1985 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

R. BYRON BIRD
Professor, Chemical Engineering
The 1985 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

JOHN J. UICKER,JR.
Professor, Mechanical Engineering
The 1985 Byron Bird Award

JOHN B. LAMBERT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

TERRY O. NORRIS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

OSCAR C. BOLDT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN W. ROGERS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

NATHANIEL K. ZELAZO
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN K. DRAEGER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

INYONG HAM
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN W. LILLESAND
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JACK C. BOKROS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CARL W. GIESLER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

R. BYRON BIRD

R. BYRON BIRD (Large image)

R. BYRON BIRD

This year's Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for outstanding teaching of engineering students goes to R. Byron Bird, who one former student says "ranks as the top educator in chemical engineering in the United States over the past 30 years."

Bird earned his BS in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois in 1947 and his PhD from the UW in physical chemistry in 1950. He joined the faculty in 1955, became a full professor in 1957, and served as department chairman from 1964 to 1968.

Bird is widely admired for his skill in the classroom, as well as for his textbooks and dictionaries. A former student wrote, "He has a marvelous ability to present even complex material in a concise and transparent form, to make it accessible to large audiences." He is co-author of four books on various aspects of molecular theory and transport phenomena. Probably the best known of these is Transport Phenomena, a junior-level engineering text written with engineering colleagues Professors W.E. Stewart and E.N. Lightfoot. It has been translated into four languages and is in its 35th printing.

"I've always wanted to be a teacher, and I don't seem to care what the subject is as long as I'm involved in teaching," Bird says. "Bookwriting is teaching on a worldwide scale. With books you can reach your own students as well as students across the nation and around the world."

Bird was a Fulbright Fellow and later a Lecturer and Guggenheim Fellow in the Netherlands and a Fulbright Lecturer in Japan. He has taught elementary Dutch informally, has co-authored two college Dutch readers, and was co-founder of the Dutch Club of Madison. He recently was elected to the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

He and Professor E.E. Daub of the Department of General Engineering joined with Professor Inoue of Tokyo to write Comprehending Technical Japanese, a reader designed to help students in engineering and the sciences acquire the techniques necessary for translating technical material.

He has developed several new courses including ones in transport phenomena, physiochemical hydrodynamics, macromolecular hydrodynamics, and structural theories of fluid dynamics.

Bird received honorary doctorates from Lehigh University, Washington University, Technische Hogeschool (Delft, Holland), and Clarkson College of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was one of the founders of the Rheology Research Center. He also is an avid hiker and canoeist.

JOHN J. UICKER, JR.

JOHN J. UICKER, JR. (Large image)

JOHN J. UICKER, JR.

Mechanical engineering Professor John J. Uicker, Jr. is the sixth recipient of the Byron Bird Award for an outstanding research publication.

He is given the Bird award for his papers on the dynamic analysis of planar and spatial mechanisms. His publications have pioneered in the computer-aided design analysis of mechanical systems, and have been of prime importance to industry, particularly in the field of robotics. He was the first to use the matrix method of linkage analysis to study forces and torques arising from inertia of moving links and the first to write the dynamic equations of motion for the general rigid body mechanical systems. His two-part paper, "Dynamic Force Analysis of Spatial Linkages" and "Dynamic Behavior of Spatial Linkages," led him to develop the first generalized computer program, Integrated Mechanisms Program, for dynamic and kinematic analyses of mechanical linkages.

Uicker earned his BS in mechanical engineering at the University of Detroit and his MS and PhD in mechanical engineering at Northwestern University. He served in the U.S. Army as a captain. He joined the College of Engineering faculty in 1967. He is also director of the UW-Madison's Computer-Aided Engineering Center. He has worked as a research engineer and principal research engineering associate for the Ford Motor Company. He spent a year as a visiting professor under a Fulbright senior lecturer award at Cranfield Institute of Technology in England.

He is coauthor of a leading undergraduate textbook on kinematics and machine system dynamics. He also served as editor-in-chief of Mechanism and Machine Theory, an international journal.

JOHN B. LAMBERT

JOHN B. LAMBERT (Large image)

JOHN B. LAMBERT

For his contributions in metallurgy and chemical engineering which have been applied in a wide range of industries.

John B. Lambert (PhDChE '56) is vice president and corporate technical director of Fansteel Inc., a refractory and special metal products company serving the electronics, metalworking, coal mining, chemicals, and aerospace industries. He joined the Chicago-based company in 1968. He is listed on ten U.S. and several foreign patents and has contributed several articles to technical journals. He has written on refractory metal technology for Kirk—Othmer: Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology and for The Metals Handbook. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Chemical Society, the American Society for Metals, the Electrochemical Society, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He is an at-large member of Sigma Xi. He serves on the board of directors of the Lake Forest Graduate School of Management. He earned a B.S. in chemical engineering from Princeton in 1951. Born in Billings, Montana, Lambert and his wife, Ilsa, have five children and live in Lake Forest, Illinois.

TERRY O. NORRIS

TERRY O. NORRIS (Large image)

TERRY O. NORRIS

In recognition of his contributions to the pulp and paper industry in Wisconsin and in the nation.

Terry 0. Norris is vice president, research and development Nekoosa Papers Inc., Port Edwards. He began his career with Nekoosa as director of research in 1966, was elected vice president in 1969, and named a director in 1971. For a number of years he has carried out or directed research on pulp, paper, graphic arts, polymer systems, coatings, and light sensitive systems and electrophotography. He has authored or co-authored several technical articles appearing in professional or trade journals. He is active in many civic, humanitarian, and professional organizations including the Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (he is the association's immediate past president). He is a past president of both the Paper Science Foundation and the University Foundation at UW-Stevens Point, a member of the National Archives Advisory Committee, and of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Preservation of Historical Records. He earned a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of North Carolina in 1954.

OSCAR C. BOLDT

OSCAR C. BOLDT (Large image)

OSCAR C. BOLDT

For his leadership in developing Wisconsin's largest construction company.

Oscar C. Boldt (BSCE '48) has served as chief executive officer of the Oscar J. Boldt Construction Company, Appleton, since 1950. During this period, the firm has grown to be Wisconsin's largest general construction contractor, and among the nation's 150 largest contractors and one of the nation's top 75 construction management firms. He was named CEO of the Boldt Holding Corporation, parent company of the Oscar J. Boldt Construction Company, in 1984. He serves on the boards of several major Appleton-based companies (Valley Bancorporation, Pierce Mfg. Company, W.S. Patterson Company, and Midwest Express Airlines), has been involved in many civic and humanitarian organizations including the YMCA, Boy Scouts, and the Appleton Medical Center. He received the Silver Beaver award from the Boy Scouts; the Rotary Vocation Service and Paul Harris Fellow awards from Rotary. He is actively involved in the Memorial Presbyterian Church, where he served as an elder. He is a past president and member of the Appleton Area Chamber of Commerce, a trustee of Lawrence University, and a member of the Fox Valley UW Alumni Association. Boldt and his wife, Patricia, have two sons, Charles and Thomas, and a daughter, Margaret.

JOHN W. ROGERS

JOHN W. ROGERS (Large image)

JOHN W. ROGERS

For his leadership in the construction industry and in construction education.

John W. Rogers was elected chairman and chief executive officer of the Bates & Rogers Construction Corp. in 1979. He studied mechanical engineering at the UW from 1926 to 1929 and then went to work for the corporation. During his 55 years with Bates & Rogers, he has worked on several major dam, bridge, and tunnel projects, including the 1,405 foot Teslin River Bridge in the Yukon Territory. He is a member of the Bascom Hill Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Associated General Contractors of America, and the College of Engineering's Industrial Liaison Council. He is president and director of the Bates & Rogers Foundation, has been a trustee of George Williams College for 29 years, director and vice chairman of Junior Achievement of Chicago, and past president and trustee of the Glen Ellyn YMCA. He was named to the Ohio Contractors Association's Hall of Fame and given the S.G. Chapin Award from George Williams College for special recognition. He was born in Oak Park, Illinois.

NATHANIEL K. ZELAZO

NATHANIEL K. ZELAZO (Large image)

NATHANIEL K. ZELAZO

For his research in electrical and computer engineering, his contributions to the aerospace industry, and his entrepreneurial spirit.

Nathaniel K. Zelazo (MSME '57) founded Astronautics Corporation of America in 1959 and served as its president and chairman of the board until 1984, when he was elected chief executive officer and his son, Ronald E, Zelazo, assumed the presidency. The company specializes in digital data communication systems, flight control display systems for aircraft, space technology, robots and medical monitors. Astronautics has seven facilities in Wisconsin, two in California, and wholly owned subsidiaries in West Germany and Israel. The Astronautics Technology Center in Madison is developing super computers, meteorological systems, and is working on space-related programs. Under Zelazo 's leadership Astronautics has grown to employ more than 1,500 people with annual sales in excess of $120 million. His honors and awards include an honorary Ph.D. from the Milwaukee School of Engineering, the 1985 Engineer of the Year award from the Milwaukee Council of Engineering and Scientific Societies, and the 1984 IEEE Centennial Medal.

JOHN K. DRAEGER

JOHN K. DRAEGER (Large image)

JOHN K. DRAEGER

For his managerial talents and skills in engineering design and automated assembly production systems.

John K. Draeger (BSME '51) is president of the Systems and Controls Division of Giddings & Lewis, a unit of AMCA International. He joined the Gilman Engineering and Manufacturing Company, Janesville, as a design engineer in 1955 and held various managerial positions at Gilman prior to his appointment as general manager in 1973. He was named to his current position in 1984. He is responsible for five facility operations including Gilman Engineering and Manufacturing, the largest producer of automated assembly production systems in the U.S. It is where the Gilman precision mill and drill machine for the GM Fiero was developed that won the 1984 Wisconsin Governor's New Product Award and the N.S.P.E. National Award for medium-sized companies. He is a licensed professional engineer, a member of the ASME, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers. He is also board president of the Cedar Crest Retirement Home and Health Center, and is director of the Rock County National Bank, both in Janesville. He and his wife, Jo, have three children, Constance, Rebecca, and John Jr., all graduates of the University of Wisconsin System.

INYONG HAM

INYONG HAM (Large image)

INYONG HAM

For his leadership in engineering education and for his innovative research in manufacturing systems.

Inyong Ham (PhDME 58) is a professor in the Pennsylvania State University Department of Industrial and Management Systems Engineering. He received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Seoul National University, Korea, in 1948 and his master's in mechanical engineering from the University of Nebraska in 1956. He joined the Penn State faculty in 1958. He has co-authored and contributed to several books and published more than 100 technical papers. He has received many awards including the CAM-I Award, the AIIE Manufacturing Systems Division award, and Excellent Teaching Award and the Outstanding Research Award, both from the Penn State Engineering Society. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and of the American Institute of Industrial Engineers. He is currently a council member of CIRP (an international institution for production research). He is a founding member and 1985-86 president of the North American Manufacturing Research Institute. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Manufacturing Systems and on the editorial advisory committee of the International Journal of Machine Tool Design and Research.

JOHN W. LILLESAND

JOHN W. LILLESAND (Large image)

JOHN W. LILLESAND

In recognition of his skills and innovations in manufacturing engineering and management.

John W. Lillesand (BSME '60) is vice president-technical services of the Kohler Co., Kohler, where he is responsible for corporate plant, industrial, environmental, and utilities engineering; all major capital projects; maintenance, chemical and metallurgical labs; the power house; and all corporate utility systems. Recently he created the office of Operations Support to evaluate and develop state of the art manufacturing technologies such as CAD, CAM, CIM, and automated manufacturing processes. He received his J.D. in 1964 from the UW-Madison, the same year he joined Kohler as staff attorney. He was named assistant secretary in 1968, and associate general counsel in 1971. He was appointed to his present position in 1972. He is a member of the ASME, American Bar Association, Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, Wisconsin Alumni Association, and both the Wisconsin and the Sheboygan County bar associations. He has served on the boards of the Catholic Social Services Advisory Council, the Sheboygan County Urban and Rural Development Council, the Sheboygan County Agency for Comprehensive Health Planning, and the Kohler School District, He and his wife, Kathryn, have five children. Three of their children attend the UW, two in the College of Engineering.

JACK C. BOKROS

JACK C. BOKROS (Large image)

JACK C. BOKROS

For his contribution to health through his research and development of biomaterials.

Jack C. Bokros (BSMet and MSMet; '54 and '55) is president of CarboMedics, an Austin-based company that develops special carbon and other materials for prosthetic applications. His contributions to biomaterials research have earned him the American Carbon Society's Charles E. Pettinos Award, the Society for Biomaterials Clemson University Award, and an IR-100 Award for his research on the application of pyrolytic carbon to heart valves. He has authored more than 90 publications, most on carbon and graphite, and is listed on 40 patents issued or pending. He earned his Ph.D. in 1963 in materials science from the University of California, Berkeley. He has served on the executive board of the American Carbon Committee, the honorary editorial advisory board of the Carbon Journal, and on the editorial board of the Journal of Bioengineering. He was also a director of the Society for Biomaterials.

CARL W. GIESLER

CARL W. GIESLER (Large image)

CARL W. GIESLER

For his leadership in providing energy for the people of Wisconsin and for his contributions to nuclear engineering.

Carl W. Giesler (BSEE '48) began his career as an engineer at the Wisconsin Public Service Corporation's Pulliam Power Plant. He is now vice president, power production, Wisconsin Public Service Corporation, Green Bay. In 1968 he was assigned the responsibility of developing the operating organization to start-up the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant. The plant, in its 11 years of operation, has consistently ranked high for safe operation according to the federal government, places among the world's top plants for worker safety, and is one of America's most reliable nuclear plants while producing power for 20 percent less than a comparable coal power plant. Giesler serves on the Prairie Island Nuclear Plant Safety Audit Committee, is an advisor to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operation in Atlanta, has been a member of the Lake Michigan Utility Study Group, and the Electric Power Research Institute's Fusion Program Committee and New Energy Task Force. He has been active in many civic and humanitarian organizations. The Green Bay native and his wife, Marge, have five children.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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