University of Wisconsin Madison College of Engineering

Founders' Lectures

 

Past lectures

 2010-2011    Michael L. Shuler
 2008-2009    Rakesh Agrawal
 2005-2006    Ka M. Ng
 2003-2004    Robert S. Langer
 2001-2002    Vern W. Weekman, Jr.
 1999-2000    W. Henry Weinberg
 1998-1999    Joseph A. Miller, Jr.,
 1997-1998    Robert A. Brown
 1996-1997    Mary L. Good
 1995-1996    Kathleen C. Taylor
 1994-1995    J. Howard Purnell
 1993-1994    Roger W.H. Sargent
 1992-1993    Mark S. Wrighton
 1991-1992    Arnold F. Stancell
 1990-1991    Sheldon A. Buckler
 1989-1990    Stuart E. Builder
 1988-1989    Neal R. Amundson
 1987-1988    Alexander MacLachlan

 

The Founders’ Lectureship was established in 1986 to bring distinguished speakers to the UW Department of Chemical Engineering to broaden our perspective and suggest new opportunities and areas of responsibility in the profession. Continuing traditions dating from the founding of the department in 1905, such assessment and evaluation helps to keep our curriculum and research programs vigorous and responsive to a changing world. The Marshall Fund supports this annual lectureship in honor of the founders of the department.

 

George Georgiou

George Georgiou, PhD

Departments of Chemical Engineering,
Biomedical Engineering, and
Molecular Genetics and Biology
University of Texas, Austin

Biography and abstract »
 

Founders' Lecture, 2012-2013

WHAT'S IN YOUR BLOOD:
Systems Analysis on Human Antibody Immunity
 
Monday, September 10, 2012, at 4:00 p.m., refreshments at 3:30 p.m.
Lobby of Engineering Hall

 

W. Robert Marshall, 1916–1988

 

W. Robert Marshall

W. Robert Marshall view larger image

 

Bob Marshall’s career spanned more than 40 years of outstanding service to the University of Wisconsin and to the national and international community of scholars.

 

W. Robert Marshall received his B.S. from Illinois Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 1941, studying under Olaf A. Hougen. After six years at DuPont he returned to UW as associate professor of chemical engineering, where his research focussed on atomization and spray drying.

 

In 1953 Bob was named director of the Engineering Experiment Station, and in 1971 was appointed dean of the College of Engineering. As dean, he led the college in strengthening its international ties and developed programs to help women and minorities enter the field of engineering. In 1981 he became director of University Industry Research, a program dedicated to the encouragement of cooperative efforts between the university and industry.

 

Bob’s service to the profession was further demonstrated through his commitment to the American Institute of Chemical Engineers as a director and later as its president. He believed in the value of the exchange of information and the cross-fertilization of ideas that professional societies can provide.

 

But most of all, Bob Marshall was mentor, advisor and friend to the many who knew him.