University of Wisconsin Madison College of Engineering

Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series

The Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series consists of presentations on current research topics of interest to biomedical engineering graduate students and faculty by on-campus and visiting engineers and scientists.


A video archive of all seminars is available online.


Biomedical Engineering Fall 2013 Seminar Program

 

Date

Topic

Speaker

Monday
9/16/2013

Biomaterial platforms to explore cancer and
stem cell engineering
(Abstract)

Brendan Harley, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Monday
9/23/2013

Thrombospondins and Ocular Vascular Homeostasis
(Abstract)

Nader Sheibani, Ph.D.
Associate Professor RRF/
Alice R. McPherson Chair
Dept. of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, UW-Madison

Monday
9/30/2013

Value added: Biomechanical simulation advances understanding of upper limb function
(Abstract)

Wendy Murray, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Northwestern Universtiy

Monday
10/7/2013

Design and Evaluation of Biomaterials for Engineering Vascularized Tissues
(Abstract)

Eric Brey, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Illinois Institute of Technology

Monday
10/21/2013

Tumor ablation at the University of Wisconsin-A minimally invasive paradigm for the treatment of cancer
(Abstract)

Fred T. Lee Jr, M.D.
Professor
Dept. of Radiology
UW School of Medicine and Public Health

Thursday
10/24/2013
4:00 pm

Speech Responses in the Auditory Midbrain: A Novel Hypothesis for Vowel Coding
(Abstract)
Women in Science & Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI) Seminar
Note change of location and time:
140 Bardeen (4pm)

Laurel Carney, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Dept. of Neurobiology & Anatomy
University of Rochester

Monday
10/28/2013

Translating High-Resolution Label-Free Optical Imaging Technologies into Medical and Surgical Applications
(Abstract)

Stephen Boppart, M.D., Ph.D.
Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering
Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Tuesday
11/12/2013
3:00pm

Imaging the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Insulin Secretion
(Abstract)
Note change of day and time
Cosponsored by LOCI and Prairie Technologies

David Piston, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics
Vanderbilt University

Monday
11/18/2013

Top-down modulation of auditory processing in the mouse midbrain and thalamus
(Abstract)
Cosponsored by LOCI and Prairie Technologies

Daniel A. Llano, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor in Molecular and Integrative Physiology and the College of Medicine
Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Monday
11/25/2013

Regenerative biomaterials: clinical impact today and ideas for tomorrow
(Abstract)
Note change of location:
Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery (WID)Forum,
330 N. Orchard Street
Cosponsored by the Lectures Committee and WID

Jennifer Elisseeff, Ph.D.
Jules Stein Professor
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Johns Hopkins University

Monday
12/2/2013

Quantitative Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy
(Abstract)
Cosponsored by LOCI and Prairie Technologies

Kimani C. Toussaint, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Mechanical Science and Engineering
Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

 

 

Abstract, 9/16/13
Biomaterial platforms to explore cancer and stem cell engineering

Brendan Harley, Ph.D.

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex organization of structural proteins such as collagens and proteoglycans. Heterogeneous tissues with spatially and temporally modulated properties and their biomaterial mimics play an important role in organism physiology and regenerative medicine. With the understanding that the microstructure, mechanics, and composition of the ECM is dynamic and often spatially patterned or heterogeneous over the length-scale of traditional biomaterials, there has recently been significant effort aimed at moving away from static, monolithic biomaterials towards instructive biomaterials that provide specialized cell behavioral cues in spatially and temporally defined manners. I will describe the development of instructive biomaterial systems to explore the practical significance of how cell/matrix cues can be optimized to improve regenerative potential and the mechanistic details of how individual (stem) cells sense, integrate, and respond to multiple microenvironmental signals. We are using these approaches to design biomaterial platforms to investigate fundamental questions regarding niche-mediated regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) behavior, to explore synergistic action between local biophysical/biochemical properties for orthopedic interface repair, and to examine the impact of microenvironmental signals on glioma malignancy and therapy.

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Abstract, 9/23/13
Thrombospondins and Ocular Vascular Homeostasis

Nader Sheibani, Ph.D.

We are interested in how angiogenesis is normally regulated, and how alterations in these regulatory mechanisms lead to neovascularization associated with various pathologies. We use wild type and various trangenic mice in relevant models of ocular neovascularization. In addition, we have developed a novel method for culturing various vascular cell types from wild type and transgenic mouse retina. These cells allow us to examine cell autonomous regulatory mechanisms involved in regulation of vascular development and neovascularization. These in vivo and in vitro models are also utilized for drug screening and development of new therapeutics for various ocular diseases with a neovascular component.

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Abstract, 9/30/2013
Value added: Biomechanical simulation advances understanding of upper limb function

Wendy Murray, Ph.D.

The aim of my research is to use biomechanics as a framework for investigating how we move and control our arms and hands. In my lab, biomechanical modeling and simulation serve as methodological tools that advance the types of questions we can ask about upper limb function. In this talk, I will highlight examples in which biomechanical simulation added important insights that would have been difficult (or impossible) to derive from experiments. In doing so, I will illustrate significant contributions computer simulations methods have made to our understanding of the musculoskeletal design and function of the human upper limb at the basic, translational, and clinical levels.

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Abstract, 10/7/13
Design and Evaluation of Biomaterials for Engineering Vascularized Tissues

Eric Brey, Ph.D.

Vascularization is critical for engineering tissues of clinical size. Successful vascularization requires the design, optimization and evaluation of the physical and chemical properties of biomaterials used as tissue engineering scaffolds. In this presentation, biomaterial techniques developed to vascularize tissues of clinically relevant size and structure will be described. In addition, the application of X-ray phase contrast for the evaluation of engineered tissues will be presented.

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Abstract, 10/21/13
Tumor ablation at the University of Wisconsin-A minimally invasive paradigm for the treatment of cancer

Fred T. Lee Jr, M.D.

Image-guided minimally invasive tumor ablation is increasingly being used to treat tumors in the liver, lung, kidneys, and bone. However, the technology of tumor ablation remains in its infancy, often lagging behind the progress made in other cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and advanced surgical techniques. The multidisciplinary UW Tumor Ablation Laboratory has contributed several new technologies that are currently in clinical use. This seminar will discuss the history of tumor ablation, clinical uses of the different devices, and current areas of research.

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Abstract, 10/24/13
Speech Responses in the Auditory Midbrain: A Novel Hypothesis for Vowel Coding

Laurel Carney, Ph.D.

We combine neurophysiological, behavioral, and computational modeling techniques towards our goal of understanding neural mechanisms underlying the perception of complex sounds. Most of our work is focused on hearing in listeners with normal hearing ability. We are also interested in applying the results from our laboratory to the design of physiologically based signal-processing strategies to aid listeners with hearing loss.

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Abstract, 10/28/13 Translating High-Resolution Label-Free Optical Imaging Technologies into Medical and Surgical Applications
Stephen Boppart, M.D., Ph.D.

Historically, histopathological observations of fixed and stained tissue sections made using bright-field light microscopes in the pathology Dept. have represented the gold-standard for diagnosing most diseases. Essential for diagnosis is the ability to visualize the microscopic cellular and tissue architecture, as well as potential molecular alterations using special immunohistochemical stains. New high-resolution optical imaging technologies capable of providing microscopic structural, molecular, or functional information about tissue, in real-time, and at the point-of-care, would provide innumerable benefits for disease screening, early detection, and more rapid diagnosis across a wide range of medical and surgical specialties. Recent advances in label-free optical imaging technologies now make it possible to provide these capabilities and information, and importantly, do so without the use of exogenous contrast agents that can often limit translation because of regulatory hurdles. This seminar will present several examples of label-free optical biomedical imaging technologies including optical coherence tomography, multi-photon microscopy, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy, all of which are at varying stages of clinical translation into human studies and commercial development. Current challenges in optical source development, system engineering, and clinical adoption will also be discussed.

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Abstract, 11/12/13 (Note, date is a Tuesday)
Imaging the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Insulin Secretion

David Piston, Ph.D.

It has long been known that only a small fraction (<10‰) of the insulin in pancreatic beta-cells can be released. Clinical treatments of type 2 diabetes focus on increasing insulin release, so an understanding of insulin vesicle trafficking and release may lead to novel therapeutic strategies. Towards this understanding, we have developed novel quantitative imaging assays, based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), a technique widely used to study biomolecular dynamics and protein interactions in live cells. Limitations due to brightness differences, donor:acceptor stoichiometry, and cross-talk between the donor and acceptor can lead to misleading or even meaningless results. I will present two methods that we have developed to help alleviate these problems with cellular FRET measurements. The first approach for absolute and high precision measurements of FRET efficiency is based upon the use of an optical switching acceptor. By employing a defined train of optical perturbations to control the on and off states of the acceptor, it is possible to modulate the fluorescence intensity of the donor, and this can be analyzed using a lock-in detection approach. The second approach is to use spectral imaging with a newly developed snapshot hyperspectral imager - Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS). The IMS allows the whole X, Y, Z datacube to be captured in a single snapshot, and optical throughput is maximized.
Cosponsored by LOCI and Prairie Technologies

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Abstract, 11/18/13
Top-down modulation of auditory processing in the mouse midbrain and thalamus

Daniel A. Llano, Ph.D.

The neural mechanisms responsible for using high-level contextual cues to shape lower-level sensory processing are not yet known. An ideal substrate for this type of processing is the massive top-down projection system emanating from virtually every level of the auditory system. Our laboratory uses a range of optical, physiological, computational and anatomical techniques to study top-down projections from the cortex to two major subcortical regions: the auditory thalamus and the inferior colliculus. Using these approaches, we have found that the auditory corticocollicular projection system consists of at least two different subsystems, one emanating from cortical layer 5 and another emanating from layer 6, and that these projection systems have different physiological and anatomical features. We have also assessed cortical influences on the thalamus by way of studying the influence of the thalamic reticular nucleus on colliculo-thalamocortical transmission. To do this, we have developed a computational model of this system and used flavoprotein autofluoresence imaging to develop and study a novel mouse brain slice preparation containing intact projections from the inferior colliculus to the thalamus and from thalamus to cortex. Both in the model and in the brain slice preparation, we have observed that the thalamic reticular nucleus, under certain conditions, causes paradoxical enhancement in thalamocortical transmission. These data point to the wealth of previously uncharacterized complexity found in the descending systems that shape responses to real-world sounds.
Cosponsored by LOCI and Prairie Technologies

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Abstract, 11/25/13
Regenerative biomaterials: clinical impact today and ideas for tomorrow
Jennifer Elisseeff, Ph.D.

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Abstract, 12/2/2013
Quantitative Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy

Kimani C. Toussaint, Ph.D.

Advances in nonlinear microscopy, e.g., multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, have permitted both noninvasive and high-resolution imaging of biological specimens. In recent years, there has been increasing effort to use these techniques to perform quantitative inspection of specimens under study. This talk will focus on two particular techniques: Fourier transform-second-harmonic generation (FT-SHG) and polarization-second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) and their potential biomedical applications.
Cosponsored by LOCI and Prairie Technologies

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