David H. Eber put his education to work. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with two degrees in mechanical engineering—a BS in 1960 and an MS in 1961—Eber joined Caterpillar Tractor Company as a research engineer. While at Caterpillar, he designed the compressor section and accessory gear box for Cat's first production turbine engine.

In 1963, Eber joined The Trane Company, a heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning manufacturer in La Crosse, Wis. As a product development engineer, he designed Trane's first hi-speed centrifugal water chiller and the industry's first packaged, air-cooled centrifugal water chiller. After becoming engineering manager, he conceived and directed the development of a variety of new products including an advanced technology, three-stage centrifugal compressor used in large water chillers. Developed in 1973, this product still enjoys a 70 percent market share and is sold worldwide.

Eber continued to move through positions of increasing responsibility at The Trane Company including three appointments as vice president—in Product Development Engineering, Advanced Development Engineering, and currently, Engineering Technology. The Advanced Development Engineering group, which he formed, was responsible for developing Trane's microelectronic control capabilities and its advanced scroll and screw compressor technologies. These have made Trane a leader in commercial products technology with significant share and profit margin gains.

In his current position at Trane, Eber is responsible for all of the Commercial Systems Group's advanced product development, engineering laboratories, and the technologies related to compressors, heat transfer, and fluid flow.

Eber was elected to Phi Eta Sigma, Tau Beta Pi, and Pi Tau Sigma. He is a registered professional engineer in Wisconsin. In his career, he has registered 12 patents. Eber has served as a member and president of the La Crosse Lutheran Hospital Board of Trustees. He is currently on the American Refrigeration Institute's Committee for Large Water Chillers, and a member of the UW-Madison Mechanical Engineering Board of Visitors.

Eber and his wife, Susan, live in La Crosse. They have four grown children, Todd, Sandy, Teresa, and Alan.

LYLE G. HASSEBROEK

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LYLE G. HASSEBROEK

In a career spanning almost 30 years, Lyle G. Hassebroek has been instrumental in developing newer and better systems for wastewater treatment and hazardous waste disposal.

A 1963 graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison in civil engineering, Hassebroek joined CH2M HILL, Inc., a small consulting engineering firm in Corvallis, Oregon, the same year. Hassebroek joined CH2M HILL's Seattle office in 1965, and moved into positions of increasing responsibility, becoming regional manager of that office in 1978.

While in Seattle, Hassebroek organized CH2M HILL's first environmental sciences work, including its first water quality laboratory. He also helped develop improved waste treatment systems for several Washington cities and developed water quality studies for area watersheds.

In the mid 1970s, Hassebroek returned temporarily to his home state of Wisconsin to direct a wastewater treatment and sludge utilization program for the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District. This program, which uses sludge as fertilizer for local farmers, has served as a model for cities and utilities across the nation.

Hassebroek was promoted to CH2M HILL's Northwest District Manager in 1980 and Eastern District Manager in 1983, the latter appointment taking him to Atlanta, Georgia, where he was responsible for company operations in 22 states. He became active in CH2M HILL's hazardous waste services which have included projects involving the EPA Superfund Program and the DOE Environmental Restoration Program.

In 1990, after 27 years with the company, Hassebroek became president of CH2M HILL, Inc., headquartered in Denver. As president, he is responsible for the overall operations of a consulting engineering firm with more than 4,000 employees in over 50 locations throughout the U.S.

A registered professional engineer in seven states, Hassebroek is a member of the American Public Works Association, the Water Pollution Control Federation, Triangle Fraternity, and Chi Epsilon. He and his wife, June Ann, are natives of Wisconsin and have two grown children.

LOWELL B. JACKSON

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LOWELL B. JACKSON

Lowell B. Jackson's career spans more than three decades of military, university, and government service, as well as private practice. A native of Wisconsin, Jackson earned a bachelor's degree in communications, and bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering, all from Purdue University. His university studies were interrupted by several years of active duty as an Army Corps of Engineers officer.

In 1957, Jackson became an instructor of civil engineering at Purdue, and in 1965, he joined the faculty of the Department of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Wisconsin-Extension, now the UW-Madison Department of Engineering Professional Development. He was one of the department's pioneers in the design, production, and delivery of engineering education in wire, broadcast, and videotape formats.

Jackson left his position as an associate professor in 1978 and began a decade of government leadership. He served twice as Wisconsin's Secretary of Transportation, and as the state's Secretary of Industry, Labor, and Human Relations. In 1982, he was a candidate for governor of Wisconsin. He also served as Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Highways and as Deputy Administrator of the Federal Highway Administration.

Jackson is past chairman of the Transportation Research Board's executive committee and served for many years on the board of directors of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. In 1987, the American Society of Civil Engineers presented him with its Civil Government Award, and in 1988, its President's Medal, in recognition of his service to the profession as a member of the National Council on Public Works Improvement. In 1984, Purdue University gave him a Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award.

Jackson is now a vice president and principal-in-charge of the transportation and structures disciplines for Greenhorne & O'Mara, Inc., an engineering/architecture consulting firm headquartered in Maryland. He and his wife, Joan, live in Arlington, Virginia.

GAIL E. JANSSEN

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GAIL E. JANSSEN

Gail E. Janssen's career has moved from farming to agricultural engineering, and then to banking. After eight years of dairy farming in northeastern Wisconsin, he came to UW-Madison in 1957 to study agriculture, concentrating in agricultural engineering. He earned a BS in 1960, followed by a BS in mechanical engineering in 1962.

Janssen began his engineering career as a design engineer for Gehl Co. in West Bend, Wisconsin, where he was soon promoted to assistant chief engineer. While at Gehl, he designed a new self-propelled forage harvester and developed a new concept of cut and throw forage harvesters.

He continued to design innovative machinery for farm use after moving to Badger Northland Inc., a manufacturer of agricultural and industrial equipment in Kaukauna, Wisconsin. He holds five patents relating to improvements in farm equipment. He was promoted to president and general manager of Badger in 1971.

In 1978, Janssen left Badger Northland to take a position as president and chairman of the board for F&M Bank in Kaukauna. Two years later he initiated the formation of F&M Bancorporation, Inc., becoming its president and chairman. Under his leadership F&M Bancorporation, headquartered in Kaukauna, has grown from $30 million in assets in 1980, to $430 million in 1991, with 11 banks and 22 offices.

While at F&M, Janssen was approached by Badger Northland employees to arrange a buyout. Janssen negotiated the acquisition and formed an investment group to purchase Badger. Today, Badger is a prospering employee-owned company and the second largest employer in the community. Janssen currently serves as board chair.

Active in professional and community organizations, Janssen has served on financial committees for the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) and is currently its treasurer. A registered professional engineer, he is a member of the Agricultural Engineering Industry Advisory Committee for UW-Madison and the Wisconsin Agricultural and Life Sciences Alumni Association.

Janssen has been honored by numerous organizations, among them the Wisconsin section of the ASAE, 4-H, the Outagamie County Bankers' Association, and the UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Janssen, a Wisconsin native, and his wife, Janice, reside in Kaukauna.

BRIAN L. JOINER

BRIAN L. JOINER (Large image)

BRIAN L. JOINER

Brian L. Joiner was not content with one degree. After earning a BS from the University of Tennessee in industrial engineering, he worked at Green Giant over the summer, then returned to the university to earn an MS in accounting the next year.

He then went on to Rutgers University where he received an MS and a PhD in statistics. Along the way, he worked a summer for Cities Service Oil in operations research.

After completing his master's in 1963, Joiner took a position as a consulting statistician for the National Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C., and Gaithersburg, Maryland. In 1969, he became the head consulting statistician for that organization in Boulder, Colorado.

Joiner began his teaching career in 1971 when he joined the Pennsylvania State University as an associate professor and director of statistical consulting. He came to UW-Madison in 1974 as the statistician-in-residence at the statistical laboratory. In less than a year, he was named director of the laboratory, a post he kept until 1982.

In 1979, Joiner was named a professor of statistics at UW-Madison. He taught at the university until 1983 when he and his wife, Laurel W. Joiner, formed Joiner Associates, Inc., a management consulting firm in Madison. Joiner Associates is considered by many to be at the forefront of the nation's quality movement.

Joiner is an established leader in the quality movement. He is one of nine judges for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, having aided in the development of the award criteria. In 1987, he won the Deming Medal, an award from the American Society for Quality Control. Through contributions to software programs such as OMNITAB and MINITAB, he has played a key role in integrating statistical methods into U.S. business.

His list of publications is extensive. A member of numerous professional and honorary societies, he has been or is particularly active in the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the International Statistical Institute, and the American Statistical Association in which he holds honorary fellow status.

ERNEST S. MICEK

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ERNEST S. MICEK

Ernest S. Micek and Cargill, Inc. have had a long and prosperous relationship. Born in northwestern Wisconsin, Micek attended UW-Madison, graduating with a BS in chemical engineering in 1959. He started work with Cargill that year and never left.

Cargill, Inc. is a large private international corporation that processes commodities such as grains and oilseeds into products such as corn syrup, vegetable oils, citric acid, and corn starch. Micek joined Cargill as a production supervisor trainee in a vegetable oil processing plant in Norfolk, Virginia. In 1961, he was promoted to plant superintendent of Cargill's soybean processing plant in Wichita, Kansas.

Micek continued to move up in the Cargill organization, and in that process, spent two years as a technical plant manager in Tarragona, Spain. In 1970, he became manager of the corn milling department in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Cargill's milling operation grew from 10,000 bushels a day to more than 700,000 bushels under Micek's supervision.

He currently serves as president of the cornmilling division with responsibility for all facets of Cargill's North and South American corn milling business. Largely because of his leadership, Cargill has become the second largest corn processor in the world. During his career with Cargill, Micek's innovative contributions have helped to advance the use of corn-derived products in countless industries.

Micek serves on Cargill's corporate management committee and the public policy committee. He is a member of the Corn Refiners Association Board of Directors and the American Management Association.

He is active in the Greater Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce and the U.S.-Canada Committee on Trade Relations. While at Cargill, he has chaired committees for the United Way, the Minnesota Special Olympics, and the International Special Olympics.

Micek also serves on the board of directors of Schneider National, a private trucking and transportation company, with headquarters in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Micek and his wife, Sally, live in Edina, Minnesota. They have four children and five grandchildren. Ernie enjoys a river home on the Mississippi just north of La Crosse, Wisconsin. He enjoys fishing, most sports, and jazz music.

JOHN P. RIGGS

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JOHN P. RIGGS

John P. Riggs graduated from UW-Madison in 1959 with a BS in chemical engineering. Four years later, he left Cornell University with a PhD in the same field. After a period as an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University, Riggs took an industrial position.

He joined Celanese Corporation in 1965 as a research engineer and quickly moved up in the organization, holding a number of technical and business development-related positions. In 1987, Celanese Corporation became Hoechst Celanese Corporation (HCC), and in 1988, Riggs was named Vice President of the Research Division and Managing Director of the Robert L. Mitchell Technical Center.

Hoechst Celanese is a Fortune 100 international industrial, based in the U.S. A part of the Hoechst Group, Hoechst Celanese operates a broad spectrum of chemistry and materials-related businesses with an international customer base. In the research division, Riggs participates in new business development involving advanced materials and chemical intermediates.

The Robert L. Mitchell Technical Center, with a staff of 500, is the larger of the two corporate R&D centers within HCC, with a focus on advanced materials research and development in a highly interdisciplinary, multifunctional environment.

Riggs has a number of patents and publications in the general area of materials science and engineering, gives frequent invited presentations on technology and management in this field, and continues to write about these subjects.

A member of numerous professional and honorary societies, Riggs also has donated his time to organizations such as the National Materials Advisory Board, the industrial advisory boards of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of California at Berkeley, and the Conference Board International Council on Management of Innovation and Technology. He has been a consulting editor for the AIChE Journal in the materials area.

He serves locally on the Rutgers University Science Advisory Council and the Rutgers Industrial Advisory Board for the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. He also has served on the board of directors of Ceramic Process Systems, Inc. and currently is on the board of directors of Inrad.

MANFRED E. SUESS

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MANFRED E. SUESS

In 1978, Manfred E. Suess founded Technimet Corporation, a one-man metallurgical investigation firm operating out of rented basement space. Today, Technimet is one of the outstanding, growing metallurgical investigative services in the country.

Now located in modern facilities in New Berlin, Wisconsin, Technimet employs a team of experts who specialize in metallurgical design, failure analysis, cost reduction, and scanning electron microscopy. Because Suess and the other specialists often diagnose the cause of metal fatigue and failure, the company has become known as "the Quincy of Metals," after Jack Klugman's TV coroner. Technimet staff members also give expert testimony in metallurgical stress and failure lawsuits, and present seminars to other engineers.

German-born, Suess graduated in the upper 10 percent of his 1964 UW-Madison engineering class, receiving a BS in metallurgical engineering. A member of Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi, he earned his UW-Madison master's degree in the same field the next year and joined the Caterpillar Tractor Company as a college trainee. In 1970, he left Caterpillar to manage materials engineering at Koehring Company. Eight years later, he founded Technimet.

A registered professional engineer in Wisconsin, Suess is a member of the American Welding Society (AWS) and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). He is a fellow of and has served the ASM-International, the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE).

Suess is a contributing author of the Welding Handbook, Vol. 1, AWS, 1976, and joint author of Steel Selection, John Wiley & Sons, 1979. He has also presented papers, lectures, and seminars to engineering societies and has served as a college course instructor.

In 1989, Suess was selected by the New Berlin Chamber of Commerce as the Business Person of the Year. In 1990, he was inducted to the Milwaukee Chapter ASM International Hall of Fame for distinguished contributions to the materials engineering profession.

Active in church and community affairs, Suess enjoys working with young people and the elderly. He and his wife, Gail, have six children.

HOWARD F. VOIGT

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HOWARD F. VOIGT

Except for a stint with the competition, Howard F. Voigt has made a career with Ford Motor Company. His teenage interest in gasoline-powered and pulse jet model airplanes and motorcycles led to undergraduate studies at UW-Madison in mechanical engineering. He graduated in 1956 with a bachelor's degree.

Chrysler Corporation recruited Voigt for the Chrysler Institute's Master of Science in Automotive Engineering. He began work for Chrysler in 1956 and completed the program in 1958. While working in Dodge truck development, test, and design, Voigt completed a master's program in mechanical engineering at Wayne State University.

In 1964, he joined the Ford Motor Company as a product design engineer in the Overseas Product Engineering Office. He moved through various positions of responsibility at Ford before becoming manager of overseas product engineering. In 1972, he was promoted to vehicle engineering manager in charge of new vehicle concepts. In this position, he was responsible for all new vehicle designs including Fiesta, Fairmont, Crown Victoria, and Lincoln Town Car.

Voigt was promoted to executive engineer in 1975 and went on to take responsibility for all vehicle engineering of the Taurus/Sable program. In 1986, he became chief engineer for advanced vehicle engineering in North American Automotive Operations and developed the advanced design for Ford's second "world car".Tempo, Topaz, and Ford of Europe's Sierra to be introduced in 1994. Since 1987, Voigt has been the chief engineer for the Overseas Product Engineering Office of Ford's International Operations.

During his early years at Ford, Voigt began and completed an MBA program at the University of Michigan, graduating in 1971. He has kept close ties with the academic community through participation on the Wayne State University Industrial Advisory Committee and the UW-Madison College of Engineering Industrial Liaison Council. A registered professional engineer, he is active in the Society of Automotive Engineers. He is an avid collector and restorer of high performance and special interest Ford products.

He and his wife, Beverly, have three grown children and have lived in Dearborn, Michigan, for 35 years.

DAVID A. WOOLHISER

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DAVID A. WOOLHISER

David A.Woolhiser is an expert in hydrology and hydro-meteorology. Born in La Crosse, Wisconsin, he attended UW-Madison, earning bachelor's degrees in both civil engineering and agriculture in 1955. He joined the University of Arizona the same year as an instructor and assistant agricultural engineer.

In 1958, Woolhiser took a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a hydraulic engineer in the Agricultural Research Service (ARS). Over the following years, he was stationed at Tombstone, Arizona; Madison, Wisconsin, and Columbia, Missouri. During this time, he completed an MS at the University of Arizona and a PhD at UW-Madison, both in civil engineering. For his PhD, he minored in meteorology and geophysics.

Woolhiser joined the faculty of Cornell University in 1963 as an assistant professor of civil engineering. He remained at Cornell until 1967 when he returned to the USDA-ARS where he became the research leader for a hydrology research group in Fort Collins, Colorado. He also served as a faculty affiliate in civil engineering for Colorado State University.

Woolhiser continued work in Fort Collins until 1981 when he transferred to the USDA-ARS facility in Tucson, Arizona. Until recently, he served as the USDA's research leader for the aridland watershed management research unit. He is also an adjunct professor in the University of Arizona's Department of Hydrology and Water Resources.

Woolhiser is recognized around the world for his expertise in hydraulics, hydrology, and hydrometeorology. He has authored or co-authored more than 110 papers on these subjects and has received numerous honors, including election to the National Academy of Engineering. A leader in numerical modeling of surface runoff, he has pioneered the dominant approach now used in science and engineering.

A fellow of the American Geophysical Union, that organization honored him with the Horton Award for research in hydrology in 1983. He is also a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

Woolhiser and his wife, Kathryn, have three children, Carl, Curt, and Lisa. He plans to retire this fall after 30 years with the USDA. In retirement he plans to spend time drawing, painting, and resharpening his fishing skills.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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