1988 Award Recipients

EDWIN N. LIGHTFOOT
Chemical Engineering
The 1988 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

DALE F. RUDD
Chemical Engineering
The 1988 Byron Bird Award

ELMER W. BECKER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN E. BERNDT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROBERT W. ECK
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

PAUL A. ELFERS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DAVID L. FORD, JR.
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

C. DANIEL GELATT, JR.
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ELMER R. KAISER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CARL R. MARSCHKE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES R. MYERS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RICHARD H. THOMAS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES S. VAUGHAN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

BERNARD A. WEIDEMAN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

KURT H. WULFF
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

FUMITAKE YOSHIDA
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

EDWIN N. LIGHTFOOT

EDWIN N. LIGHTFOOT (Large image)

EDWIN N. LIGHTFOOT

Chemical engineering Professor Edwin N. Lightfoot is this year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for excellence in teaching of engineering students.

In support of his nomination for the award, his departmental colleagues called him "an extremely enthusiastic instructor who has great concern for the professional development of his students. His courses are highly innovative and are never repeated in scope or detail. His incredible record of productivity carries over into the classroom and his students enjoy the benefits of his efforts to bring new ideas and challenges to his courses."

Several of his graduate students said their advisor "patiently helps us to develop skills both to identify what are important and worthwhile problems, and to solve them with a strong fundamental approach and a realistic, practical outlook. Our critical skills and our imagination are tested and developed by the huge diversity of ideas which Professor Lightfoot enthusiastically shares with us."

In addition to his teaching, Lightfoot's contribution to education has included work on several pioneering textbooks in the field of chemical engineering. The book Transport Phenomena, (Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot; Wiley, 1960) has had an enormous impact on engineering education. Since its publication, the subject of transport phenomena has become a standard course in chemical engineering curricula in the U.S. and abroad. The textbook Transport Phenomena in Living Systems (Lightfoot, Wiley, 1974) is also a pioneering text based largely on Lightfoot's research program.

"I view teaching as the primary responsibility of professors, whether in the classroom, in the direction of research, or in external activities. Present-day funding pressures and opinion polls based on expenditures rather than accomplishments make it very difficult to maintain this priority, but it is essential that we do so. No other group has so privileged a position, or comparable responsibility, for identifying long-range needs and providing the skilled people to meet them. And no one else has the same opportunity for interacting with our brightest young people at their most enthusiastic and energetic stage of development."

Lightfoot's other awards include the Wm. H. Walker Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers for meritorious contribution to the chemical engineering literature in 1975, and the Food, Pharmaceutical, and Bioengineering Division Award of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers in 1979. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1979, and received UW-Madison Hilldale Professorships in 1980 and 1985.

He received his BS in chemical engineering in 1947, and his PhD in chemical engineering in 1951, both from Cornell University. He joined the faculty in 1953.

DALE F. RUDD

DALE F. RUDD (Large image)

DALE F. RUDD

Dale F. Rudd receives the 1988 Byron Bird Award for excellence in a research publication for his series of papers entitled, "The Synthesis of System Designs: I. Elementary Decomposition Theory," "The Synthesis of System Designs: II. Heuristic Structuring," and "The Synthesis of System Designs: III. Toward a Process Concept Generator."

These papers are widely recognized as the works which established the area of process synthesis in the field of computerized process design. Process synthesis is used to model the chemical processes that might be used throughout a plant used to commercially produce chemicals. It uses a computer to determine which set of processes is most appropriate, reducing the need to experiment in a full-scale production plant. The process has been used to invent technology for industries such as food processing, waste treatment, and chemical production. For example, one process synthesis research project analyzed how the petrochemical industry might shift toward renewable feedstocks. Rudd's papers laid the foundation for future work in both research and teaching, and defined topics which are now integrated into the current chemical engineering curriculum on a national scale.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology chemical engineering Professor George Stephanopoulos, wrote in support of Rudd's nomination: "It is not an exaggeration to claim that all subsequent work in the area of process synthesis is an expansion and elaboration on the ideas introduced by (these) papers. Their value has transgressed the confines of the academic research and has influenced in a very profound manner the way that engineering design is being propagated."

Chemical engineering Professor C. Judson King of the University of California, Berkeley, called Rudd's papers "truly pioneering and important papers in the field of computerized process synthesis. They were written at a time when this field was very much in its infancy, and they had major impact both then and thereafter."

Chemical engineering Professor Arthur W. Westerberg of Carnegie Mellon University wrote of Rudd's works, "The first paper in 1968, and the one following it, started a number of people looking into this area. If one were to write a review of this area today, it would include from 300 to 400 references. Interestingly enough the term synthesis, which appears in the title of Rudd's first paper, has become the term used to describe this area."

Rudd received his BS in chemical engineering in 1956, and his PhD in chemical engineering in 1959, both from the University of Minnesota. He joined the faculty in 1961. His other awards include being names a J. S. Guggenheim Fellow in 1971, an Outstanding Educator of America in 1975, and election to the National Academy of Engineering in 1978. He was awarded a UW-Madison Slichter Professorship in 1979.

ELMER W. BECKER

ELMER W. BECKER (Large image)

ELMER W. BECKER

As a senior water engineer for the United States government, Elmer W. Becker designed a complete water works system for the city of Greendale, Wis. in 1936. After combat service during WWII, he became a leader in the design, construction and research of water projects in Milwaukee.

In 1964, he became superintendent of water works for the City of Milwaukee. He effectively managed budgets, provided for water rate adjustments and necessary financing, including bond issues, during a period of rapid inflation while still providing for major increases in system capacity. He retired in 1972.

Becker earned his BS in civil engineering and his Civil Engineer Degree from UW-Madison in 1924 and 1937, respectively. In 1968, he was chosen American Waterworks Association Man of the Year. In 1966, he received the American Water Works Association's John H. Murdoch Advancement Award.

He lives in Milwaukee, Wis.

JOHN E. BERNDT

JOHN E. BERNDT (Large image)

JOHN E. BERNDT

John E. Berndt has spent his entire professional career with AT&T. He began in 1961 as an assistant engineer with Wisconsin Telephone, becoming vice president of business operations in 1978.

In 1979, he was appointed an assistant vice president of AT&T, and became vice president of market planning for AT&T International in 1984. In 1985, he was named president and CEO of AT&TI. He assumed his current position of senior vice president, international services business markets group, in 1987. He has been instrumental in negotiating agreements with Dutch, French and Japanese companies and building international equipment sales to over a billion dollars a year.

He also has been active in civic and international organizations such as United Way, the International Protocol Officers Association and the Business Council for International Understanding.

Born in Hartford, Wis., he received his BS in electrical engineering from UW-Madison in 1963.

ROBERT W. ECK

ROBERT W. ECK (Large image)

ROBERT W. ECK

Robert W. Eck is known as an innovator in production processing technology. Through keen business management, Eck has expanded the foundry and fabricating industries, established company subsidiaries and generated employment throughout Wisconsin.

In 1950, he joined the Eck Foundry, which his father established in 1948. He currently serves as its president and chairman of the board. During his years of service, two subsidiary companies have been acquired. These include Consumer's Inc., a major producer of custom fabrications and in-ground lifts for automotive service stations, and Great Lakes Die Casting, which was relocated to Grafton, Wis. in 1984 and renamed Pressure Cast, Ltd.

Eck received his BS in metallurgical engineering from UW-Madison in 1947. He serves on the board of directors of the United Foundrymen of Wisconsin, and is past president of the Northeast Wisconsin Industrial Association. He has been recognized for 35 years of service to the Aluminum Association, Society of Automotive Engineers, and the American Foundrymen's Society.

He resides in Manitowoc, Wis.

PAUL A. ELFERS

PAUL A. ELFERS (Large image)

PAUL A. ELFERS

Paul A. Elfers was a pioneer in industrial process control and measurement instrumentation. In 1928, he helped establish Fisher Governor Company, Marshalltown, Iowa, as a well-known national and international producer of control valves, regulators and industrial controllers for functions of pressure level and flow conditions in industry. He retired from the company in 1962, remaining as a director for seven more years.

He received his BS degree in chemical engineering from UW-Madison in 1925. Through his generous contribution, the Paul A. Elfers Professorship in Chemical Engineering was recently established at UW-Madison.

During WWII, he was a member of the Scientific Apparatus Manufacturers Association war problems committee, and a "Dollar a Year" consultant to the War Production Board.

In addition, he has been an active member of the Fluid Controls Institute, serving as president from 1949-51.

Born in Milwaukee, Wis., Elfers now lives in Incline Village, Nevada. He is married and has a son and a daughter.

DAVID L. FORD, JR.

DAVID L. FORD, JR. (Large image)

DAVID L. FORD, JR.

David L. Ford, Jr. has wide-ranging experience as a teacher, researcher and consultant in the area of organizational behavior. He has taught at Yale, Michigan State University, and Purdue University, and is currently Professor of Organizational Behavior, School of Management, University of Texas at Dallas.

He has participated in numerous programs involving human relations training, community involvement, leadership/motivation and management development -- both domestically and internationally/ including programs in Singapore, Johannesburg, South Africa, and Guangzhous, People's Republic of China. He has over 45 publications, and has made presentations at over 80 professional meetings.

In addition, he has been active in professional and community service organizations. He is considered a leader in developing solutions to minority problems in Dallas.

He received his BS in industrial engineering from Iowa State University in 1967. He received an MS in industrial engineering in 1969, and PhD in organizational analysis and design in 1972, both from UW-Madison.

He is married with one child, and resides in Dallas, Texas.

C. DANIEL GELATT, JR.

C. DANIEL GELATT, JR. (Large image)

C. DANIEL GELATT, JR.

C. Daniel Gelatt, Jr. joined Northern Micrographics in 1982, becoming its president in 1983. He is also the founder and president of NMT Corporation, La Crosse, WI, a provider of computer graphics services and software.

Gelatt was an assistant professor of physics at Harvard University from 1975 to 1979, with a primary research interest in the calculation of electronic and bonding properties of metallic compounds. From 1979 to 1982, he was a researcher at IBM'S Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and manager of VLSI Design Automation. While at IBM, he and Dr. Scott Kirkpatrick developed the techniques that utilized concepts from statistical mechanics for optimizing integrated circuit layouts. They shared the 1987 American Institute of Physics Industrial Applications of Physics award.

He received his BS in physics and mathematics in June, 1969, and MS in physics in August, 1969, both from UW-Madison. He received his PhD in physics from Harvard University in 1974.

He and his wife live in La Crosse, Wis. with their two daughters.

ELMER R. KAISER

ELMER R. KAISER (Large image)

ELMER R. KAISER

Elmer R. Kaiser has more than 40 years experience in combustion engineering. He has directed research programs in coal and refuse combustion, incineration and emissions control.

His experience includes the development of incinerators for municipal and industrial refuse, and stokers for solid fuels and gasification systems. His research includes the characterization of municipal refuse, heat and mass balance for boilers and incinerators, emissions sampling and analysis, and investigations of wet scrubbers.

He has held engineering research positions at Battelle Memorial Institute, Bituminous Coal Research, Inc. and New York University. In addition, he has authored 70 technical papers and rendered distinguished service for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

He received both his BS and MS in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in 1934, both cum laude. He has continued his involvement and support of the university, establishing the Elmer and Janet Ambach Kaiser Chair in Mechanical Engineering in 1987, and contributing generously to student loan programs.

Kaiser was born in New Holstein, Wis. on August 29,1909, to parents who were born and raised on Wisconsin farms. He learned the German language at an early age from his grandparents, who came from Germany in 1854 and did not learn to speak much English. He speaks both high and low German.

He currently resides in Winter Haven, Florida, with his wife, Janet.

CARL R. MARSCHKE

CARL R. MARSCHKE (Large image)

CARL R. MARSCHKE

Carl R. Marschke formed Marquip, Inc. in June, 1968. As president and CEO, he guides and directs the company and contributes to new product development. Marschke and partner Richard Thomas have built Marquip into a technical leader and the largest U.S. supplier of equipment for the corrugated box industry.

Marquip currently has two facilities: the main plant and company headquarters in Phillips, Wis. and a component manufacturing plant in Madison. There are also a number of engineering and sales representatives serving local markets in the U.S. and Europe.

Marschke received a BS and MS in electrical engineering from UW-Madison in 1963 and 1964, respectively. Among his awards are the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry Corrugated Containers Division Award in 1987, honoring his exceptional contributions to the technological advance of the corrugated containers industry, and the Distinguished Service Award by the College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison. In addition, Marquip has received the Presidential "E" Award in 1981, the Governor's Export Award in 1987, and the Governor's New Product Award in 1983 and 1985. Marschke holds 20 U.S. and foreign patents, and is a registered Professional Engineer in Wisconsin.

Organizations in which Marschke has taken an active part include the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and the Young President's Organization.

Born in Marshfield, Wis., in 1941, he resides in Phillips, Wis. with his wife Gay. His children (Karl, Dean and Lyn) are currently attending college.

JAMES R. MYERS

JAMES R. MYERS (Large image)

JAMES R. MYERS

James R. Myers pioneered the application of ceramic anodes for cathodic protection systems. His early advocacy and designs have made ceramic cathodes a new standard for longevity and low cost in CP systems.

He has also conducted investigations focusing on copper tube-water systems. He is considered the foremost authority in this technical area and often presents the Copper Development Association.

In addition, his expertise as a corrosion engineer enabled him to solve serious corrosion problems at U.S. Air Force installations, preventing future storage leakage. From 1962 to 1979, he also served as a professor of metallurgical engineering at the Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

Currently, he is director and technical consultant at JRM Associates, Franklin, Ohio. He also teaches specialized continuing education courses for the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, the University of Wisconsin, and the U.S. Army.

He received a BS degree in metallurgical engineering from the University Cincinnati in 1956, and an MS in metallurgical engineering from UW-Madison in 1957. He received his PhD in metallurgical engineering from the Ohio State University in 1964.

RICHARD H. THOMAS

RICHARD H. THOMAS (Large image)

RICHARD H. THOMAS

Richard H. Thomas joined Marquip, Inc. in October 1969. As vice-president and secretary, he has management responsibilities for engineering, field service, data processing, accounting and product development. He currently holds six U.S. patents and over 17 foreign patents.

Thomas and Carl Marschke, company founder, collaborate on technical development of products and business planning. Together they have made the company a technical leader and a major supplier of automation equipment for the corrugated box industry. Marquip received the Wisconsin Governor's New Product Award in 1983 and 1985, the Governor's Export Award in 1987, and the President's "E" Award in 1981.

He received a BS, MS and PhD from the UW-Madison department of electrical engineering in 1963, 1964, and 1969 respectively. He is a member of IEEE, the Technical Association of Pulp and Paper Industry, Tau Beta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma XI, and is a senior member of the Instrument Society of America. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Wisconsin.

Born in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, he resides in Phillips, Wisconsin with his wife, Sharon.

JAMES S. VAUGHAN

JAMES S. VAUGHAN (Large image)

JAMES S. VAUGHAN

In 1946, James S. Vaughan joined the Square D Company, a multinational manufacturer of electrical control, electronics and distribution equipment. His outstanding management skills won him election as Square D's vice president in 1955. He became a director as well as vice president of manufacturing planning in 1976. He led efforts to improve manufacturing efficiency of both domestic and foreign operations, and analyzed the manufacturing operations of potential acquisitions. In 1981, Square D had sales of $1.1 billion, a net income of $102 million, 41 plants in the U.S. and 20 plants abroad.

After retiring from Square D in 1982, he became a vice president at Lubar and Co., Inc., an investment banking firm. Since 1985, he has been vice president for business plans at the Milwaukee Innovation Center, an organization which helps entrepreneurs finance expansion of their companies.

During WWII, he was stationed at the Pentagon, where he was responsible for budgeting and control of all military and civilian positions under the supervision of the Chief Signal Officer. He concluded his service as a Lt. Colonel.

He earned a BS in civil engineering from UW-Madison in 1938. He also studied under a graduate scholarship in public administration at Syracuse University from 1939-40.

He became a director of the University of Wisconsin Foundation in 1972. From 1976 to 1987 he was chairman of the Bascom Hill Society. In 1987, he became Chairman of the Board of the UW Foundation.

For many years he served as a church organist and still retains membership in the American Guild of Organists and the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America. Born in Madison, he currently resides in Mequon, Wis.

BERNARD A. WEIDEMAN

BERNARD A. WEIDEMAN (Large image)

BERNARD A. WEIDEMAN

As a Reserve Officer in the U.S. Army Ordinance Dept., Bernard Weideman was called into active service at the Chicago Ordinance Procurement Office 10 months before WWII began. His duties as head of the Small Arms Procurement Division were to negotiate contracts with manufacturers and follow through with production requirements.

After 31 months of service with this office the opportunity of release became possible, and he returned to Globe Union, Inc., in Wisconsin. He worked projects that were then secret: The engineering, testing and production of mechanical arming devices for proximity fuses used on bombs, rockets, and mortar shells. This work resulted in awards from Naval Ordinance, and the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development. He retired from Globe Union in 1961 after 30 years of service.

He received his BS in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in 1925. Since retiring, he and his wife have developed their hobby of bird watching, making many world-wide trips and seeing more than 2000 bird species. They reside in Tucson, Arizona.

KURT H. WULFF

KURT H. WULFF (Large image)

KURT H. WULFF

Kurt H. Wulff analyzed domestic oil producers for the New York brokerage firm of Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenerette from 1971 to 1987. In 1988, he started his own firm, McDep Associates Inc.

He is recognized as one of the nation's top business and financial analysts in the domestic oil and oil exploration fields. In 1985, he was named by Institutional Investor as the analyst of the year for his contributions in restructuring the domestic oil production and exploration conglomerates. In 1988, he authored a book on oil investments explaining the McDep Ratio, a tool for financial analysis that he created.

He received his BS in chemical engineering from UW-Madison in 1962, and his MBA from Harvard University in 1967. From 1962 to 1966, he designed oil refineries and petrochemical plants for Chevron. From 1967 to 1971, he served as a consultant for A.D. Little Inc.

Over the years, he has been a major financial contributor to the department of chemical engineering, especially for undergraduate scholarships.

Wulff, a Wisconsin native, resides in Short Hills, New Jersey with his wife Louise.

FUMITAKE YOSHIDA

FUMITAKE YOSHIDA (Large image)

FUMITAKE YOSHIDA

Fumitake Yoshida is one of the world's most respected chemical engineers. He has taken a major role in initiating international cooperative programs with Japanese universities and industries, including the UW-Madison Department of Chemical Engineering.

He has conducted research on various mass transfer operations, gas-liquid systems in particular, investigating their applications in bioengineering and medical technology. He also did research at the college with Professor Olaf Hougen in 1959.

Yoshida received his BS and PhD degrees in engineering from Kyoto University in 1937 and 1951, respectively. Currently, he is professor emeritus of chemical engineering at Kyoto University and editor of Chemical Engineering Science, an international journal. He continues to be a visiting lecturer at universities around the world, most recently in Germany.

He participated in fund raising activities in the orient for the Hougen Professorship at UW-Madison, and has been a frequent visitor to the Department of Chemical Engineering. Among his many awards and citations was election to the National Academy of Engineering of the United States in 1979.

He resides in Kyoto, Japan.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
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