1976 Award Recipients

GENE M. AMDAHL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CLIFFORD ALLEN BETTS
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

WALTER L. DAHL
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

JEFF C. DIETZ
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RAYMOND GEORGE HERB
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

LAWRENCE H. HODGES
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

RICHARD W. HURN
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CHARLES S. McNEER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CHESTER W. SPENCER
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

D. GILMAN TAYLOR
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

CHARLES R. WILKE
Distinguished Service Award Recipient

GENE M. AMDAHL

GENE M. AMDAHL (Large image)

GENE M. AMDAHL

Chairman of the Board of Directors, Amdahl Corporation, Sunnyvale, California.

For his development of very large, very high speed digital computers.

Born, Flandreau, South Dakota, November 16, 1922.

B.S. (Engineering Physics) 1948, South Dakota State University.

Ph. D. (Physics) 1952, University of Wisconsin.

While working for his Ph.D. degree he collaborated with C. H. Davidson on the design of an innovative computer named the WISC. This computer in the Department of Electrical Engineering enabled the University of Wisconsin College of Engineering to get an early start in computer education and led directly to the present Engineering Computer Laboratory. After leaving the University he accepted a position as Project Engineer with IBM. He left IBM after three years to work for Ramo-Wooldridge on radar track following techniques for a short time and then joined Aeronutronics as Manager of Date Processing Engineering. He returned to IBM as Director of Computer Research in 1960 where he had primary responsibility for the IBM 360 and its later model, the IBM 370, which became the most widely used computers in the world. In 1970 he left IBM to form his own company and produced the Amdahl 470 which is now recognized as the world's fastest and most powerful computer.

He is a member of the American Physical Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (Fellow), and the National Academy of Engineering. He received a Distinguished Alumni Award from South Dakota State University in 1970. He is presently a Director of Compata, Inc., of Los Angeles and also a Counselor and Member of the Board of Directors of Fujitsu Ltd. of Tokyo, Japan.

CLIFFORD ALLEN BETTS

CLIFFORD ALLEN BETTS (Large image)

CLIFFORD ALLEN BETTS

Consultant, Denver, Colorado.

For his outstanding work in hydraulics and water resources.

Born, Norwalk, Connecticut, September 12, 1889.

Ph.B. Yale University.

Civil Engineer 1913, University of Wisconsin.

Early in his professional career he held engineering positions in Norwalk and Bridgeport, Connecticut. He left the East to take an engineering position for the City of Portland, Oregon, and then served for a short period as Chief Engineer of the Cummings-Moberly Lumber Company. In 1919 he joined the U. S. Forest Service in Denver, Colorado, as an engineer on the Fraser River, Williams Fork and Blue River projects and later as the Office Engineer for the Moffat Tunnel Commission. In 1928 he joined the Bureau of Reclamation for six years as engineer on the Owyhee Dam project. Subsequently he held various positions with the U. S. Forest Service in Washington. D. C. for more than 20 years. After leaving government service in 1954 he joined the engineering firm of Alvord, Burdick and Howson before becoming an independent consultant in 1956.

Memberships in technical and honorary societies include American Society of Civil Engineers (past President of the Washington, D. C., Section), Washington Society of Engineers (past President), Colorado Society of Engineers (past Director), D. C. Council of Engineering and Architects Association (past Chairman), and Washington Academy of Sciences. The American Society of Civil Engineers presented him with the Thomas Fitch Rowland Prize in 1932 for his work on the Moffat Tunnel and with the Civil Engineering History and Heritage Award in 1975. In 1954 and again in 1975 he received the Annual Award of the Washington Society of Engineers. In 1973 he became an Honorary member of Chi Epsilon at the University of Colorado and in 1966 he received the Wisconsin Alumni Association Spark Plug Award.

WALTER L. DAHL

WALTER L. DAHL (Large image)

WALTER L. DAHL

Chief, Weapons Technology Division of the Research Directorate, General Thomas J. Rodman Laboratory, Rock Island, Illinois.

For his many original contributions leading to improved national defense.

Born, Deforest, Wisconsin, April 17, 1923.

Certificate (ASTP) 1944, Clemson University.

B.S. (M.E.) 1962, M.S. (M.E.) 1970, University of Wisconsin.

From 1945 to 1950 he was the owner and product engineer of Firearms Unlimited in DeForest. He then joined the U.S. Army Ordnance Works in Baraboo as Chief of Ballistics for a five year period. This was followed by four years with the Army Ordnance Industrial Center in Manheim, Germany, consulting and advising 14 foreign governments and manufacturers in Europe and the Mid-East. He returned to Madison in 1959 as Chief Engineer for the Carlson Engineering Company while at the same time completing the requirements for his B.S. degree. After leaving Madison he worked with E.I. DuPont de Nemours Company for five years as a Senior Research Engineer and as a Research Associate. In 1967 he became associated with the U.S. Army Armament Command and Rock Island Arsenal Laboratories where he has held several positions. He served as Chief of the Division of Engineering Science and Technology for two years and in 1972 was designated Chief of the Major General Keith L. Ware Simulation Center. He was appointed to his present position in 1975, from which he retired in 1976.

He is a registered Professional Engineer in Iowa and Wisconsin. He has 13 patents in the U.S., 5 foreign countries and 63 Formal Invention Disclosures. He has written many papers and technical reports and is a member of several technical societies. He is a member of the U. S. Civil Service Commission Rating Panel for Engineers and Scientists. He has won awards from the U. S. Army Weapons Command, the E. I. DuPont Company and the Department of Defense. He presently serves as an advisor to the Department of Defense Manufacturing and Technology Advisory group.

JEFF C. DIETZ

JEFF C. DIETZ (Large image)

JEFF C. DIETZ

Senior Vice-President, Clark, Dietz and Associates-Engineers, Inc., Sanford, Florida.

For outstanding contributions in sanitary and hydraulic engineering.

Born, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, October 10, 1914.

B.S. (C.E.) 1939, M.S. (Sanitary Engineering) 1941.

Ph.D. (C.E.) 1947, all from the University of Wisconsin.

After graduation he served as an Instructor in Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering at the University of Wisconsin for three years. This was followed by a three year period of service with the U. S. Army after which he returned to the University of Wisconsin as a Research Associate while completing work for his Ph. D. degree. In 1947 he joined the University of Illinois as an Assistant Professor of Sanitary Engineering and remained with the university for ten years rising to the rank of Professor of Sanitary Engineering. He has been a partner in the Engineering firm of Clark, Daily and Dietz in Urbana, Illinois, since 1957. He was recently appointed to his present position.

He is a registered engineer in eight states and a member of many technical and honorary societies such as American Society of Civil Engineers (Fellow), American Public Health Association (Fellow), American Academy of Environmental Engineers (Diplomat), American Water Works Association, and American Public Works Association. He has published extensively in his field. In addition to his outstanding professional career he has had a distinguished military record. During World War II he was involved in the design and construction of military airfields in seven countries in Europe. As a result of his work he received the Criox De Guerre with Gold Star from France and the Bronze Star Medal from the U.S.A. He has been active in civic organizations such as the Parent Teachers Association, Urbana Chamber of Commerce and the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts of America.

RAYMOND GEORGE HERB

RAYMOND GEORGE HERB (Large image)

RAYMOND GEORGE HERB

Emeritus Professor of Physics - University of Wisconsin, President and Chairman of Board of National Electrostatics Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin.

For important contributions to the development of particle accelerators of vital importance to the utilization of nuclear energy.

Born, Navarino, Wisconsin, January 22, 1908.

B.S. (Physics) 1931 and Ph.D (Physics) 1935 from the University of Wisconsin.

Most of his professional life has been with the University of Wisconsin starting as a Research Associate in 1935 and progressing through the ranks to Professor of Physics in 1945. He was the Mendenhall Professor of Physics during the period 1961-72. Since retirement from the University he has been active with his company, the National Electrostatics Corporation, currently serving as President and Chairman of the Board. The company builds high voltage particle accelerators and high vacuum equipment. It is now building a 20 million volt accelerator for Japan and a 25 million volt accelerator for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The Oak Ridge machine will operate at nearly double the present world's highest operating voltage. He has written over forty technical papers covering a wide variety of topics in physics such as electrostatic accelerators, Getter-iron pumps, scattering of protons, orbitron vacuum pumps and many others. His contributions have been recognized by election to membership in the National Academy of Sciences and to the grade of Fellow in the American Physical Society.

He was awarded the Tom W. Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics in 1958. The award is given to recognize and encourage outstanding experimental research in nuclear physics. He was awarded honorary Ph.D. degrees from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil in 1955 and from Basel, Switzerland in 1960.

LAWRENCE H. HODGES

LAWRENCE H. HODGES (Large image)

LAWRENCE H. HODGES

Vice President, Technical Affairs, J. I. Case Company, Racine, Wisconsin.

For significant contributions to farm safety and the development of engineering standards for agricultural and industrial equipment.

Born, Tulia, Texas, July 1. 1920.

B.S. (Ag. E.) 1943, Texas A & M.

B.S. (M.E.) 1951, University of Wisconsin.

After serving six years as an Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering at the University of Wisconsin he joined the J. I. Case Company, Rockford plant, and remained there for seven years in various positions of increasing responsibility. He became associated with the Racine plant of the J. I. Case Company in 1959. He has served as Director of Engineering, Director of Product Planning and Programming, and Director of Operations Service. He was appointed Vice President, Research and Technical Services, in 1972, and recently to his present position.

During World War II he served as a Field Artillery Officer in the European Theater and remained active in the U. S. Army Reserve until his retirement in 1964 as a Lieutenant Colonel. He is an active member of many technical societies including the American Society of Agricultural Engineers, serving as President in 1973-74, Society of Automotive Engineers, American National Standards Institute, Farm and Industrial Equipment Institute, and the Construction Industry Manufacturers Association. He was honored as Engineer of the Year by the Wisconsin Section of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers in 1975. He is presently serving as Vice President for Farms on the National Safety Council. He is currently Chairman of the Agricultural Engineering Advisory Committee to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a member of a four-man team of U. S. experts assigned to harmonize agricultural tractor standards with the Soviet Union.

RICHARD W. HURN

RICHARD W. HURN (Large image)

RICHARD W. HURN

Research Supervisor, U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration, Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

For his many important contributions leading to more efficient use of fuels and to cleaner air.

Born, Hurnville, Texas, January 13, 1919.

B.S. 1940, Texas Tech University.

M.S. (M.E.) 1947, University of Wisconsin.

After receiving his B.S. degree he worked for the Humble Oil Company. His service with this company was interrupted by World War II when he served as torpedo and ordnance officer in the Pacific destroyer fleet. He was awarded a Bronze Star Medal and a Presidential Citation for his excellent performance. He retired from the U.S. Naval Reserve as a Lieutenant Commander. In 1948 he joined the U.S. Bureau of Mines (now the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration) and has remained with that organization to the present time. During his twenty eight years of service he has held various positions of increasing importance and was appointed to his present position in 1973.

Throughout his career he has been very active in research with more than 60 technical papers to his credit. He has investigated such topics as combustion characteristics of diesel fuels, properties of leaded and lead-free fuels, ignition of fuels, composition of automobile exhaust gases, and methods of reducing exhaust emissions.

He is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, Air Pollution Control Association, Coordinating Research Council, Inc., and the National Science Foundation Committee considering research applications relating to the national need. In 1968 he received the Gold Medal Award, the highest service award given by the Department of Interior, and a Special Achievement Award in 1976. He is presently serving as Chairman of the Fuels and Materials Panel of the U. S. Task Force for Motor Vehicle Goals beyond l980.

CHARLES S. McNEER

CHARLES S. McNEER (Large image)

CHARLES S. McNEER

President and Chief Executive Officer, Wisconsin Electric Power Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

For his many important contributions to the power industry, especially the needs of Wisconsin citizens and industry.

Born, Gilbert, West Virginia, April 8, 1926.

B.S. (E.E.) 1950, Northwestern University.

His professional life has been with the Wisconsin Electric Power Company, starting in 1950 as a Junior Engineer. He progressed through the ranks as Assistant Vice President, Vice President-Administration, Senior Vice President and Executive Vice President. He was elected to the Board of Directors in 1970 and to his present position in 1975. He is also the President, Chief Executive Officer and a Director of Wisconsin Electrics subsidiaries-Wisconsin Michigan Power, Wisconsin Natural Gas and Badger Service.

He is a member of the Executive Committee of the Mid-America Interpool Network that coordinates the planning and operations of the major transmission systems in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri and Upper Michigan and also of the Wisconsin-Upper Michigan Systems, a group of five utilities which coordinate the planning and operation of the bulk power systems in this area. He has served as Chairman of the Edison Electric Institute Committee on Interconnection Arrangements. He presently serves on the boards of directors of the Wisconsin Utilities Association, the Wisconsin Electric Utilities Research Foundation, the Metropolitan Milwaukee Association of Commerce, Goodwill Industries (Milwaukee area), Greater Milwaukee Committee and the Wisconsin State Council on Economic Education. In addition he serves on the Industry Advisory Committee to the Defense Electric Power Administration, Department of the Interior, The Federal Energy Administration Electric Utilities Advisory Committee, and the Edison Electric Institute Advisory Committee and Policy Committee on Nuclear Power.

CHESTER W. SPENCER

CHESTER W. SPENCER (Large image)

CHESTER W. SPENCER

Professor and Head, Department of Materials Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia.

For his many contributions to the development of Engineering Materials.

Born, Greeley, Kansas, November 2, 1924.

B.S. (Engineering) 1949 and M.S. (Engineering) 1950 University of Kansas.

Ph. D. (Metallurgy and Physics) 1952, University of Wisconsin.

After graduation he served for two years as a Senior Engineer for Sylvania Electric and then for two years as a Research Associate at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. He then accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering at Cornell University and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1958. He left Cornell University in 1962 to serve as Manager, Research and Advanced Development Division, Materials Department of AVCO. Two years later he joined the Chase Brass and Copper Company as Vice President, Special Metals, and as a Director of the Company. During the period 1973-76 he served as Executive Director of the National Materials Advisory Board, National Academy of Sciences. He has recently been appointed to his present position at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Institute of Chemists, American Society for Metals, American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers and other professional societies. He is the author of numerous technical publications. He has had major responsibility for the development of the Apollo Command Module heat shield, critical materials components for advanced military reentry systems, improved medical X-ray equipment, and an advanced process for producing large zirconium alloy tubing used in nuclear reactors. He served in Europe during World War II and was awarded the Bronze Star Medal.

D. GILMAN TAYLOR

D. GILMAN TAYLOR (Large image)

D. GILMAN TAYLOR

Consultant, Honeywell, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota.

For his inventions of many electromechanical control devices for the home, industry and space exploration.

Born, Madison, Wisconsin, March 8, 1902.

B.S. (M.E.) 1928, University of Wisconsin.

Except for a brief period immediately after graduation with the Underwriters Laboratories in Chicago, his entire professional career has been with Honeywell, Inc. He started as a Design Engineer and has held positions of Corporate Staff Engineer, Section Chief Aeronautical Division, Chief Engineer Aeronautical Division, and Consultant. Since his retirement in 1989 he has been actively involved with the solution of technical problems originating in any of the Company's two dozen engineering departments.

He holds 65 U. S. patents in the fields of temperature control, relay circuitry for the automatic control of oil and gas burners, instruments and controls for automatic flight control, air conditioning and industrial instrumentation. He initiated the study that resulted in the gyroscope that has guided more than 95 percent of the orbital flights (and all of the moon flights) of the U. S. astronauts. He was the recipient of the Harold Sewatt Award "in recognition of outstanding ability and contribution to a technical accomplishment of unusual significance for Honeywell and the engineering and scientific professions." He is a registered Professional Engineer in Minnesota and has been active in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Society of Automotive Engineers, American Society for Heating and Ventilating Engineers, and is a life member of the Engineers Club of Minnesota.

CHARLES R. WILKE

CHARLES R. WILKE (Large image)

CHARLES R. WILKE

Professor, University of California, Berkeley, California.

For outstanding research, teaching, and administration in Chemical Engineering.

Born, Dayton, Ohio, February 4, 1917.

B.S. (Ch.E.) 1940, University of Dayton.

MS. (Physical Chemistry) 1942, State College of Washington.

Ph.D. (Ch.E.)1944, University of Wisconsin.

After graduation he served for a short time as a chemical engineer for the Union Oil Company of California and then as an instructor in Chemical Engineering at the State College of Washington. He joined the faculty at the University of California-Berkeley as an instructor in 1946 and progressed through the ranks to Professor in 1953. He served as Chairman of the Division of Chemical Engineering from 1953-1956 and Chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering from 1956-1963. He has been very active in research and has published over 80 papers. He also holds patents in the United States and in foreign countries.

He has devoted much time and effort to professional societies such as the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (Director and Fellow), American Institute of Chemists (Fellow), American Chemical Society, and American Society for Microbiology. He is a registered Chemical and Mechanical Engineer in California and served for eight years as a member of the California State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers, two years as President. In 1951 he was given the Alan P. Colburn Award and in 1965 the William H. Walker Award by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1975. He has been an invited participant at many international meetings in England, Japan, Australia, Finland, Mexico and Guatemala. He is currently a member of the Committee on Public Engineering Policy of the National Research Council.




Date last modified: 18-Sep-2014
Date created: 12-Sep-2007 00:30:00
Content by: alumni@engr.wisc.edu
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