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WISCONSIN STRUCTURES & MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY (WSMTL)

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Research Projects

Innovative Bridge Design and Construction IV
Bridge B-13-570 over IH39-90 with Wisconsin Precast "W" Girders Utilizing Steel-free Decks

Research by
Han-Ug Bae/ Prof. Michael Oliva,
Prof. Lawrence Bank & Prof. Jeff Russell
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

The University of Wisconsin will develop and assist in the design of a modified concrete deck and girder system for a major bridge structure. This new technology includes a steel-free deck system. The corrosion of steel reinforcement in conventional deck systems is the main cause of deterioration of deck slabs. Initial construction cost is lower without steel reinforcement and life cycle cost is reduced because of replacement of deteriorated deck is not required. This project is part of a bridge replacement and widening project on Dane County Highway BB over Interstate Highway 39/90 in Madison, WI.

An Embedded Sensing System for Paperboard Tubes
Research by
Huldah Gronvall/ Prof. Lawrence Bank
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Over the past few decades, due to increased speeds and capacities of manufacturing equipment, there has been a steady increase in the performance requirements for spirally-wound paperboard tubes (also known as "cores") on which paper, film, metals, and textiles are wound.

Rutting and Fatigue Specifications for Asphalt Binders
(Sponsored by Wisconsin Highway Research Program)

Researcher by
Rodrigo Delgadillo, Kitae Nam/ Prof. Hussain Bahia
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Two of the main distresses of asphalt pavements are rutting and fatigue. Rutting is characterized by permanent deformation of the pavement. It generally develops during the hot seasons, when the asphalt is softer. It can be identified by ruts on the wheel path. Fatigue is characterized by longitudinal cracks on the wheel path in the first stage, and by alligator cracking in an advanced damage stage.

Effectiveness and Life Performance of Concrete Bridge Deck and Crack Sealers
Research by
Melissa Dorshorst / Prof. Jose Pincheira
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

The primary objective of this project was to complete a systematic assessment of concrete bridge deck and crack sealers based on their effectiveness and life performance. Deck sealers are commonly applied during the final stages of construction to protect the deck against chloride ion intrusion. Crack sealers are used to penetrate, fill, and bond existing cracks back together. While both types of products are commonly used by Departments of Transportation around the country, little is known about the effectiveness of the products over time.

Failure Prediction of Gypsum Board Exposed to Elevated Temperatures
Research by
Gumpon Sriprutkiat & Onesty Friday/
Prof. Steve Cramer
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Gypsum board, commonly known as drywall, is normally used in buildings. It not only gives a nice finish, but is also a fire barrier. In case of fire, it would provide time for people to escape and for fire fighter to put out the fire.

Innovative Bridge Design and Construction III
Bridge B-13-161 on I-90 With Full Depth Precast Deck Panels

Research by
F. Greg Ehmke, Scott Markowski/
Prof. Lawrence Bank, Prof. Michael Oliva
& Prof. Jeff Russell
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering


In this research project the use of full-depth precast concrete deck panels for rapid bridge deck installation was investigated. In the course of the research laboratory tests were conducted in the Wisconsin Structures and Materials Testing Lab (WSMTL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) and plans and specifications were developed for implementing the system on a bridge on I-90 over Door Creek near Janesville, Dane County, Wisconsin.

Experimental and Analytical Optimization of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Grid-Reinforced Concrete Bridge Decking
Research by
Tom Ringelstetter/
Prof. Lawrence Bank, Prof. Michael Oliva
& Prof. Jeff Russell
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

The purpose of this research is to investigate the optimization of three-dimensional fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing grids and integrated stay-in-place (SIP) formwork for reinforcing and forming highway bridge decks.

Using the Gyratory Compactor to Measure the Mechanical Stability of Asphalt Mixtures
Research by
Ahmed Fatin Faheem Mahmoud/ Prof. Hussain Bahia
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

In this study several asphalt mixtures were produced using four different sources, different asphalt contents, and different gradations. Every mixture was compacted using the SGC.

Earlywood and Latewood Longitudinal Shrinkage in Loblolly Pine
Research by
Seth Pfeil, Chad Mertz/Prof. Steve Cramer
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering
Prof. Rod Lakes
Dept of Engineering Mechanics
Dave Kretschmann
Forest Products Laboratory

Wood tends to shrink in all directions as it dries. Ideally, this shrinkage would be uniform throughout a structural member such that it could be accurately predicted. In reality, warping caused by differential shrinkages is a common occurrence in wood members. The variation of shrinkage properties throughout the cross section of a tree may account for these warp-causing differentials.

Use of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Reinforcement Cage in Concrete Bridge Decking
Research by
David A. Jacobson, Jr. & Mack Conachen/
Prof. Lawrence Bank, Prof. Michael Oliva
& Prof. Jeff Russell
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

The deteriorating condition of bridges and other infrastructure facilities is recognized by highway agencies as one of the most complex problems in transportation infrastructure. As a result, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation is seeking innovative and cost-effective technologies to retrofit and rehabilitate many of the State's bridges.

Evaluation of the Roles of Adhesion & Cohesion Properties of Asphalt Binders in Moisture Damage of Hot Mix Asphalt
Research by
Kunnawee Kanitpong/Prof. Hussain Bahia
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Resistance of asphalt mixtures to moisture damage is commonly known as a function of interaction between asphalt and aggregate as they are exposed to water. For many years, a number of research focused on moisture damage have listed a number of important factors. The mineralogical composition of aggregate and asphalt chemistry is well known as an important factor in the susceptibility of asphalt mixtures to moisture damage.

Innovative Bridge Design and Construction I
Bridge B-20-133 on US-151 With Fiber Reinforced Polymer Reinforced Concrete Deck

Research by
Dave Dieter, Adam Berg/
Prof. Lawrence Bank, Prof. Michael Oliva
& Prof. Jeff Russell
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

In this research project the use of a new combination of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite materials to reinforce bridge decks was investigated. In the course of the research laboratory tests were conducted in the Wisconsin Structures and Materials Testing Lab (WSMTL) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW) and a new bridge was constructed on US Highway 151 near the city of Waupun, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin utilizing the innovative FRP reinforcing system.


Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS)
Research by
Irene LaBarca, Ryan Foley, Nick Mason & Chad Sippel/
Prof. Steve Cramer
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS) is a recyclable material created when the molten slag from melted iron ore is quenched rapidly and then ground into a powder. This material has cemetitious properties and has been used as a replacement for cement for over 100 years. Recently, Wisconsin has begun using it in some of its highway projects.

Critical Evaluation of Using the SUPERPAVE Volumetric Mixture Design Procedure for Modified Binders
Research by
Dong-Woo Cho/ Prof. Hussain Bahia
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Asphalt concrete is the composite material composed of aggregate and asphalt binder to pave driving ways. It also can be categorized as flexible pavement due to asphalt binder. Most roads have been paved with asphalt concrete because asphalt concrete provides smooth driving, easy construction and maintenance, and 100% recycling.

Conceptual Studies for Rapidly Deployable Battlespace Gap Structures
Research by
Joseph P. Hanus/ Prof. Lawrence Bank
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

The US Army identified a gap defeat requirement for the US Army Future Combat System (FCS). The estimated 30-ton vehicle must be able to defeat (cross in same manner) gaps up to 4-meters wide within 3 minutes for assured mobility on the battlefield.


News

Nondestructive Testing of Steel Bridge Members Using the Time of Flight Diffraction Method
Research by Prof. Jose Pincheira
Dept of Civil & Environmental Engineering

There are many steel bridges in the U.S. that have low fatigue resistant details. Fatigue cracks that go undetected can lead to larger cracks and in some cases cause structural failure. Typically, inspectors will conduct a visual inspection to determine if a structure is experiencing detrimental cracking.

 

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Wisconsin Structures & Materials Testing Laboratory
University of Wisconsin-Madison
1415 Engineering Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1691

Tel: 608/265-8214
Fax: 608/265-8213
E-mail: wsmtl@engr.wisc.edu

© 2004 University of Wisconsin-Madison, College of Engineering/WSMTL