1986 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

ALLAN K. SCIDMORE
Professor, Electrical and Comuter Engineering
The Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

ROGER BOOM
Professor, Nuclear Engineering and Metallurgical and Mineral Engineering
The 1986 Byron Bird Award

HERBERT K. ANSPACH
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JACK F. HAVARD
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JACK ST. CLAIRE KILBY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RONALD J. LOFY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GORDON G. ROBECK
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

BREWSTER H. SHAW, JR.
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

EVERETT C. SHUMAN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HARRY L. SPIEGELBERG
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ALLAN K. SCIDMORE

ALLAN K. SCIDMORE (Large image )

ALLAN K. SCIDMORE

Allan K. Scidmore is given the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for outstanding teaching of engineering students in recognition of his continual efforts to provide students with a quality classroom education and for his innovative teaching materials, both written and video, in rapidly developing areas of electronics.

Since he joined the department in 1955 as an instructor, Scidmore has consistently ranked as one of its best teachers. Student say his lectures are technically challenging, presented in an orderly manner, and stress the practical as well as the theoretical.

A former student wrote, "One of the things that really impressed me about Professor Scidmore is his attitude toward students. He actually cares whether they learn the material. Questions are encouraged during lectures, and students are welcome in his office, even for questions not related strictly to the coursework. I only wish we had more instructors like him."

Scidmore was among 11 UW-Madison faculty to receive the university's Distinguished teaching Award this past spring. The award recognized his videotaped courses in particular. He began experimenting with this medium during the college's enrollment crunch to reach more students, and now uses them extensively for off-campus and summer courses.

"It's a great tool," he says. "Students get to see the material from a different perspective. There's a lot you can do with this medium that's impossible with a regular lecture. Videotapes can be reviewed, repeated or, unlike the professor, fast forwarded."

He added that the medium works best when there's a tutor present to answer questions and encourage discussion. He says students in sections that view the tapes with a tutor do as well as or better than those in traditional classrooms.

Scidmore is a four-time winner of the Polygon Board award for outstanding electrical and computer engineering instruction, and is a recent recipient of an AT&T Foundation Award for his contributions to engineering education. He served as advisor to the college's IEEE student branch and was named 1985 Outstanding Counselor, a national award.

He earned his BS and MS degrees in chemical engineering. He received his PhD in electrical engineering from the UW in 1958.

ROGER BOOM

ROGER BOOM (Large image)

ROGER BOOM

Roger Boom receives the 1986 Byron Bird Award for an outstanding research publication for his series of papers and seven patents on superconducting magnetic energy storage, or SMES, systems.

In 1970, Boom and Professor Harold A. Peterson invented SMES, which uses a large electromagnet supercooled with liquid helium to make it capable of holding large amounts of energy. Since then, Boom has been working on its design and component research and development for various applications including electric utilities, accelerators, fusion reactors, and space energy storage.

Boom describes the overall concept of SMES in his publications, "Superconductive Energy Storage for Power Systems" and "Superconductive Energy Storage," and in more detail in a series of reports, "Wisconsin Superconductive Energy Storage Project."

A colleague at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wrote, "Professor Boom's papers present the case for superconducting magnetic energy storage in a compelling way. He considers the difficult problems associated with the immense task of designing and building an SMES system. The solutions he has devised are plausible and are described in a clear and understandable manner."

Boom's research has received several million dollars from the Wisconsin Electrical Utilities, the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Electric Power Research Institute.

His research has stimulated superconductive magnetic energy storage studies throughout the world. A colleague in Japan, for example, wrote, "Professor Boom's papers opened the field of SMES research for electric utility applications in Japan."

Boom earned an AB, an MS, and a PhD in physics in 1944, 1950, and 1958 respectively. Before joining the faculty here in 1968, he was a visiting scientist at the University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; a research physicist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and supervisor, applied superconductivity, Atomics International, Los Angeles.

The UW-Madison Applied Superconductivity Center, which he is director of, has graduated about 50 PhD and post-doctoral scientists and engineers.

HERBERT K. ANSPACH

HERBERT K. ANSPACH (Large image)

HERBERT K. ANSPACH

Herbert K. Anspach earned his BS in mechanical engineering in 1947 from the UW-Madison and joined Goodyear Tire and Rubber, St. Marys, Ohio, as a development and industrial engineer. In 1953 he received his JD from the University of Michigan Law School and began work at Kaiser Industries, Shadyside, Ohio, where he directed labor relations in a metal stamping plant.

He began his career at Whirlpool, Benton Harbor, Michigan, in the company's patent department in 1955. He was appointed assistant general counsel in 1959 and assistant secretary in 1961. He served as vice president-personnel 1967 through 1975. He served as chairman of the board and CEO of the company's Canadian affiliate, Inglis Ltd. in Toronto prior to his election to the board of directors and as president and chief operating officer of Whirlpool in 1977.

Anspach retired from Whirlpool in 1983 and now manages a private investment consulting business and serves as an advisor to the CEO of the Japanese-owned Matsushita Electric Corp. of America.

Born in Ada, Ohio, in 1926, he lives in Boca Raton, Florida, with his wife, Elizabeth. They have one daughter, Heather.

JACK F. HAVARD

JACK F. HAVARD (Large image)

JACK F. HAVARD

Jack F. Havard attended the Montana School of Mines and the UW-Madison, where he received a PhB in 1934, a PhM in 1935, both in geology; a BS in 1935 in mining engineering and the professional degree EM in 1943 (Engineer of Mines). He completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard in 1957.

Throughout his career, Havard has been involved in the mining industry. Prior to his retirement in 1979, he was senior vice president of Kaiser Engineers, Oakland, California, where he directed services to the international mining industry. He now consults.

Havard served as 1976 president of the Society of Mining Engineers. In 1984 he was elected an honorary member of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers. Previously he had served as a Henry Krumb Lecturer for AIME and received the Hardinge Award for his work in industrial minerals. He is a former member of the United States National Committee on Geology and former director of the Geosat Committee.

Havard and his wife, Faith, live near Nevada City, California, and have four children.

JACK ST. CLAIRE KILBY

JACK ST. CLAIRE KILBY (Large image)

JACK ST. CLAIRE KILBY

Jack St. Claire Kilby received his BS in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in 1947, and his MS in electrical engineering from the UW-Madison in 1950. He is now an independent consultant and inventor working with integrated circuit technology.

Kilby joined the Centralab Division of Globe-Union Inc., Milwaukee, in 1947 as an engineer where he worked on ceramic-based printed circuits. In 1958, he joined Texas Instruments and wrote in his laboratory notebook, "The following circuit elements could be made on a single slice (of silicon): resistors, capacitor, distributed capacitor, transistor." This insight led to the development of the integrated circuit now used in most electronic devices. He held a number of positions in semiconductor R/D management at Texas Instruments including assistant vice president and director of engineering until his retirement in 1970.

Kilby holds more than 50 patents including the first on monolithic integrated circuits, reduced titanate capacitors, semiconductor thermal printers, and handheld calculators.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a recipient of the National Medal of Science, an inductee of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and was awarded an honorary doctorate in engineering from the University of Miami. He is an IEEE fellow and received the organization's Medal of Honor this year.

He was born in Jefferson City, Missouri, in 1923.

RONALD J. LOFY

RONALD J. LOFY (Large image)

RONALD J. LOFY

Ronald J. Lofy joined Lockman and Associates, consulting engineers and planners, Monterey Park, California, in 1978, and is now a partner and director of the Environmental Division.

He earned a BS in civil engineering and an MS and a PhD in sanitary engineering in 1966, 1967, and 1971 respectively from the UW-Madison.

He has authored many publications on wastewater treatment, biomass energy conversion, and hazardous waste management. He has designed and conducted pilot plant experiments dealing with industrial waste cotreatment and is responsible for preparation of research studies dealing with in-sewer treatment, municipal and industrial residue disposal, and landfill gas generation and control.

He directed the design and demonstration of innovative first-of-a-kind systems to extract methane from landfills for energy use and for the control of migrating gas. In 1985, as a consultant with the Los Angeles Fire Department, he directed the construction crews involved in extinguishing a natural methane gas fire which raged for three days.

He has been a key speaker at many engineering professional development continuing education programs on the Madison campus.

He was born in Milwaukee in 1939. He and his wife, Christa, have three children and live in Pasadena, California.

GORDON G. ROBECK

GORDON G. ROBECK (Large image)

GORDON G. ROBECK

Gordon G. Robeck earned a BS in civil engineering from the UW-Madison in 1944 and an MS in sanitary engineering in 1950 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

From 1944 until his retirement in 1985, Robeck was in federal service, most recently as director of the EPA's Drinking Water Research Division, Cincinnati, Ohio.

While with the EPA, he was responsible for a research staff charged with the development of scientific and technical bases for revised national drinking water standards. These efforts helped pass the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act.

While with the EPA, he was responsible for a research staff charged with the development of scientific and technical bases for revised national drinking water standards. These efforts helped pass the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act.

Robeck has published more than 60 papers and reports on treating drinking water and on national drinking water standards.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the International Water Supply Association, the American and International Water Works Associations, the Water Pollution Control Federation, and an Honorary Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He recently was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree from the University of Cincinnati and received the EPA's distinguished career award.

Robeck, father of three sons, was born in 1923 in Denver, and lives in Laguna Hills, California, with his wife, Ephrosinia.

BREWSTER H. SHAW, JR.

BREWSTER H. SHAW, JR. (Large image)

BREWSTER H. SHAW, JR.

Brewster H. Shaw, Jr. is a lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force. He was selected as a NASA astronaut in 1978 after a distinguished career as a combat pilot in Vietnam and instructor at the USAF Test Pilot School.

On his first space shuttle flight in November 1983, Shaw piloted the first spacelab mission. The six-man crew was the largest yet to fly aboard a single spacecraft, the first international shuttle crew, and the first to carry payload specialists. The crew conducted more than 70 scientific and technical investigations during the flight. Columbia's record 10-day flight carried the international scientific module Spacelab.

Shaw's next mission was commander of an Atlantis flight, launched November 1985. He is scheduled to command a Department of Defense mission which will fly soon after the resumption of Shuttle flights.

Shaw, born in Cass City, Michigan, in 1945, received his BS and MS degrees in engineering mechanics in 1968 and 1969 respectively from the UW-Madison.

He joined the USAF in 1969. He has logged more than 5,000 hours of flying time in more than 35 types of aircraft—including 644 hours of combat in F-100 and F-4 aircraft.

Shaw and his wife, Kathy, and their three children, Brewster, Jessica, and Brandon, live in Friendswood, Texas.

EVERETT C. SHUMAN

EVERETT C. SHUMAN (Large image)

EVERETT C. SHUMAN

Everett C. Shuman received a BS with honors in 1924 and an MS in 1925, both in civil engineering from the UW-Madison.

In his early years, Shuman conducted research in concrete at the Portland Cement Association, Chicago, and at the Central Concrete Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineers at West Point and Mt. Vernon, NY, where he received a Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1941.

Shuman is called the "father" of the R-value for thermal resistance of materials and construction. He joined the Institute for Building Research at Pennsylvania State University in 1961. He retired in 1968, and now consults on moisture problems in constructions.

He is active in the American Society for Testing and Materials, where he is an honorary member of two technical committees. He received the society's Award of Merit in 1964. He served as the first non-staff chairman of the organization's Committee on Publications, and on the committee that published its first metric practice guide. He is on the Committee on Terminology, and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Testing and Evaluation.

He also is on the board of the Building Thermal Envelope Coordinating Council, and on the Committee on Terminology of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers.

HARRY L. SPIEGELBERG

HARRY L. SPIEGELBERG (Large image)

HARRY L. SPIEGELBERG

Harry L. Spiegelberg earned a BS in chemical engineering in 1959 from the UW- Madison and then joined Kimberly-Clark, where he held various technical and managerial positions prior to his appointment as vice president for consumer tissue research in 1984.

In 1961, he took a leave from the company to attend the Institute of Paper Chemistry, Appleton, where he earned an MS in 1963 and a PhD in 1965. He also received an MBA from the University of Chicago in 1980.

During the 1960s, Spiegelberg served as company commander of the 291st Combat Engineer Battalion, U.S. Army Reserves.

He chaired the 1971 Gordon Research Conference on Chemistry and Physics of Paper, has served as the Institute of Paper Chemistry Alumni Association Chairman, and chaired a national fundraising drive for the UW.

He is the business manager for the Children's Theater Inc., Appleton. He also is active in the First Congregational Church, Appleton. He is listed in Who's Who in the Midwest.

Spiegelberg was born in New London in 1936. He and his wife, Bonnie, have two daughters and two sons.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
Accessibility

Web services
Copyright 2010 The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System