1980 Award Recipients

Engineers' Day Information:
Diane Randall
608/265-4048
drandall@engr.wisc.edu

JAMES J. SKILES
Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
The 1980 Benjamin Smith Reynolds Award

ARTHUR S. LODGE
Professor, Engineering Mechanics and Chairman, Rheology Research Center
The 1980 Byron Bird Award

JOHN A. BEYER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RICHARD J. CAMPBELL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

BURLEIGH E. JACOBS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

LAWRENCE S. KRUEGER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

AKSEL L. LYDERSEN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

ROBERT F. MILLER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DONALD J. POVEJSIL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

DONALD F. ROOT
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JAMES J. SKILES

JAMES J. SKILES (Large image)

JAMES J. SKILES

James Skiles received the BS EE degree from Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1948; the MS EE from Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy in 1951; and the Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1954.

He joined the College of Engineering faculty as an instructor in 1951 and was appointed Wisconsin Electric Utilities Professor of Energy Engineering in 1975. He has served as Chairman of the Electrical Engineering Department for five years, as Director of the Madison campus University-Industry Research Program and since 1975, as Director of the College's Energy Research Center. For three years he was Supervisor of the Network Calculator Laboratory and provided important assistance to Wisconsin's electrical utility companies in planning for their future power systems. In addition, he has had a major role in creating the minicomputer laboratory in the College. This facility, which very few industries own, is illustrative of his efforts to keep the instruction of his students at the frontier of developments.

Because of his dedication to both industry and education, Professor Skiles has established close relationships with industry through his administrative assignments and thus has learned a great deal about industrial problems and needs. He has used this knowledge to make his instruction take on the character of engineering reality and pertinence rather than academic abstraction. Further, he has regularly brought other faculty members into contact with industry so that their students have also benefited. He understands the needs and motivations of his students and adapts his material to meet those needs. His enthusiasm for his work is reflected in his teaching and is contagious. Former students describe him as "the model of an outstanding university engineering professor" and report that "many of his students move quickly to positions of high responsibility and leadership upon graduation."

In 1955 shortly after he joined the faculty, he received the Kiekhofer Outstanding Teaching Award. He has continued to be an outstanding teacher and, at the same time, has given dedicated and extensive service to his university on committees and administrative assignments in so many areas that it is impossible to describe all of them here.

ARTHUR S. LODGE

ARTHUR S. LODGE (Large image)

ARTHUR S. LODGE

Professor Lodge received the BA degree in Mathematics in 1945 and both the MA and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Theoretical Physics in 1948 from Oxford University.

He has been a member of the University of Wisconsin—Madison College of Engineering faculty since he joined it as a Visiting Professor in 1965. Previously he had been a Nuffield Research Fellow at Oxford University, a Theoretical Physicist at the British Rayon Research Association and a Senior Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Manchester, England. Since 1948, he has written more than 50 publications. His book Elastic Liquids has received international acclaim. One colleague says, "This clearly written and well-organized research book, written over fifteen years ago at a time there were very few monographs in the field of Rheology, is a classic, largely cited by rheologists working in either fundamental or applied areas." It was the first text to describe the modern approach to rheology and, as a result, it has had a profound effect on the field. Professor Lodge's employment of experimental observations and unifying theory in a complementary fashion to make a coherent text is frequently praised. A colleague characterized his research publications as, "...a Lodge paper, always carefully crafted and full of insight, is an 'event'; his book Elastic Liquids is a landmark."

In 1971 The Society of Rheology, in presenting the Bingham Medal to Professor Lodge, described his book as "a lucid, scholarly and comprehensive treatment of modern rheology, both theoretical and experimental." The Institute for Scientific Information lists the book as one of the most cited items in its field.

In addition to being an excellent teacher, Professor Lodge has designed experimental instruments to test his and other theories. The "Stressmeter," which he invented to measure stresses in polymer fluids during processing, has been patented in two countries and patents are pending in others.

JOHN A. BEYER

JOHN A. BEYER (Large image)

JOHN A. BEYER

President, Transco Pacific Company and General Constructors, Bellevue, Washington.

For his management and engineering contributions to the construction of major transportation facilities.

Born, Horicon, Wisconsin, August 25, 1924.

BS CE 1950, University of Wisconsin.

Mr. Beyer began his professional career as party chief for a survey crew of Morrison Knudson Company. He served this company for over 20 years in various capacities, ultimately becoming Vice-President in charge of construction operations in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. During this period, he had overall management responsibility for numerous rail construction projects involving tunnels, trestles and the installation of 130 miles of continuous welded rail which required the design and patenting of special equipment for handling rail and ballast. He also had major engineering responsibilities for several dams, construction of major highways and excavation of a pit mine.

In 1971 Mr. Beyer joined General Construction Corporation as President. During the next eight years, he diversified the company's operation and increased its annual dollar volume of business more than tenfold. He was responsible for many major engineering projects, including construction of roads and operating centers for the development of the Alaskan Pipeline. One aspect of this project involved the design and construction of building modules up to five stories high that had to be built in Seattle, barged to Alaska, transported overland to the operational site and assembled with the other modules into a finished building.

In early 1980 he assumed his present positions as President of Transco Pacific Company and of General Constructors. He is also Vice-Chairman of the Careage Corporation. He serves on the board of directors of several industrial firms. He is also very active in community affairs and is a member of the Board of Regents of Seattle University.

RICHARD J. CAMPBELL

RICHARD J. CAMPBELL (Large image)

RICHARD J. CAMPBELL

President and Chief Operating Officer, The Trane Company, La Crosse, Wisconsin.

For his significant contributions to reducing costs and improving efficiency in the manufacture of air-conditioning equipment.

Born, Rochester, New York, December 21, 1929.

BS Welding Engineering 1955, Ohio State University.

In 1955 Mr. Campbell began his professional career doing welding research as a U.S. Air Force officer. Two years later he joined ACF Industries and in 1959, General Electric Company as a Welding Engineer. In 1961 he joined The Trane Company where he has been promoted to increasingly responsible positions, becoming President in 1977.

Mr. Campbell was The Trane Company's first welding engineer. Since he had no predecessor in many of the positions he held, he was responsible for developing methods and procedures to solve specific problems, rather than merely to continue routine operations. He established a technical group of 17 persons who handle the welding production and development of pressure vessels in 18 international plants. He changed the performance of welding processes from 5 percent automatic/semiautomatic and 95 percent manual to 65 percent automatic and 35 percent manual. He was also instrumental in establishing logical and reasonable qualification requirements for certification of welders. Among his numerous awards are: the James F. Lincoln Welding Award in both 1953 and 1961; designation as a Distinguished Alumnus by Ohio State University in 1973; and an invitation by the American Welding Society to give the silver anniversary Plummer Lecture.

He is an active member of several professional societies, as well as serving as Director of the Development Fund, UW-La Crosse, and as a member of the Board of Directors of Aquinas High School in La Crosse.

BURLEIGH E. JACOBS

BURLEIGH E. JACOBS (Large image)

BURLEIGH E. JACOBS

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Grede Foundries Inc., Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

For his important contributions in the metals casting industry and the development of new products to fulfill industrial requirements.

Born, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 3, 1920.

BA, 1942, University of Wisconsin.

Following service as a naval officer in World War II, Mr. Jacobs joined Grede Foundries Inc. in 1945 and has served the company continuously since that time. In 1973 he was elected to his present position as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. In 1947 he was appointed Works Manager of the Iron Mountain Foundry, to get this new facility into production. It now produces more than 30,000 tons of castings annually. He was responsible for introducing the production of ductile iron castings at the Reedsburg Division in 1951. At that time, it was the second independent producer of castings from this material which had not yet been commercially accepted. It now produces annually more than 50,000 tons. Under his management, the productive capacity of the firm has more than quadrupled in tonnage and dollar sales during the last ten years.

He has been active in professional societies, serving terms as President of the American Foundrymen's Society in 1972 and of the Cast Metals Federation in 1974. In addition, he was the only person to serve three times as President of the Steel Founders Society of America, which awarded him the Frederick A. Lorenz Memorial Medal in 1970 for outstanding service to the steel casting industry. He also received the Gold Medal awarded by the Gray and Ductile Iron Founders Society in 1973.

Mr. Jacobs serves on the board of directors of several industries and also on the Board of the National Association of Manufacturers. Active in civic affairs, he is a past president of the Milwaukee YMCA.

LAWRENCE S. KRUEGER

LAWRENCE S. KRUEGER (Large image)

LAWRENCE S. KRUEGER

President and Chairman of the Board, Pelton Casteel Inc., Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

For his important contributions to the design and operation of new and environmentally modernized foundry systems, which have markedly increased productivity.

Born Milwaukee, Wisconsin, January 13, 1924.

BS ME 1948; MS ME 1954, University of Wisconsin.

Mr. Krueger joined Pelton Casteel Inc. as Personnel Manager in 1948. Four years later he was promoted to Plant Manager. His responsibilities included planning, designing and supervising construction of plant additions and new facilities and modernizing mechanical systems for processing molds, cores and castings. He was promoted to Vice President and Works Manager in 1962 and to his present position as President and Chairman of the Board in 1970. Under his management, the company has continued to grow with the addition of a new finishing and heat treating plant and new molding machinery and furnaces so that annual production has almost doubled. The increased production from the modernization program has been achieved with reduced impact on the environment and notable improvements in employee working conditions. The company has become a major Midwest producer of steel castings under his guidance.

Active in professional organizations, Mr. Krueger is President of the United Foundrymen of Wisconsin, past president of the Steel Founders Society of America and a Director of the American Foundrymen's Association, as well as serving in other organizations. In 1978 he received the Lorenz Gold Medal from the Steel Founders Society of America.

He is a member of the board of directors of several corporations and active in civic affairs such as the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and the Milwaukee Boys' Club.

AKSEL L. LYDERSEN

AKSEL L. LYDERSEN (Large image)

AKSEL L. LYDERSEN

Professor, The Technical University of Norway, Trondheim, Norway.

For major contributions to research, design, construction and development of key industries in Norway and Iceland and to the improvement of chemical engineering education in Northern Europe.

Born, Flosta, Norway, February 22, 1919.

Ingeniør, 1943; Doctor Technicae, 1950, The Technical University of Norway.

Professor Lydersen began his career with Kvaermer Brug in Oslo developing a method for scientifically freezing fish filets. The data developed from this work has been published internationally. In 1949 he started his teaching career at The Technical University of Norway while completing the work for his doctoral degree. In 1952 he joined the staff of the University of Wisconsin, College of Engineering, as a Project Associate. Here, he taught and carried out research in thermodynamics until 1954, when he joined Miller Brewing Company to design the process and equipment for the purification of its carbon dioxide by-product. He returned to the faculty of The Technical University of Norway in 1955 as Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and was appointed as a full Professor in 1958. He was a Visiting Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, in 1970 and the University of Wisconsin—Madison in 1973.

Dr. Lydersen has developed new technology for key industries such as freezing of fish and other marine products, refining of marine oils and producing deuterium-rich water, which have made major contributions to the Norwegian economy. In each area he has provided highly reliable new physical data and developed new design procedures as well as designing and supervising construction of plants. He has also had a major share in modernizing and expanding chemical engineering education in Northern Europe as well as his own university. He is the author of more than 30 papers and two widely used textbooks. He has been invited to give guest lectures and present papers in more than ten countries and holds patents in at least three of them.

ROBERT F. MILLER

ROBERT F. MILLER (Large image)

ROBERT F. MILLER

Director of Reliability and Quality Control, Delco Electronics Division, General Motors Corporation, Kokomo, Indiana.

For his inventiveness in the application of properties of materials to significantly improve the efficiency and reliability of switching systems.

Born, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 30, 1925.

BS EE, 1947; MS EE, 1954; and PhD EE, 1957, University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Miller joined Delco in 1957 as a project engineer. Later he served as supervisor of advanced semiconductor development, assistant chief engineer and then manager of product assurance. He was promoted to his present position as Director of Quality Control in 1975. Dr. Miller's engineering analysis designs and contributions to corporate standards were instrumental in moving Delco Systems into solid-state technology. His work established a thick film hybrid and integrated circuit capability in the company. He has had major responsibilities in the development of an automotive voltage regulator, small-signal transistors, semiconductor fabrication processes and automotive radio receiver/tape combinations. He also established an engineering test group and devised design validation procedures. Under his leadership, Delco Electronic Systems has won a worldwide reputation for reliability.

Prior to joining Delco Electronics, Dr. Miller was an instructor at the Milwaukee School of Engineering and served as acting head of the Physics and Chemistry Department. He was also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin, College of Engineering.

Dr. Miller has served on the Radio Task Force of General Motors Corporation. He has authored or coauthored several papers on diffusion techniques, photovoltaic energy conversion, transistor theory, quality control systems and electronic test systems. He holds three patents in the field of instrumentation and control. He is also very active in civic affairs such as the Board of Directors of the YMCA and the Howard Community Hospital Foundation Board.

DONALD J. POVEJSIL

DONALD J. POVEJSIL (Large image)

DONALD J. POVEJSIL

Vice President, Corporate Planning Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

For his significant contributions to the generation, transmission and application of electrical energy in the United States.

Born, Shaker Heights, Ohio, February 23, 1927.

Bachelor of Naval Science, 1947; BS EE, 1948; MS EE, 1949, University of Wisconsin.

Mr. Povejsil joined the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in 1949 as engineer in Central Station Engineering where his work involved analysis of electric utility systems problems. After several promotions, he became Manager, Electric Utility Headquarters, in 1962, where he had primary responsibility for design and construction of the 500 K V Virginia Electric Power Project, the first U.S. installation to operate at this voltage, and the 750 K V Apple Grove Project. He also initiated the first long-range business and technology planning in Westinghouse. Four years later, he was promoted to General Manager, Nuclear Fuel Division, where he was responsible for all fuel-related activities of commercial nuclear power. Under his direction, the fabrication cost of nuclear fuel was reduced 50 percent through technology innovation in design and manufacturing. Later, as Vice President and General Manager, Large Steam Turbine Division, he supervised the design and start-up of the world's most highly automated facility for steam turbine blade manufacture. He was promoted to Vice President, Personnel and Administration, in 1973, where he supervised labor negotiations with four major unions and developed new programs for recruitment and training of minority and female engineers. He was promoted to his present position as Vice President, Corporate Planning, in 1976. Among his many responsibilities in this position are the development and implementation of major advances in corporate and business unit strategic planning.

Mr. Povejsil is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and an Association Fellow in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is the author of several published papers and a book in addition to numerous classified papers. He is also active in numerous community service groups.

DONALD F. ROOT

DONALD F. ROOT (Large image)

DONALD F. ROOT

Director of the Fiber Products Division, Research and Development, Weyerhaeuser Company, Tacoma, Washington.

For his notable contributions to the development of new products and increased productivity at less energy cost in the wood products industry.

Born, Janesville, Wisconsin, January 3, 1929.

BS ChE, 1953; MS ChE, 1954; PhD ChE, 1957, University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Root joined the Weyerhaeuser Company in 1956 as a research engineer in the Products and Processes Department and has served that company continuously in increasingly responsible positions. He was promoted to his present position as Director of the Fiber Products Division, Research and Development, in 1974. He has performed intensive research in bark chemicals and holds several patents in this field. He has also made comprehensive investigations into other wood chemicals such as xylitol, xylose and levulinic acid. He made important contributions to new developments in plastics, resins, polymers and adhesives, which provided needed new and improved products.

From 1971 to 1974 Dr. Root directed a program to seek out new business ideas for the company. The Weyerhaeuser Aquaculture and Nursery Stock Business are direct results. He also led research programs on improved resorcinol-type adhesives for construction and repellents for animal control in forest regeneration areas.

Presently he directs a staff of 190 scientists, engineers and technicians in the company's research and development efforts to meet the needs of all of its fiber business, as well as programs concerning energy, effluent control and long-range research.

He is Chairman of the Research Advisory Committee of the Institute of Paper Chemistry and active with many other agencies and professional societies. He is the author of more than fifteen papers. He is also active in community programs such as Junior Achievement and Boy Scouts of America.




Date last modified: 11-Dec-2013
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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