1987 Award Recipients

ALOIS L. SCHLACK, JR.
Professor, Engineering Mechanics
The 1987 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

W. HARMON RAY
Professor, Chemical Engineering
The 1987 Byron Bird Award

GLEN W. BAILEY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

EUGENE F. BESPALOW
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

STEVEN J. BOMBA
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

EDWARD HENRY BRYAN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ALLAN H. CLAUER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

PATRICK FRANCIS FLYNN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ORA B. MORGAN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ARUN G. PHADKE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

R. DAVID PITTLE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

MILTON J. SHOEMAKER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ALOIS L. SCHLACK, JR.

ALOIS L. SCHLACK, JR. (Large image)

ALOIS L. SCHLACK, JR.

Engineering mechanics Professor Alois L. Schlack, Jr. is this year's recipient of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for Excellence in teaching of engineering students.

In a letter supporting his nomination, his colleagues in the department wrote, "Teaching is not just a job for him. He enjoys it, radiates enthusiasm, and motivates student for their professional lives."

A group of engineering mechanics graduate students wrote, "Professor Schlack's reputation among the graduate students is not just a result of his classroom expertise. His respect as an educator also stems from the respect he gives the students. He shows genuine concern for what they think and values their input. He always has time for students because he wants to see them do well, both in and out of the classroom."

"His friendly personality, his unique sense of humor and most of all his enthusiasm for the material motivates his students. You do not watch the clock when Professor Schlack is teaching...he keeps you constantly interested. Students are willing to give 100 percent because he gives 100 percent," wrote a group of undergraduates in Schlack's department.

Schlack also receives praise for his innovative teaching tools, including his computer-aided tutorial system for statics which allow students to get help with their homework seven days a week, 24 hours a day.

Enrollments in his courses, such as aerodynamics and celestial mechanics, are always the largest in the department. Some students plan their class schedules to take as many classes as possible with him.

Schlack says, "The college encourages and provides an excellent atmosphere for those of us who enjoy teaching. I can honestly say teaching and the satisfaction I get from it are the reasons I chose to stay at the college."

In addition to this award, Schlack received the Polygon Outstanding Instructor award in his department (by student vote) 15 times, the 1983-84 Tau Beta Pi Outstanding Teacher Award (one awarded college-wide per year by student vote), and was one of seven professors campus-wide to receive the UW-Madison Distinguished Teaching Award in 1982.

Schlack earned his BS in applied mathematics and engineering mechanics in 1956 and his PhD in engineering mechanics in 1961, both from the UW-Madison. He joined the faculty in 1960.

W. HARMON RAY

W. HARMON RAY (Large image)

W. HARMON RAY

W. Harmon Ray receives the 1987 Byron Bird Award for an outstanding research publication for his papers, "On the Dynamic Behavior of Continuous Stirred Tank Reactors" and "The Classification of Continuous Stirred Tank Reactors—Influence of Reactor Resident Time."

These papers are widely recognized as landmark contributions in the chemical reaction system area. He was the first to apply mathematical bifurcation theory and continuation methods to show how the structure and dynamic stability of chemical reaction systems depend on operating and design parameters. The exotic structures and dynamic behavior discovered in this work stimulated further research on other more complex chemical systems. This work has had important practical implications for the chemical industry and in many other fields involving chemical reactions including cancer research, combustion processes, and chemical and materials production.

University of Rochester chemical engineering Professor Martin Feinberg wrote in support of Ray's award nomination: "Harmon's papers on the dynamics of continuous stirred tank reactors...are among the most influential of those written by any chemical engineer at any institution at any time. I would guess that they are among the most cited papers in the chemical engineering literature in any area."

Professor Manfred Morari, California Institute of Technology, wrote, "I would estimate that at least one of Harmon's two papers is referenced in about 75 percent of all stirred reactor papers written since (1974)."

Roger A. Schmitz, vice president and associate provost of the University of Notre Dame, said he considers Ray's papers "as among the most significant publications on reaction system dynamics that have appeared in my 25 years of following this field...I have told all new graduate students who have joined my research group that their first task is to master this series of papers. After that I can discuss with them meaningfully current directions and objectives."

Ray earned his BA in 1962 from Rice University and a BS in chemical engineering from Rice in 1963. He earned his PhD in chemical engineering in 1966 from the University of Minnesota. He joined the UW-Madison chemical engineering faculty in 1976 after working as a chemical engineering professor at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; and at State University of New York at Buffalo. He was named Steenbock Professor of Engineering in 1986.

GLEN W. BAILEY

GLEN W. BAILEY (Large image)

GLEN W. BAILEY

Glenn W. Bailey earned his BS in mechanical engineering from UW-Madison in 1946 and an MBA from Harvard in 1951.

Bailey worked for Ford Motor, Chrysler, and Curtiss Wright before joining ITT in 1960, where he progressed through the presidencies of a subsidiary, a division, and finally an international group with revenues in excess of $140 million a year.

In 1967 he bought control of Keene Packaging Associates, the first in a series of acquisitions organized into the Keene Corporation, which became a subsidiary of Bairnco. Bailey is president and chairman of Bairnco and serves on the board of Kaydon Corporation, a former Bairnco subsidiary.

Bailey is a trustee of the Darden Business School of the University of Virginia.

He and his wife, Cornelia, live in Darien, Conn., and Key Largo, Fla.

EUGENE F. BESPALOW

EUGENE F. BESPALOW (Large image)

EUGENE F. BESPALOW

Eugene F. Bespalow, retired vice president and chief engineer of Choctaw Inc., Memphis, Tenn., designed, built, and tested the first prestressed, precast concrete bridge for experimental purposes in 1936. He also produced the first machine-made perforated concrete pipe and, working with the Arkansas Highway Department, developed precast, prestressed concrete bridge units which provided finished deck sections.

He was made an honorary member of the American Society for Testing and Materials in 1976 for his leadership role in the concrete pipe industry. He was president of the American Concrete Pipe Association in 1958 and 1959 and elected an honorary member in 1979.

He has authored numerous papers on concrete pipe design, design of semi-dry concrete mixes, and design and production of precast and prestressed concrete bridge units. He holds patents on perforated concrete pipe.

A Milwaukee native and a 1921 graduate of the UW-Madison civil engineering department, Bespalow joined Choctow in 1928 as manager of the concrete pipe department after working for the Wisconsin Highway Department and the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads.

Since he retired in 1970, he has worked as an International Executive Service Corps volunteer on projects in South America and as a consultant.

STEVEN J. BOMBA

STEVEN J. BOMBA (Large image)

STEVEN J. BOMBA

Steven J. Bomba, who earned his BS, MS, and PhD degrees in physics from the UW-Madison in 1959, 1961, and 1967 respectively, is vice-president of advanced manufacturing technologies for Rockwell International.

In 1968 he joined Mobil, where he worked on the development of CYBER-LOGIC, a real time minicomputer-based control system. He went to Texas Instruments as a systems engineer in 1972. In 1975 he joined Collins Radio Company of Rockwell International where he was part of the team that designed, built, sold, and installed the communications satellite systems for distributing Public Broadcast System Television. He went to work for Allen-Bradley, now a Rockwell subsidiary, in 1978 as manager of new product development.

Bomba has been an active supporter of the college and is currently chairman of its Industrial Liaison Council.

He and his wife, Janet, live in Whitefish Bay, Wisc. They have two daughters.

EDWARD HENRY BRYAN

EDWARD HENRY BRYAN (Large image)

EDWARD HENRY BRYAN

Edward Henry Bryan joined the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 1972 after working in industry and as a civil engineering professor at Duke University. He is now program director for environmental engineering at NSF.

While at Duke, he conducted research on the impact of non-point pollution sources on quality of surface waters. While with Rexnord, Inc., from 1970 to 1972, he developed a response system for hazardous substance spills which is now used by government and industry.

NSF has given him achievement awards for his efforts in flood mitigation and for helping develop a community water management research program. He has directed several scientific workshops on water quality and has served on a national committee to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation in water supply systems, and on the Water Pollution Control Federation's committee for water reuse. He is an American Academy of Environmental Engineers Diplomate.

Born in Milwaukee, he earned his BS, MS, and PhD degrees from the college in civil engineering in 1949, 1950, and 1954 respectively.

He played violin with the University of Wisconsin, Dow Chemical, and Duke University symphony orchestras.

He is married with three children and lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland.

ALLAN H. CLAUER

ALLAN H. CLAUER (Large image)

ALLAN H. CLAUER

Allan H. Clauer joined Battelle Memorial Institute in 1960 as a researcher and is now technical leader, advanced materials development. He is responsible for the advanced materials program and is involved in long-range materials research with emphasis on metals and alloys.

He received his BS and MS degrees from the UW-Madison in metallurgical engineering in 1958 and 1961 and his PhD in metallurgy in 1968 from Ohio State.

Clauer is known for his work on dispersion strengthened metals and oxides, and for his early use of lasers for surface treatment of metals. He has helped improve industrial productivity through his work with direct casting of thin metal sheet and with powder metal processing of rapidly solidified powders.

He served in the U.S. Army on active duty and in the reserves.

He was born in Oak Wood, Wisc, and now lives in Worthington, Ohio.

PATRICK FRANCIS FLYNN

PATRICK FRANCIS FLYNN (Large image)

PATRICK FRANCIS FLYNN

Patrick Francis Flynn joined Cummins Engine Company, Columbus, Ohio, in 1970 and was named vice president, research and technology, in 1985. He is responsible for planning of research and engineering efforts for empirical and analytical technical tools.

Flynn earned his BS and MS degrees in 1959 and 1965 in agricultural engineering from the University of Minnesota and worked as a design engineer for International Harvester and John Deere before joining Cummins. He has an MBA from Indiana University and a PhD (1971) in mechanical engineering from the UW-Madison.

Flynn has taught here and spent a year studying and teaching at the University of Cambridge, England, as an Industrial Fellow Commoner.

He and his wife, Beverly, have a son and a daughter.

ORA B. MORGAN

ORA B. MORGAN (Large image)

ORA B. MORGAN

Ora B. Morgan is director, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He joined ORNL in 1958 where he has done pioneering work in the development of neutral beam heating systems and their application in tokamaks.

Morgan earned his BS and MS degrees in engineering physics in 1956 and 1957 from North Carolina State University. His work at ORNL included research on magnetic mirrors with emphasis on plasma filling and trapping. In 1968, ORNL awarded him a full fellowship to the UW-Madison, where he earned his PhD in 1970 in nuclear engineering.

Morgan has been awarded two patents.

He was born in Kershaw, S.C. He is married and has two children.

ARUN G. PHADKE

ARUN G. PHADKE (Large image)

ARUN G. PHADKE

Arun G. Phadke, American Electric Power Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is an expert in fast computational techniques for determining the state of an electric power system.

He earned a BS in 1955 from Agra University in India; a Bachelor's of Technology degree in 1959 from the Indian Institute of Technology, Khargpur, India; and an MS in electrical engineering in 1961 from Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

He earned his PhD from the UW-Madison in electrical engineering in 1964, was later an assistant professor in the department, and still frequently lectures on electric power transmission at the college's professional development training seminars.

He received the 1986 Edison Electric Institute's Power Engineering Educator Award and an award from CIGRE (International Conference on Large High Voltage Electric Systems, Paris, France) for his paper on fast collection and processing of information for adaptive decision-making to prevent cascading power failures.

He has been awarded two U.S. patents and one each in Sweden and the United Kingdom.

R. DAVID PITTLE

R. DAVID PITTLE (Large image)

R. DAVID PITTLE

R. David Pittle is technical director of Consumers Union, Mt. Vernon, N.Y., where he oversees 75 technical staff members responsible for all testing conducted at this non-profit organization that publishes Consumers Report magazine.

He earned his BS in electrical engineering in 1963 from the University of Maryland and his MS and PhD degrees from the UW-Madison in electrical engineering in 1965 and 1969 respectively. Upon leaving Wisconsin, he joined the faculty at Carnegie-MeIlon University where he developed the first federally funded program on product safety at a university in the nation. He also served as President of the Alliance for Consumer Protection in Pittsburgh.

In recognition of his achievements, he was appointed by President Nixon as one of the first commissioners to the Consumer Product Safety Commission in 1973. He served in this capacity under four presidents until 1982, when he joined the Consumers Union staff.

He was born in Washington, D.C., and now lives in Westchester County, N.Y. with his wife, Allyne, and two daughters.

MILTON J. SHOEMAKER

MILTON J. SHOEMAKER (Large image)

MILTON J. SHOEMAKER

Milton J. Shoemaker was a founder of Research Products Corporation, Madison, a company that produces air and water filtration systems. He held positions there, which included responsibility for chemical research and patent applications, from 1938 until his retirement in 1964.

Among his many contributions to the company was the development of a process to thicken mineral oil, making it an effective dust-catcher on air filters. The process was licensed to Squibb when Research Products found it could be used in making ointments. According to Ragnar Onstad, former Research Products chairman, the process earned "several hundreds of thousands of dollars" for Research Products.

Before joining Research Products, Shoemaker worked as a chemical engineer for Du Pont, Sherwin Williams, and the American Viscose Co. In 1928 he joined the C.F. Burgess Laboratories in Madison, where he developed cellulose compounds.

Shoemaker, originally from Philadelphia, is a 1921 graduate of the chemical engineering department. He and his wife, Anna Maude Shoemaker, recently endowed a professorship in the chemical engineering department.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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