1989 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

I. MARTIN ISAACS
Department of Mathematics
The 1989 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

MAX G. LAGALLY
Materials Science and Engineering
The 1989 Byron Bird Award

EDNOR M. ROWE
1989 Bollinger Academic Staff Award

WALTER G. BELTER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOSE COCA PRADOS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HOWARD E. JORDAN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES P. KEATING
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROGER E. KREMPEL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RICHARD JOHN SCHWARTZ
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

S. HERBERT STONE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAN KAROL VER HAGEN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GOERGE R. WERNISCH
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

I. MARTIN ISAACS

I. MARTIN ISAACS (Large image)

I. MARTIN ISAACS

Mathematics Professor I. Martin Isaacs is this year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in teaching of engineering students.

Isaacs is the coordinator of the Mathematics Department's calculus sequence, an important series of courses for many engineering majors. This sequence is a prerequisite not only for further mathematics study, but also for courses in physics and several engineering departments.

In support of his nomination for this award, one student cited Isaacs' ability to captivate and entertain his students while educating them. "He judges his ability to teach based on his students' understanding, an important point of feedback that many overlook. While Dr. Isaacs has a very busy schedule, he is very approachable. He takes time before and after class, as well as carrying on impromptu lectures in his office in an effort to clarify lecture material or questions of interest. In this way, he bridges the gap between professor and student."

Isaacs is known throughout the state as director of the annual Wisconsin Mathematics, Engineering and Science Talent Search. This program has been instrumental in identifying junior high and high school students who should be encouraged toward careers in a scientific field. Under the program, students are sent sets of mathematical problems that are of a very different type than those they typically encounter in the classroom. Rather than testing specific knowledge, the problems test insight, ingenuity, creativity, and perseverance. The top problem solvers are invited to Madison for an awards banquet each spring.

In addition to his teaching, Isaacs is a prolific researcher and author. One of his strongest research interests is character theory, and he is the author of a textbook on the subject, Character Theory of Finite Groups (Academic Press, 1976). He has delivered invited addresses on mathematics in countries around the world, including Australia, New Zealand, England, and West Germany.

He received his BS in mathematics from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in 1960. He received his AM and PhD in mathematics from Harvard University in 1961 and 1964, respectively. His awards include a Sloan Research Fellowship in 1971, and a UW-Madison Distinguished Teaching Award in 1985. He was an instructor and visiting assistant professor of mathematics at the University of Chicago from 1966-69. He joined the UW-Madison faculty as an associate professor in 1969, and was promoted to full professor in 1971.

MAX G. LAGALLY

MAX G. LAGALLY (Large image)

MAX G. LAGALLY

Max G. Lagally receives the 1989 Byron Bird Award for excellence in research publication for his work on the structure and crystallography of surfaces.

Surfaces of and interfaces between materials have a wide-ranging technological impact in such areas as corrosion and wear protection, catalysis, electronic devices, and energy and resource conservation. Structure and crystallography are fundamental to all other surface properties. Early in his career, when others were still interpreting surface chemical, electronic, and transport properties explicitly or implicitly in terms of structurally perfect surfaces, Lagally recognized the importance of surface disorder in influencing these properties. He also recognized the importance of distinguishing different forms of surface disorder and providing quantitative descriptions of them. He is also known for his studies of the thermodynamics of phase transformations in surfaces and thin films.

In support of Lagally's nomination for this award, Dr. J.E. Houston of Sandia National Laboratories, a well-known surface scientist, praised Lagally's series of papers on two-dimensional phase transitions in thin layers of oxygen adsorbed in a tungsten metal surface: "This work was both the model and the standard by which virtually all subsequent surface phase transition studies have been compared. As a result of its careful conception and execution, Lagally's work established the veracity of such measurements for this purpose. The truly impressive thing about this pioneering work concerns the breadth of its impact — from general phase-transition theory to interactions of surface species to the technology of performing surface structure analyses by electron diffraction techniques."

Lagally received his BS in physics from the Pennsylvania State University in 1963. He received his MS in physics in 1965, and his PhD in solid-state physics in 1968, both from UW-Madison. He served as a research associate and instructor in UW-Madison's physics department from 1970-71. In 1971, he became an assistant professor of materials science in the College of Engineering. He was promoted to associate professor in 1974, and full professor in 1977.

He had a major influence on the early development and growth of the Materials Science Program in the 1970s. He played a major role in establishing the college's extensive surface characterization facilities, as well as in setting up the Thin-Film Deposition and Applications Center. He currently serves as director of the center.

A favorite project of Lagally's is his work with the university's College of Kids, a summer program for gifted and talented children. He developed and teaches an on-going class for the program in high-technology materials.

In 1986, he was awarded a UW-Madison John Bascom Professorship in surface science and technology. He also received a Sloan Foundation Fellowship from 1973-77, and was among the first at UW-Madison to receive an H.I. Romnes Junior Faculty Fellowship in 1976. He is a fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Australian Institute of Physics, and is a registered professional engineer in the State of Wisconsin.

EDNOR M. ROWE

EDNOR M. ROWE (Large image)

EDNOR M. ROWE

The first recipient of the Bollinger Academic Staff Achievement Award is Ednor M. Rowe, in recognition of his outstanding technical contributions to the success of the college's programs in materials science, accelerator science and technology, and x-ray lithography.

X-ray lithography is expected to be necessary in making the next generation of computer chips. Besides getting more information on each chip, the precision of x-ray exposure should result in more usable chips per silicon wafer (higher yields). Rowe played a fundamental role in the development of modern synchrotron radiation research, and in the establishment of the university's Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) as the premier such facility in the U.S.

SRC is a national resource for the development of x-ray lithography since its source, Aladdin, has the ideal spectrum for x-ray lithography. Aladdin's existence led to the establishment of the college's Center for X-ray Lithography, which has an annual budget of more than $3 million. The center's existence was key to the college obtaining the SEMATECH Center of Excellence in X-ray Lithography, and the DARPA X-ray Lithography Development contract.

During the long and difficult struggle in the commissioning of Aladdin, Rowe did not lose faith in the innovative technical solutions that were criticized by many of his colleagues. The final, tremendous success of Aladdin has clearly demonstrated the merit of such solutions.

Aladdin's development is the most recent in the impressive series of Rowe's scientific achievements. He also had a fundamental role in the development of Tantalus, the first SRC source. With Tantalus, Rowe pioneered the concept of dedicating a storage ring to synchrotron radiation research. For 18 years, Tantalus was one of the most productive sources of synchrotron radiation in the world. This productivity was a direct result of its unmatched reliability, and Rowe deserves full credit for this achievement.

Thanks to the technical expertise and continued dedication of Ednor M. Rowe, the most advanced American semiconductor industries have the opportunity to develop some of the key technological components needed to overcome foreign competition.

Rowe received his BS in physics from Purdue University in 1955, and did graduate work there from 1955-57. He first joined UW-Madison's staff in 1967 as an associate scientist in its Physical Sciences Laboratory. He became chief scientist of that unit in 1975. In 1970 he became director of the Synchrotron Radiation Center, and now serves as its associate director for accelerator development. He has also served as a lecturer in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics since 1967.

WALTER G. BELTER

WALTER G. BELTER (Large image)

WALTER G. BELTER

Walter G. Belter has devoted nearly all of his professional life to the technical development of environmentally safe high and low level radioactive waste treatment and disposal systems.

In 1955, he took a position as a nuclear decontamination engineer at Wright Air Development Center. There, he worked on design and construction of radioactive waste handling facilities for a materials test reactor, built as part of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program.

In 1957, he became environmental engineer and, in 1961, chief of the environmental and sanitary engineering branch of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Division of Reactor Development. He directed research and development for treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, conducting related environmental studies. He also worked as a consultant with the International Atomic Energy Agency, and participated in numerous technical exchanges with the USSR and many European countries.

He later served as assistant director of the Department of Energy's Division of Technology Overview, where he directed a large-scale regional assessment program for evaluation of the environmental and social impacts of energy sources including coal, nuclear, hydropower, geothermal, oil, gas, solar and wind. He retired from DOE in 1978.

After retirement, he served as senior executive consultant to the NUS Corporation of Gaithersburg, Maryland. He assisted in assessment and evaluation of siting, construction and operation of the first deep geological repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes from the commercial nuclear power industry.

He received his BS and MS in civil engineering from UW-Madison in 1949 and 1950, respectively. He is a member of the American Nuclear Society, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the Federal Water Quality Association, the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Conference of Federal Environmental Engineers. He is also a registered professional engineer in Indiana. He and his wife reside in Kensington, Maryland and Tucson, Arizona.

JOSE COCA PRADOS

JOSE COCA PRADOS (Large image)

JOSE COCA PRADOS

Jose Coca Prados, an internationally-prominent chemical engineer and educator, is recognized for outstanding contributions in the application of scientific principles to problems of industrial development.

He first came to Wisconsin in 1968 after finishing his doctorate at the University of Salamanca, Spain. He worked as a post doctoral scientist and as a teacher in the undergraduate program of the Department of Chemical Engineering. Since then, he has been a visitor to the department almost yearly and Wisconsin faculty have visited him in Spain.

He is internationally recognized for his contributions in forming a scientific foundation for industrial processes in a variety of fields. These include the industrial application of gas chromatography, the separation of metals and bioproducts, the development of enriched nitrogen fertilizers from coal and biomass, and the development of fundamental data on vapor liquid equilibrium.

He has served on the faculty of the University of Oviedo, Spain, since 1972, where he is chairman of the chemical engineering department. He has lectured and taught extensively abroad, including Great Britain, Germany Portugal, Norway, Israel, and the United States.

He and his wife, Hanna, live in Oviedo, and have three children: Andrzej, Yola, and Tomek.

HOWARD E. JORDAN

HOWARD E. JORDAN (Large image)

HOWARD E. JORDAN

Howard Jordan has worked for Reliance Electric Company of Cleveland, Ohio, for more than 30 years. He began as a staff engineer assisting in the design and development of rotating electrical machinery development. His projects included a T frame NEMA motor redesign, an energy efficient XE motor product line, a noncontacting permanent magnet brake, a high frequency alternator, and a cycloconverter drive for ship rudder control.

In 1984, he transferred to the company's Corporate R & D Division, serving as manager. His areas of responsibility include electrical design, custom integrated circuit design and fabrication, hybrid circuit development, servo motors, and optics for industrial inspection.

The holder of five U.S. patents, Jordan is a registered professional engineer in the State of Ohio, and a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He is also author of the book "Energy Efficient Electric Motors and their Application."

He received his BS in electrical engineering from UW-Madison in 1946. He received his MS and PhD in electrical engineering from Case Western Reserve University in 1958 and 1962, respectively. He lives in Cleveland, Ohio.

JAMES P. KEATING

JAMES P. KEATING (Large image)

JAMES P. KEATING

Born in Neenah, Wisconsin, in 1907, James P. Keating had a 53-year career with one of that city's most important companies, the Neenah Foundry.

Entering the field without a college degree, Keating attended engineering night school and taught himself via the Harvard Classics and technical literature. He began working at the foundry at age 17, becoming a partner at age 21, and secretary-treasurer at age 24.

In 1950, he was named vice president of production and, in 1961, vice president of engineering and development. He retired from the company in 1977, at the age of 70.

His achievements helped Neenah Foundry become an international leader in the production of construction castings. His innovations resulted in equipment and plant design improvements that increased productivity from 15-20 castings per day to 1000 tons of castings daily. He invented the first non-rocking manhole cover, an aircraft mooring device for air terminals, and stocker and boiler components used by most coal fired utilities. His plant and equipment designs have been copied extensively worldwide.

He also has been prominent in promoting technical education, serving as president of the Foundry Education Foundation and the National Foundry Association. He also has served as president of the Vocational School Board of Neenah for over 20 years. He has been a significant fundraiser for scholarships to universities and colleges, including UW-Madison. He resides in Neenah, Wisconsin.

ROGER E. KREMPEL

ROGER E. KREMPEL (Large image)

ROGER E. KREMPEL

Roger Krempel has a long record of distinguished achievement in engineering. Immediately after receiving his BS in civil engineering from UW-Madison in 1950, he designed the city airport at Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

In 1951, he became a city engineer for Janesville, Wisconsin. While working for Janesville, he was in charge of engineering the public facilities to accommodate the city's doubling size. For this achievement, he was named one of the nation's top ten public works men by the American Public Works Association.

In 1975, he moved to Ft. Collins, Colorado, where he constructed the city's high mountain reservoir. He doubled the capacity of water and wastewater treatment plants and established innovative water conservation and reuse programs along with using wastewater sludge as a resource. In addition, he established a stormwater utility and a pavement management program, both among the first in the nation. In 1984, he created a city Department of Natural Resources to establish a local focus on environmental protection and resource recovery. He served as director until his retirement in 1988.

Krempel has served as a lecturer and instructor for programs in the Department of Engineering Professional Development since 1965. Programs he has been involved with include topics such as public works inspection, highways, solid waste, recycling, and environmental engineering.

Born in New Berlin, Wisconsin, graduated from Waukesha high School, Krempel and his wife Shirley reside in Ft. Collins, Colorado. They have three children: John, Sara and Peter.

RICHARD JOHN SCHWARTZ

RICHARD JOHN SCHWARTZ (Large image)

RICHARD JOHN SCHWARTZ

Richard Schwartz began his career as an engineer for RCA Laboratories, where he worked on new solid state devices. In 1962, he was the co-founder of Energy Conversion, Inc., where he was responsible for the development of thermoelectric materials and devices.

His career path then led to higher education, and he joined the electrical engineering faculty at Purdue University in 1964. From 1972 until 1983, he was assistant head for instruction in the School of Electrical Engineering, and since 1985 has served as its head. His research interests include solid state devices, most recently developing numerical models for solar cells. He has authored more than 90 journal articles, conference papers and technical reports, and consults extensively in the solar cell design area. He is also a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Schwartz received his BS in electrical engineering from UW-Madison in 1957. He received his SM and ScD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959 and 1962, respectively. Born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, he resides in Lafayette, Indiana.

S. HERBERT STONE

S. HERBERT STONE (Large image)

S. HERBERT STONE

From 1936 to 1967, S. Herbert Stone worked for the John S. Barnes Corp. in Rockford, Illinois, rising to vice president of the Constant Flo Pump Division.

In 1968 he started his own company, Stone Hydraulic Industries Inc., serving as its chairman and CEO until his retirement in 1984. His work included the development, manufacture, and sale of specialty hydraulic pumps and power units. He pioneered a fixed clearance gear pump design using an innovative batch matched manufacturing process. He built the first mass produced high pressure pump using powdered metals.

Application of the company's product include material handling devices, man lifts, automotive service station lifts, door operating units, and truck tail gates. Within 10 years, the company's sales and profits grew from the smallest to the largest in their field. In 1980, he sold the company to J.H. Fenner Limited in Hull, England. The company and products continue today as Fenner Fluid Power.

Stone received his BS in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in 1943. He has belonged to the Society of Automatic Engineers for over 40 years, and to the American Society of Swedish Engineers for over 30 years. He served for two years on the Department of Commerce District Export Council, and currently is a member of the University of Wisconsin Bascom Hill Society.

Born in Orebro, Sweden, Stone is married to Ruth Tomlinson, a 1943 UW-Madison graduate in geology. They reside on Sand Key, Clearwater Beach, Florida, in the winter, and at Lauderdale Lakes, Wisconsin, during the summer.

JAN KAROL VER HAGEN

JAN KAROL VER HAGEN (Large image)

JAN KAROL VER HAGEN

Jan Karol Ver Hagen joined Emerson Electric Company in May 1977 as a corporate vice president and executive vice president, international, for the Emerson A. B. Chance Division. In 1978, he was named president of Emerson's White-Rodgers Division and in 1979, elected a corporate group vice president. He was elected a corporate executive vice president in 1984, and appointed chairman of Emerson's Electronics and Space Division in 1986. In 1988 he was elected a vice chairman of the Emerson board of directors. He is currently a member of the Office of the Chief Executive, a vice chairman, and a director of Emerson.

Prior to joining Emerson, he was vice president and general manager of the International Division of the Trane Company.

He received his BS in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in January, 1961. He currently serves the College of Engineering as a member of its Industrial Liaison Council. He is married and has three children. He resides in St. Louis, Missouri.

GOERGE R. WERNISCH

GOERGE R. WERNISCH (Large image)

GOERGE R. WERNISCH

George Wernisch provided the engineering, marketing, and executive expertise that helped the CECO Corporation generate over $200 million in sales in 1971. He was an early advocate of increasing the spans of concrete structural members, expanding load tables, and developing additional load tables for other concrete structural systems in the Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute (CRSI) design handbook.

His leadership at CECO helped expand the use and increase the sales of poured-in-place concrete joist, dome, and slab construction in the non-residential construction market. He also was an early leader in the application of short span steel joists in non-residential construction and later in the publication of load tables and design specifications for the long span steel joist.

He joined CECO in 1937, retiring as president in 1971. He also was a member of CECO's board of directors from 1957-1971. When he retired, CECO was operating three steel mills, 20 rebar and steel joist fabricating plants, and more than 20 concrete forming equipment storage and reconditioning yards. It also operated additional facilities to manufacture pre-engineered metal buildings, precast concrete products, metal doors, and windows. Over 30 district sales and engineering offices were located from coast-to-coast to market and service these products.

He received his BS in civil and environmental engineering from UW-Madison in 1935. He was appointed the first CRSI Research Fellow in 1935 at Lehigh University, and conducted research on rebar reinforcements, concrete slabs, and beams for the CRSI. He received his MS in civil engineering from Lehigh in 1937.

During World War II, he served in the U.S. Navy Civil Engineering Corps and the Naval Technical Mission in Europe, retiring with the rank of Lt. Cdr. USNR. He resides in La Grange, Illinois.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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