1984 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

DONALD W. NOVOTNY
Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
The 1984 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

Y. AUSTIN CHANG
Professor, Metallurgical and Mineral Engineering
Chairman, Metallurgical and Mineral Engineering
The 1984 Byron Bird Award

LAXMANGUDI K. DORAISWAMY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HAROLD K. FORSEN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROBERT A. GREENKORN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GEORGE J. HESS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HENRY K. NEWHALL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HARRY W. RUBINSTEIN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GEORGE W. SWENSON, JR.
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GERALD H. TELETZKE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

BJORN J. THOMPSON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES J. WERT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DONALD W. NOVOTNY

DONALD W. NOVOTNY (Large image)

DONALD W. NOVOTNY

David W. Novotny, this year's winner of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award for outstanding teaching of engineering students, has taught a good share of the undergraduate courses in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering's curriculum. He earned his BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and taught there for one year. In 1958 he came to the UW-Madison as an instructor. He received his PhD and became an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering in 1961. He teachers electrical machinery and control systems, including courses in basis circuits and systems.

According to Novotny, "I tried teaching at IIT and found it was a ball. I've been able to get students motivated and excited, and I like what I'm doing."

Novotny believes that research and industrial contacts are extremely important to teaching. He is active as consultant to electric motor companies and has taught people from the industry through Extension Engineering. "Part of my research has been prompted by questions about phenomena people have observed in the field but were not understood," says Novotny. "These problems often become topics for master's theses and end up being incorporated into the classroom, usually at the senior level."

Novotny became a full professor in 1968 and was chairman of the department from 1976 to 1980. He has also been an associate chairman in charge of the undergraduate program. He spent 10 months in 1974 and 1975 at the Technological University, Eindhoven, The Netherlands, as a visiting professor and 5 months in 1981 as a Fulbright lecturer at the Technical University of Gent, Belgium. "At a university you get to make your own career," he says. "There is a great variety of things that you can do, and I've taken advantage of most of them. I've been chairman and taught only one course; right now I have 9 or 10 grad students doing machine and power electronics research, and we have an industrial consortium of 17 companies supporting the work. I like to change what I'm doing every 4 or 5 years; it helps keep me form getting stale."

Y. AUSTIN CHANG

Y. AUSTIN CHANG (Large image)

Y. AUSTIN CHANG

The fifth recipient of the Byron Bird Award for an outstanding research publication is Y. Austin Chang, professor and chairman of metallurgical and mineral engineering.

Chang received the Bird Award for a series of three pioneering papers that have had an impact on the field of solution thermodynamics. In these papers, Chang discusses his work with binary systems—combination of two elements such as carbon and silicon that form an alloy or a compound. He has developed equations that may be used for calculating phase diagrams. Phase diagrams show stable arrangements of compounds and alloys as a function of composition and temperature. These equations have been valuable to scientists and engineers and are widely used.

His work has applications for every industry where metals are used alone or in combination with other materials. According to John Wiley, director of the Materials Science Program, "If a scientist or an engineer wants to develop an alloy, the first thing she or he has to do is to determine its phase diagram. With Chang's equations, scientists and engineers can make computer calculations and analytical calculations to determine the thermodynamic properties of binary and multicomponent systems."

Letters supporting Chang's papers for the Byron Bird Award came from experts in industries and universities in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Iowa, Washington, Arizona, Alabama, Germany, and Austria.

Chang earned his BS in chemical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, his MS from the University of Washington, Seattle, and returned to the University of California to earn his PhD in metallurgy in 1963. He worked in industry in California and taught at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee before coming to this university in 1980. He has been chairman since 1982.

LAXMANGUDI K. DORAISWAMY

LAXMANGUDI K. DORAISWAMY (Large image)

LAXMANGUDI K. DORAISWAMY

For his contributions to chemical engineering science and to the chemical industry of India.

Laxmangudi K. Doraiswamy (MSChE '50; PhD ChE '52) is director of an outstanding laboratory in chemical reaction engineering, the National Chemical Laboratory in Poona, India. Over a dozen chemical processes were developed under his supervision that are now used in the food, pharmaceutical, dye, plastics, and fibers industries. As a visiting professor in the UW-Madison Department of Chemical Engineering, he directed research on a process for extracting low grade zinc ores in northern Wisconsin. Two of nine national and international awards that he has received are the Homi Bhabha Award for applied sciences from the University Grants Commission and the Husain Zaheer Medal of the Indian National Science Academy for outstanding contributions in engineering and technology. He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Science from the University of Salford, United Kingdom, in 1982, the first Indian to receive such an honor. His wife died last year. He has a son and a daughter.

HAROLD K. FORSEN

HAROLD K. FORSEN (Large image)

HAROLD K. FORSEN

For his contributions to the areas of laser isotope separation, controlled thermonuclear research, and industrial systems.

Harold K. Forsen (BSEE '58 and MSEE '59, California Institute of Technology; PhD EE '65, University of California-Berkeley) is manager of the Advanced Systems Department at Bechtel National Inc., San Francisco, California. In 1965 he became a professor in the UW-Madison Department of Nuclear Engineering. He also served as director of the university's Physical Sciences Laboratory from 1970-1972. In 1973 he joined the Exxon Nuclear Company, Bellevue, Washington. He was responsible for management and direction of Exxon's laser isotope separation program. He is currently responsible for directing Bechtel National projects relating to magnetic and inertial fusion systems, particle accelerators, lasers in space and isotope separation, NASA, and the U.S. Department of Defense. He has supervised projects in power technology, nuclear systems, application engineering, and energy systems. He credits much of his success to the help of his wife Betty. They have two sons and a daughter.

ROBERT A. GREENKORN

ROBERT A. GREENKORN (Large image)

ROBERT A. GREENKORN

For his research leading to more efficient use of natural gas and petroleum resources and his contributions to engineering education.

Robert A. Greenkorn (BSChE '54; MSChE '55; PhD ChE '57) is vice president and associate provost at Purdue University, Layfayette, Indiana. He has also served as head of chemical engineering, director of the Institute for Advanced Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies, and director of the Engineering Experiment Station at Purdue. He does fundamental research on the physical properties of hydrocarbons and the mechanics of fluid flow in porous media. This research has led to more efficient use of natural gas and petroleum resources. He has published three books, Transfer Operations, Thermodynamics of Fluids: An Introduction to Equilibrium Theory, and Flow Phenomena in Porous Media. In the last book he shares his 25 years of personal experience on the applications of fluid mechanics to petroleum engineering, groundwater hydrology, and soils science. He and his wife Rosemary have a son and two daughters.

GEORGE J. HESS

GEORGE J. HESS (Large image)

GEORGE J. HESS

For his leadership role in the development and implementation of computer-integrated manufacturing systems.

George J. Hess (BSEE '46) is vice president, systems and planning, Ingersoll Milling Machine Company, Rockford, Illinois, where he led development of a computer-integrated manufacturing system. This installation has received worldwide acclaim and recognition. In 1946 he began his career at General Electric Company, where he was in charge of the design and field installation of large fully automated computer-controlled systems. He Joined Beloit Corporation in 1964 and Ingersoll in 1974. He received the prestigious Wisconsin Alumni Association National Spark Plug Award in 1979. He was instrumental in Ingersoll receiving the LEAD Award in 1982 from the Computer and Automated Systems Association of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers for outstanding leadership and excellence in the application and development of computer-integrated manufacturing. He and his wife Jean have three children, all UW-Madison graduates.

HENRY K. NEWHALL

HENRY K. NEWHALL (Large image)

HENRY K. NEWHALL

For his contributions to a clean environment, the more economical use of scarce resources, and engineering education.

Henry K. Newhall (BSME '61, MSME '63, and PhD ME '66, University of California-Berkeley) is manager of the Fuels Division, Chevron Research Company, Richmond, California. In 1966 he became a professor at the UW-Madison Department of Mechanical Engineering. His PhD thesis is still the basis for computing nitrogen oxide emissions from engines. While at the university, he developed graduate courses in air pollution and combustion kinetics. In 1972 he joined Chevron as a staff engineer in engine fuels research. He is responsible for research, development, and performance evaluation of motor gasoline, diesel and aviation fuels, and heavy engine fuels. He serves as a contact for automobile and engine manufacturers and government agencies involved in fuel technology and related areas of environmental control. He has served on technical committees at both the state and national level and has continued his close relationship with the university. He and his wife Janice have two daughters and two sons.

HARRY W. RUBINSTEIN

HARRY W. RUBINSTEIN (Large image)

HARRY W. RUBINSTEIN

For his innovations in the technology of printed electronic circuits and the fabrication of capacitors.

Harry W. Rubinstein (BSEE '27) was president of Sprague Electric Company, Grafton, Wisconsin, from 1952 until 1970. He retired in 1971. Faced with problems of weight, space, and shortage of strategic materials, he developed the printed electronic circuit for the proximity fuse used in bombs in World War II. That project, in addition to the work of the National Bureau of Standards, was the forerunner of the laminated plastic base printed circuits so widely used today. In 1946, he was a cofounder of Herlec Corporation, which concentrated on manufacturing and distributing ceramic disc capacitors. Herlec merged with Sprague Electric in 1948. Mr. Rubinstein was responsible for Sprague's Grafton, Wisconsin, plant, set up factories in Nashua, New Hampshire, and Hillsville. Virginia, and was a consultant to many of Sprague's 31 factories worldwide. He helped improve manufacturing processes, reduce costs, and avoid duplication of facilities and effort. He holds 19 U.S. patents. He and his wife Else have a daughter and two sons.

GEORGE W. SWENSON, JR.

GEORGE W. SWENSON, JR. (Large image)

GEORGE W. SWENSON, JR.

For his contributions to the field of radio astronomy and to electrical engineering education.

George W. Swenson, Jr. (BSEE '44, Michigan College of Mining and Technology; MSEE '48, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; PhD EE '51, UW-Madison) is professor and department head of electrical and computer engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has been a faculty member at Washington University in St. Louis, the University of Alaska, and Michigan State University. From 1964 to 1968 he was with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, where he supervised the conceptual design of the Very Large Array radio telescope, completed in New Mexico in 1980. As director of the Vermilion River Observatory, he designed, built, and managed two large, innovative radio telescopes for the University of Illinois He has designed and constructed antennas and satellites for space research, including four ionosphere research satellites for the U.S. Air Force. Many of his research publications deal with astronomical observations, and he served as acting head of the University of Illinois Astronomy Department from 1969 to 1971. He is a Guggenheim Fellow for 1984-85 and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His wife's name is Janice. He has four children.

GERALD H. TELETZKE

GERALD H. TELETZKE (Large image)

GERALD H. TELETZKE

For his contributions to environmental protection through the development of innovative waste treatment methods.

Gerald H. Teletzke (BSCE '52; MSCE '53; PhD CE '56) is president of Zimpro Inc., Rothschild, Wisconsin. He was a professor at Purdue University from 1956 to 1959 While at Zimpro he led work on the improvement of a process for wet air oxidation of industrial wastes and sludge. He was able to apply the process commercially by the early 1970s, and sludge oxidation units have been installed in many wastewater treatment plants around the world. Based on his successes, the company has grown from a small research-oriented organization to a major research engineering and construction firm. The company is recognized as a leader in wastewater sludge treatment and combustion, wastewater purification, and detoxification of hazardous and toxic waste. A recently completed facility for a chemical company in Michigan won the President's Council on Environmental Quality Award for Hazardous Waste Management in 1983. He and his wife Elaine have a son and a daughter.

BJORN J. THOMPSON

BJORN J. THOMPSON (Large image)

BJORN J. THOMPSON

For his contributions to the meat industry and to the growth and development of Wisconsin industry.

Bjorn J. Thompson (BSME '57) is vice president, fresh meal operations, Oscar Mayer and Company, Madison, Wisconsin. He has been with the company since 1960. For the last six years, as vice president of engineering and development, he has been responsible for facilities planning, engineering, construction, automation, cost improvement, and annual capital expenditure program activities as the corporation grew from 5 to 21 operating facilities. He has enhanced the productivity of scarce resources through innovative industrial engineering He has encouraged extensive activity in energy-related areas such as waste treatment, energy, heat recovery, cogeneration, and coal-fired systems. He was promoted to his current position last May and continues to look for opportunities to automate the fresh meat division and to use robotics technology. He and his wife Gail have three children, Kai, who is a University of Wisconsin engineering graduate (BSME '82), and Kristen and Kirk, who are currently attending the UW-Madison.

JAMES J. WERT

JAMES J. WERT (Large image)

JAMES J. WERT

For his leadership in engineering education and his research in materials science and in friction and wear.

James J. Wert (BSMet '57; MSMet '58; PhD Met '61) is a George A. Sloan Professor of Metallurgy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. He went to Vanderbilt as an assistant professor in 1961. He developed a curriculum in metallurgy for both undergraduate and graduate students and helped recruit faculty and raise funds for the program. Through his efforts, the materials science program is now housed in Olin Hall. This building has some of the most sophisticated research and teaching facilities in the Southeast. He has served as chairman of materials science and engineering and as chairman of mechanical and materials engineering. While he was involved in administration almost continuously from 1964 until 1982, he was also very active as a researcher in tribology (lubrication, friction, and wear). In 1974 he spent a semester at Cambridge University as a visiting professor and in 1982 accepted a Senior Fulbright Lectureship in the Middle East. He and his wife Jane have two children.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
Accessibility

Web services
Copyright 2010 The Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System