1981 Award Recipients

WARREN E. STEWART
Professor, Chemical Engineering
The 1981 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

JOHN A. DUFFIE
Professor Chemical Engineering
The 1981 Byron Bird Award

WILLIAM A. BECKMAN
Professor Mechanical Engineering
The 1981 Byron Bird Award

WARREN E. ALBERTS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ANTHONY T. DiBENEDETTO
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

T. KENNETH FOWLER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DONALD J. HELFRECHT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

HAROLD R. LELAND
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

LEE R. RAYMOND
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JEROME G. RIVARD
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GERARD A. ROHLICH
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES J. SCOTT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

WARREN E. STEWART

WARREN E. STEWART (Large image)

WARREN E. STEWART

Warren Stewart received the BS ChE and the MS ChE degrees from the University of Wisconsin in 1945 and 1947 respectively. He received the ScD degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1951. He was a Project Chemical Engineer with Sinclair Research Laboratories for several years before joining the College of Engineering faculty in 1956 as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to Professor in 1961 and served as Chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering from 1973 to 1978.

Professor Stewart's teaching is inventive, since he continuously develops new and better ways of presenting material. He takes great pains to focus on the key points and to illustrate them carefully. His carefully chosen examples and problems show tremendous originality. His knowledge of chemical engineering covers a broad spectrum so that he can relate his teaching to other areas as well as assist graduate students in solving research problems. His friendly manner encourages students to feel at ease with him, and they readily seek him out for advice. A colleague characterized him as a thoroughly responsible and inspiring teacher and a very good friend.

Together with Professors R. B. Bird and E. N. Lightfoot, Warren Stewart developed a course in Transport Phenomena and coauthored a textbook, which has been published in Italian, Czech, Spanish, and Russian as well as English. This text has made the subject of transport phenomena a standard course in chemical engineering curricula, and it is widely used in other disciplines.

Professor Stewart is the author of more than 60 published papers. His election as a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering is only one of the honors he has received.

JOHN A. DUFFIE

JOHN A. DUFFIE (Large image)

JOHN A. DUFFIE

The research publication selected for the 1981 Byron Bird Award is Solar Energy Thermal Processes, coauthored by John A. Duffie, Professor of Chemical Engineering, and William A. Beckman, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. This book has had a tremendous influence in many parts of the world and is characterized as the prime reference source for solar energy research by colleagues from these areas. It has served to shape the thinking and design developments in solar energy throughout the world. One colleague said, "Virtually every research worker and most consultants and practitioners in the field appear to have a copy." A research group described the book as its starting point for all new work in the field. More than 60 percent of the articles published in the Solar Energy Journal during the last five years have made reference to this book. This landmark text has established Professors Duffie and Beckman and the University of Wisconsin–Madison as leaders in the field of solar energy.

Professor Duffie received the Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute in 1943 and 1948 respectively. He received the PhD degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1951. He joined the College of Engineering staff in 1954 and has been Director of the College's Solar Energy Laboratory since 1956.

Professor Beckman received the Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Mechanical Engineering and the PhD degree in 1958, 1960, and 1964 respectively from the University of Michigan. He joined the College of Engineering faculty in 1963. He received the Solar Energy Division Centennial Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1980.

Both Professors Duffie and Beckman have been the authors or coauthors of more than forty published technical articles and both have been honored as Fulbright Scholars.

WILLIAM A. BECKMAN

WILLIAM A. BECKMAN (Large image)

WILLIAM A. BECKMAN

The research publication selected for the 1981 Byron Bird Award is Solar Energy Thermal Processes, coauthored by John A. Duffie, Professor of Chemical Engineering, and William A. Beckman, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. This book has had a tremendous influence in many parts of the world and is characterized as the prime reference source for solar energy research by colleagues from these areas. It has served to shape the thinking and design developments in solar energy throughout the world. One colleague said, "Virtually every research worker and most consultants and practitioners in the field appear to have a copy." A research group described the book as its starting point for all new work in the field. More than 60 percent of the articles published in the Solar Energy Journal during the last five years have made reference to this book. This landmark text has established Professors Duffie and Beckman and the University of Wisconsin–Madison as leaders in the field of solar energy.

Professor Duffie received the Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnical Institute in 1943 and 1948 respectively. He received the PhD degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1951. He joined the College of Engineering staff in 1954 and has been Director of the College's Solar Energy Laboratory since 1956.

Professor Beckman received the Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Mechanical Engineering and the PhD degree in 1958, 1960, and 1964 respectively from the University of Michigan. He joined the College of Engineering faculty in 1963. He received the Solar Energy Division Centennial Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1980.

Both Professors Duffie and Beckman have been the authors or coauthors of more than forty published technical articles and both have been honored as Fulbright Scholars.

WARREN E. ALBERTS

WARREN E. ALBERTS (Large image)

WARREN E. ALBERTS

Vice-President, Systems Operations (Retired), United Airlines, Hinsdale, Illinois.

For his significant contributions to major improvements of the reservations, scheduling, and maintenance operations of the nation's airlines.

Born, Two Rivers, Wisconsin, September 20, 1916.

BS ME 1938, University of Wisconsin.

Mr. Alberts began his career as Chief Engineer of the Midwest Gas Burner Company in 1938. Following his service as an officer and pilot in the United States Eighth Air Force in World War II, he joined United Airlines in 1946 as an industrial engineer. He was appointed Director of Corporate Industrial Engineering in 1953 and elected Vice-President five years later. He became Vice-President, Management Services and Controls in 1961 and Vice-President, Systems Operations Services in 1971. He retired as an officer of United Airlines in 1980.

During his career with United Airlines he contributed greatly to the application of computer technology to the management of the airline industry. Included in these applications were passenger reservation, maintenance, and scheduling operations of the company. He also developed the specifications for the first flight simulator and originated the design concept for the "Quick Convertible" airplane, which can be converted from passenger to freight operations in thirty minutes.

Mr. Alberts served as a consultant to the Secretary of Commerce, where he was instrumental in developing the Civil Reserve Air Fleet Plan to use commercial aircraft effectively in national emergencies.

He has been active in several professional organizations and served as President of the Engineers Joint Council.

ANTHONY T. DiBENEDETTO

ANTHONY T. DiBENEDETTO (Large image)

ANTHONY T. DiBENEDETTO

Vice-President for Academic Affairs, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut.

For his notable contributions to developments and applications of reinforced polymeric materials and to the growth of graduate education in engineering.

Born, New York City, New York, October 27, 1933.

BS ChE 1955, City College of New York; MS ChE 1956 and PhD ChE 1960, University of Wisconsin.

Dr. DiBenedetto's lifelong interest in composite materials developed when he worked for the Bakelite Division of Union Carbide Company during his college career and immediately after graduation. He began his teaching career as a chemical engineering instructor at the University of Wisconsin, where he developed a polymer materials sequence and was chairman of the committee to develop an interdisciplinary program in Materials Engineering. In 1966 he joined the faculty of Washington University in St. Louis, where he helped to develop a new graduate program in materials engineering. In 1971 he joined the faculty of the University of Connecticut as professor and head of the Department of Chemical Engineering. He was appointed to his present position in 1981.

Dr. DiBenedetto was among the first to apply the principle of fracture mechanics to commercially important reinforced plastic composite materials. He served as a consultant in fiber-reinforced plastics on a United Nations program in Israel. He also worked with universities in South America and Mexico to develop programs in reinforced plastics.

He is the author of several books and numerous technical articles. Among the several awards he has received are the Outstanding Educators of America Award in 1973 and the Educational Service Award of the Plastics Institute of America in 1974. He has also been active in professional organizations and in the editing of professional journals.

ANTHONY T. DiBENEDETTO

T. KENNETH FOWLER (Large image)

T. KENNETH FOWLER

Associate Director for Magnetic Fusion Energy Program, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California.

For his creative development of new fusion concepts, which have contributed significantly to the search for solutions to controlled thermonuclear fusion power.

Born, Thomaston, Georgia, March 27, 1931.

BS Engineering 1953 and MS (Physics) 1955, Vanderbilt University; PhD (Physics) 1957, University of Wisconsin.

On completion of his graduate study, Dr. Fowler joined the staff of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1957 and was appointed Group Leader of the Plasma Theory activity at the Laboratory in 1962. After serving with General Atomic for two years, he joined Lawrence Livermore Laboratory as Group Leader, Plasma Theory, in 1967. He was appointed to his present position in 1970.

For more than 24 years Dr. Fowler has carried on research in plasma physics aimed toward the development of controlled thermonuclear fusion. Through his fundamental theoretical investigations and perceptive analyses of experiments, he has created new fusion concepts that are contributing significantly to the search for solutions to controlled thermonuclear fusion power. His leadership and direction have stimulated other technical people in their work. He is recognized as one of the leading people in the world in this field and directs one of the largest efforts of study of fusion power in the United States. Through his leadership, the mirror fusion laboratory at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is preeminent in the world.

He is author or coauthor of nearly 50 technical publications and has served as a member of several national scientific committees such as the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Standing Committee of the Atomic Energy Commission. He has been an active leader in the work of the American Physical Society.

DONALD J. HELFRECHT

DONALD J. HELFRECHT (Large image)

DONALD J. HELFRECHT

President and Chief Executive Officer, Madison Gas and Electric Company, Madison, Wisconsin.

For his notable contributions to the increased reliability of electric power in southern Wisconsin.

Born, Madison, Wisconsin, February 22, 1922.

BS EE 1944, University of Wisconsin.

Following graduation, Mr. Helfrecht served as an Army Officer in World War II, then joined the Madison Gas and Electric Company as a draftsman in 1946. Since that time he has served this company in positions of increasing responsibility for his entire professional career. He was promoted to Manager, Electric Systems Operation in 1966; to Executive Vice-President in 1974; and to his present position in 1980. He has been responsible for designing or directing the design of several high-voltage transmission systems such as the 75,000-kilowatt underground lines that bring power to the main plant and serve the west side of Madison.

He also supervised the design, development, and construction of the 345-kilovolt high-voltage transmission system between Madison, the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant, and the Columbia Energy Center. In addition, he made major contributions to developing the high-voltage transmission system to interconnect major electric utilities in southeastern Wisconsin.

Mr. Helfrecht actively serves in several professional organizations and is Chairman of the Board of the Wisconsin Utilities Association. In addition, he has served actively in community organizations. In 1977 he was chosen as "Engineer of the Year in Industry" by the Southwest Chapter of the Wisconsin Society of Professional Engineers.

HAROLD R. LELAND

HAROLD R. LELAND (Large image)

HAROLD R. LELAND

Vice President, Calspan and General Manager, Calspan Advanced Technology Center, Buffalo, New York.

For his outstanding contributions to the development of automatic systems for civil and military aviation.

Born, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, April 18, 1931.

BS EE 1954, MS EE 1954, PhD EE 1958, University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Leland joined the staff of Calspan Inc., then the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, as a Research and Principal Engineer, in 1958. He has served this organization for his entire professional career in positions of increasing responsibility. He was appointed Head of the Systems Research Department in 1970 and was promoted to Vice President and Director of the Electronic Systems Group in 1971. He was appointed to his present position as Vice President of Calspan, General Manager of Calspan Advanced Technology Center, and President of Calspan Field Services in 1978.

Dr. Leland's initial research in the theory of automatic controls and the development of algorithms for military tactical data systems led to the development of many electronic systems that have greatly increased the electronics warfare capability of the nation's military air forces. Among these developments are Adaptive Automatic Control Systems, Automatic Photo Interpretation, and Penetration Aids for Manned Aircraft. Some of these devices are also used in commercial aircraft resulting in safer air transportation.

As the first President of Calspan Technology Products Incorporated, he established a new subsidiary corporation and was responsible for the development, production, and marketing of products such as an oil-free air compressor and an automated fingerprint identification system.

He has served as an Ad Hoc Adviser to the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and is a member of several professional societies. He is also active in a number of civic organizations in his community.

LEE R. RAYMOND

LEE R. RAYMOND (Large image)

LEE R. RAYMOND

Executive Vice President, Exxon Enterprises Incorporated, New York City, New York.

For his significant technological contributions to meeting our nation's energy requirements by improved production and distribution methods and the development of new sources.

Born, Watertown, South Dakota, August 13, 1938.

BS ChE 1960, University of Wisconsin; PhD ChE 1963, University of Minnesota.

Dr. Raymond joined Exxon as a Production Research Engineer in 1963. He has spent his entire professional career with this company, and he has been promoted rapidly to positions of increasing responsibility in various domestic and foreign affiliates of the Corporation. In 1966, as Data Processing Supervisor of Creole Petroleum Corporation in Venezuela, he formulated program models for production, refining, and transportation operations. Two years later, as Supervisory Supply Analyst with Exxon Company USA, he was responsible for planning and scheduling that company's product supply distribution system. Later with Exxon International Company, he was responsible for planning Exxon's Eastern Hemisphere crude oil and product supply operations and still later, the worldwide supply and transportation activities. In 1975 he became President and Chief Executive Officer of Lago Oil and Transportation Company in the Netherlands Antilles, where he was responsible for the operation of the world's sixth largest refinery and a crude oil transshipment facility that handled 600,000 barrels per day. In 1979 he became President and Chief Executive Officer of Exxon Nuclear Company and in 1981 was promoted to his present position as Vice President of Exxon Enterprises.

Dr. Raymond is the author of several published technical papers.

JEROME G. RIVARD

JEROME G. RIVARD (Large image)

JEROME G. RIVARD

Chief Engineer, Electrical and Electronics Division, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, Michigan.

For his significant contributions to the development of control systems to advance space exploration and to improve automotive engine efficiency.

Born, Hudson, Wisconsin, November 21, 1932.

BS ME 1955, University of Wisconsin.

Mr. Rivard began his engineering career at the General Motors Technical Center in 1955. A year later he joined the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency at Huntsville, Alabama, where he was responsible for testing missile servo-control systems. After working as a Senior Project Engineer for Vickers Inc. to develop a hot gas missile control system and small rocket motors, he joined Bendix Research Laboratories as Manager of the Vehicle Controls Department. At Bendix he directed the development of control systems and techniques for dynamic control of automobiles, spacecraft, missiles, and naval vessels. Later as Group Director of Engineering he directed the development of the Electronic Fuel Injection System and got it into production. In 1976 he joined Ford Motor Company as Assistant Chief Engineer-Electronics. In 1978 he was promoted to his present position as Chief Engineer, Electrical and Electronics Division, where he is responsible for all vehicle electrical and electronics engineering for Ford Motor Company.

Mr. Rivard is the author of numerous technical articles. He is an active member of several professional engineering organizations and of community organizations such as the Boy Scouts.

GERARD A. ROHLICH

GERARD A. ROHLICH (Large image)

GERARD A. ROHLICH

C. W. Cook Professor of Environmental Engineering Professor, L. B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas Austin, Texas.

For his significant contributions to the solution of environmental problems and the education of engineers.

Born, Brooklyn, New York, July 8, 1910.

BS CE, 1934, Cooper Union, New York; BS CE 1936, MS CE 1937, PhD CE 1940, University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Rohlich began his professional career as an Assistant Professor at Pennsylvania State College in 1941. He served the War Department Office of the Chief of Engineers as Senior Sanitary Engineer in 1943 and then joined ESNA Corporation in 1944 as Chief Project Officer. He returned to Pennsylvania State College as an Associate Professor in 1945 before becoming a Civil Engineering faculty member at the University of Wisconsin in 1946. He served Wisconsin for 26 years before moving to his present position at the University of Texas in 1972.

Dr. Rohlich is a recognized expert on factors affecting eutrophication and measures for their control. Reports of his research have been used worldwide as source material. He was a member of the Governor's Water Resources Committee in Wisconsin, which drafted the State's Water Resources Act. More recently he has served as chairman of major committees of the National Academies of Science and of Engineering. Their reports on water quality criteria and safe drinking water will have long-lasting effects on the use of water and water pollution control as well as on the health of the country's population.

He has received numerous honors for his work, the latest being the Gordon Maskew Fair Medal from the Water Pollution Control Federation in 1980 for proficient accomplishment in the training and development of engineers. He is the author of more than 50 professional publications and has given innumerable invited lectures. He is also a member of several professional societies.

JAMES J. SCOTT

JAMES J. SCOTT (Large image)

JAMES J. SCOTT

President, Scott MTS Incorporated, Rolla, Missouri.

For his notable contributions to improved safety in the mining industry.

Born, Wiota, Wisconsin, April 22, 1928.

BS Mining Engineering, 1950, Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy; MS Mining Engineering, 1959, and PhD Mining Engineering, 1962, University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Scott joined the Bethlehem Steel Company as a mining engineer in 1950 and in 1957 enrolled in the University of Wisconsin for graduate study. He became a faculty member at the Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy in 1963. He was promoted to Professor in 1967 and became Chairman of the Department of Mining and Petroleum Engineering in 1969. He continued as a member of the regular faculty until 1976 and still serves as an adjunct Professor. He also served as Assistant Director-Mining of the U.S. Bureau of Mines and as a special assistant to the Director from 1970 to 1972 while on leave from the School. He became President of Scott MTS Inc, his present position, in 1976.

Dr. Scott developed and patented the friction rock stabilizer in 1972 and sold the marketing option to a research organization. In 1976 he became the corporation's exclusive sales agent for the stabilizer and formed the Scott Mine Technical Services Corporation (now Scott MTS Inc.) to market it. Over seven million were sold in the first three years. The friction rock stabilizer can be installed faster and provides better support and stabilization of the rock tunnels in underground mines than previous reinforcement methods. It has resulted in much greater safety for the miners and has helped make the mines more productive.

He is the author of more than 45 technical papers covering many aspects of mining. He has also been a consultant to more than 30 mining and mineral companies. Dr. Scott is a member of several professional societies including the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers and the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
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