1983 Award Recipients

CHARLES G. HILL, JR.
Professor, Chemical Engineering
The 1983 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

W. ROBERT MARSHALL
Professor, Chemical Engineering, Director, University-Industry Research Program
The 1983 Byron Bird Award

EARL J. BECK
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RUSSELL J. CHRISTESEN
JOB TITLE 4
1983 Bollinger Academic Staff Award

JOHN E. GWYN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DONALD A. GYOROG
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JOHN H. JOHNSON
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GLENN R. PETERSEN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

WILLIAM R. SCHOWALTER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CLAUDE R. WHITNEY
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CHARLES G. HILL, JR.

CHARLES G. HILL, JR. (Large image)

CHARLES G. HILL, JR.

Because of the significant contributions he has made to teaching future engineers, chemical engineering professor Charles G. Hill, Jr. is this year's winner of the Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award.

Professor Hill deserves recognition as a distinguished teacher because of his commitment to the education of chemical engineering students in the principles of thermodynamics, kinetics, catalysis, and reactor design. A colleague considers his "teaching capabilities to be tops in the department."

Hill is the author of an introductory text on kinetics, catalysis, and reactor design. Another colleague in the department says, "[Hill] wrote what I believe will be the standard text in the field for the next 10 years.... It is well organized, thoroughly researched, clear, and comprehensive."

In addition to his classroom teaching, Hill has supervised an active research program in kinetics and catalysis at the graduate level. His research has also covered the application of chemical engineering techniques to the food industry. This cooperative program with the Department of Food Science has enabled Hill and several of his graduate students to make significant contributions to the solution of food industry waste disposal problems.

Professor Hill is the Department of Chemical Engineering's associate chairman for graduate affairs. He has been a member, and was chairman for several years, of the graduate student selection committee.

Hill received the SB, SM, and ScD degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty in 1967. He has received the departmental Polygon Teaching Award six times since its inception in the late 1960s. In 1979 he won a campus-wide Distinguished Teaching Award. He was also selected by Tau Beta Pi as the Outstanding Teacher in the College of Engineering for 1982-83.

W. ROBERT MARSHALL

W. ROBERT MARSHALL (Large image)

W. ROBERT MARSHALL

W. Robert Marshall, professor of chemical engineering, former dean of the College of Engineering, and director of the University-Industry Research Program, is the fourth recipient of the Byron Bird Award.

Marshall will receive the award for his research monograph, Atomization and Spray Drying, which has provided guidance for many years in the field of spray processing—both in research and in industrial design. In this monograph, Marshall showed how to use applied mathematics, fluid dynamics, transport phenomena, statistics, and physical chemistry to solve critical engineering problems in atomization and spray drying. He developed the subject in such a way as to obtain final design methods, performance characteristics, and information about product quality.

The monograph is a key source of information for industrial practitioners and for university researchers. An administrator for the Procter & Gamble Company wrote, "... using many of the principles described in this publication, we have improved equipment capacity nearly 10 fold .... When you consider that we produce approximately 2 billion pounds of spray dried products annually, these improvements were and are of obvious economic value."

The most recent text on unit operations lists Atomization and Spray Drying and several of Marshall's research papers as references at the end of a chapter on drying. Unit operations is a standard junior and senior course in almost all chemical engineering curricula.

Professor Marshall received the BS and PhD Degrees in chemical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin respectively. He Joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty in 1947.

EARL J. BECK

EARL J. BECK (Large image)

EARL J. BECK

For his leadership in design and construction of some of history's largest civil engineering works, including hydroelectric irrigation, and flood control projects.

Earl J. Beck (BSCE '44; MSCE '46) is executive vice-president of Harza Engineering Company, Chicago, Illinois, one of the leading international consulting engineering firms. He is responsible for the company's operation and has contributed to major water projects as a designer, chief engineer, and now as executive vice-president. He accepted a position as junior engineer with Harza in 1947. His responsibilities increased resulting in promotions to squad leader, section head, and department head. He served as chief engineer, in charge of resolving all engineering questions, from 1971 to 1979. As chief engineer Mr. Beck has had a dramatic impact on some of the world's largest civil engineering projects, including the Derbendi Khan project in Iraq, the Angat project in the Philippines, the Brokopondo project in Surinam, the Mangia project in Pakistan, and the Guri project in Venezuela. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers National Energy Policy Committee and chairman of the Hydraulics Committee for the U.S. Committee on Large Dams.

RUSSELL J. CHRISTESEN

RUSSELL J. CHRISTESEN (Large image)

RUSSELL J. CHRISTESEN

For his contributions to the negotiation and formation of a national Nuclear Power Construction Stabilization Agreement to be implemented on our nuclear construction sites.

Russell J. Christesen (BSCE '46) is president and chief operating officer of Ebasco Services Inc., New York, New York. He joined Ebasco in 1952 as a resident engineer. As construction superintendent, project manager, and construction manager, he was directly responsible for the construction and commissioning of 17 electric generating units totaling over 8.3 million kilowatts. He has had corporate responsibility for the engineering, design, and construction of more than 60 fossil-fueled, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants in the U.S and overseas, totaling more than 37.4 million kilowatts. He was instrumental in negotiating a national Nuclear Power Construction Stabilization Agreement. Representatives from four companies, Ebasco, Bechtel, United Engineers, and Stone & Webster, met in 1977 to form this agreement which does not depend on other collective bargaining agreements in the construction industry. The agreement provides procedures for resolving labor questions without strikes, lockouts, or other interruptions of work operation. Mr. Christesen continues to participate with the other representatives at monthly meetings held in Washington, DC. He is a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers and is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

JOHN E. GWYN

JOHN E. GWYN (Large image)

JOHN E. GWYN

For his contributions to reactor mechanics and fluid dynamics research in oil, chemical, and coal and shale processing.

John E. Gwyn (BS ChE '50 University of Colorado; MS ChE '52; PhD ChE '55) went to work in 1955 for Shell Oil Company in Houston, Texas, where he has spent his entire career. In 1977 he was promoted to research engineer at Shell Development Company, a title reserved for those who have established a record of major technical accomplishments. He has also been named senior research associate. As an applied researcher his goal has been to have his work result in successful commercial applications. His efforts frequently have added to knowledge of basic engineering concepts and have had broad applications. He is the holder or coholder of nine important patents. Some of his innovations include a new theory of coking in the quench area of pyrolysis reactors, a fluidized waste incinerator used by Shell to burn waste containing fusible salts, an improved method of recovering oil shale reserves, and a novel coal cleaning process that makes it possible to separate refuse from coal or minerals. He is active in the Sierra Club developing and maintaining hiking trails in Texas and in national forest use planning.

DONALD A. GYOROG

DONALD A. GYOROG (Large image)

DONALD A. GYOROG

For his contributions to U.S. Army armament research in large and small caliber weapons, ballistics, and CAD systems.

Donald A. Gyorog (PhD ME '63) is associate technical director for Systems Concept and Technology, U.S. Army Armament Research and Development Command in Dover, New Jersey. He was an associate professor of mechanical engineering from the University of Iowa for six years. He then joined the faculty of the University of Missouri, Rolla, for two years where he developed an outstanding laboratory in pneumatic, hydraulic, and fluidic systems. During this same time period he was a consultant to Rock Island Arsenal, U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command, St. Louis, which led to his appointment as staff engineer. In 1976 he was selected to lead a team in planning and designing the Army's newest research and development laboratory, the Fire Control and Small Caliber Weapons Systems Laboratory, Dover. From 1977 to 1982, he helped develop over 50 new or product-improved items and established a Joint Services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard) Program for future small arms development. In his present position, Mr. Gyorog is responsible for four major research laboratories and 4,000 civilian employees, which include approximately 2,400 engineers and scientists. The organization has a yearly budget of $150,000,000.

JOHN H. JOHNSON

JOHN H. JOHNSON (Large image)

JOHN H. JOHNSON

For his contribution through research to the development of procedures for monitoring harmful engine pollutants and measuring wear in diesel engines.

John H. Johnson (BSME '59; MSME '64; PhD '64) is presidential professor of mechanical engineering in the Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics Department at Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan. He began his career as a project engineer at the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Command in 1964. In 1966 he became chief engineer in applied engine research for International Harvester Company, where he helped develop two of that firm's most successful engines. He joined the faculty of Michigan Technological University in 1970. His research has focused on the measurement and control of particulates in diesel engine emissions. He has also helped develop a new particle wear measurement method called ferrography. Recently his group developed an advanced diesel truck cooling system computer model which has been used to guide the design and testing of the first microprocessor-controlled diesel engine cooling system. He has published more than 80 papers and reports and consulted for more than 20 industry and government organizations.

GLENN R. PETERSEN

GLENN R. PETERSEN (Large image)

GLENN R. PETERSEN

For his contributions to the design, development, and production of communication and building security systems.

Glenn R. Petersen (BSEE '50) is president and chief operating officer of Simplex Time Recorder Company, Gardner, Massachusetts. He is responsible for the company's worldwide operations including wholly-owned subsidiary companies in Canada and Australia. He joined Simplex, a leader in attendance recorders and clock systems, as executive vice-president in 1975. Under his direction, Simplex has developed microprocessor-based multiplex systems for fire alarms, security, and clock control for industrial and commercial buildings. In 1980 Simplex was the first company to introduce microprocessor-based electronic time recorders. Before joining Simplex, Mr. Petersen spent 25 years with the General Electric Company, where he served as marketing manager, communications products division, and general manager, mobile radio products department. He served as a member and principal spokesman for the U.S. Communications Trade Mission to the U.S.S.R. and Poland in 1972 and has held a number of positions in the Electronics Industry Association. He is active in church and community service and has been a director of the YMCA and a board member of the Salvation Army.

WILLIAM R. SCHOWALTER

WILLIAM R. SCHOWALTER (Large image)

WILLIAM R. SCHOWALTER

For his contributions as a researcher and educator in the field of fluid mechanics, especially as a discipline transcending specific engineering fields.

William R. Schowalter (BS ChE '51; MS ChE '53; PhD ChE '57 University of Illinois) has spent his career at Princeton University. He joined the faculty in 1957 as an assistant professor, became a professor in 1966, and was made chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering in 1978. From 1972 to 1977 he also served as associate dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. His research deals with the flow of polymer melts, polymer solutions, suspensions, and colloids. His most recent activities include studies of cavitation dynamics in viscoelastic fluids and the dynamics of coagulation of colloids in shear fields. He is known particularly for his development of a mechanics of fluids applicable to the wide variety of non-Newtonian materials frequently encountered in chemical engineering technology. He was one of the original developers of boundary-layer theory for non-Newtonian fluids. Professor Schowalter has held numerous professional committee assignments through the National Research Council, the Society of Rheology, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is a member of the evaluation panel for the Center for Chemical Engineering at the National Bureau of Standards. He is president elect of the Society of Rheology.

CLAUDE R. WHITNEY

CLAUDE R. WHITNEY (Large image)

CLAUDE R. WHITNEY

For his contributions to the technology of precise industrial controls, to the growth of American and Wisconsin industry, and to the greater Milwaukee community.

Claude R. Whitney (BSEE '50) is chairman and chief executive officer of Allen-Bradley Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He began his career as an application engineer at Square D Company in 1952. At Square D he designed a circuit for Chrysler multispot welders which automatically made up to 200 spot welds on an auto body and controlled mechanical handling of the parts. Chrysler subsequently purchased more than 30 of the large units in a two-year period. As a supervisor of Square D's general purpose control section, he recommended and later headed a new product section devoted to the development and market penetration of new products. He participated in the planning and development of a new line of solid state digital logic control called NORPAK. The product became a significant part of the Square D line. In the 1970s, as product manager and marketing manager for Allen-Bradley's industrial control division, he headed a project team to design and develop the company's 2100 Control Center currently produced in Richland Center. From 1975 to 1979, when Mr. Whitney was head of this division, sales increased 100 percent. He frequently speaks to professional groups and has presented papers for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is a member of the UW-Madison College of Engineering Industrial Liaison Council.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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