University of Wisconsin Madison College of Engineering

Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series

The Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series consists of presentations on current research topics of interest to biomedical engineering graduate students and faculty by on-campus and visiting engineers and scientists.


Seminars are on Mondays at noon in the Tong Auditorium (Room 1003 Engineering Centers Building, 1550 Engineering Drive) unless otherwise indicated.


Biomedical Engineering Fall 2014 Seminar Program

 

Date

Topic

Speaker

Monday
9/8/2014

Biomimetic nanofibrous structures direct stem cell differentiation for connective tissue generation
(Abstract)

Wan-Ju Li, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Depts. of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Biomedical Engineering
UW-Madison

Monday
9/15/2014

The importance of intellectual property: a patent primer and overview of WARF
(Abstract)

Brian Frushour, MS
Intellectual Property Associate
Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation

Monday
9/29/2014

The "unified airway disease": asthma and obstructive sleep apnea—an evolving translational journey.
(Abstract)

Mihaela Teodorescu, MD
Associate Professor
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care
UW School of Medicine and Public Health

Monday
10/6/2014

Seeds, soils, stem cells, and cancer
(Abstract)

Shelly Peyton, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Chemical Engineering
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Monday
10/13/2014

Bioreactor-based and encapsulated mesenchymal stem cell therapy for protection and repair of injured vital organs and tissues
(Abstract)

Martin L. Yarmush, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor
Depts. of Biomedical & Chemical Engineering
Rutgers University
Center for Engineering in Medicine, MGH/Harvard Medical School

Monday
10/20/2014

Central nervous system stereotactic radiosurgery: technological development opportunities
(Abstract)

Edward T. Bender, PhD, DABR
Assistant Professor
Dept of Human Oncology
UW-Madison,
School of Medicine and Public Health

Monday
10/27/2014

Supramolecular peptide immunomodulators
(Abstract)

Joel Collier, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Dept. of Surgery - Committee on Molecular Medicine, Committee on Immunology
University of Chicago

Monday
11/3/2014

Bioactive materials for transitioning macrophage and fibroblast phenotypes within chronic vocal fold scar
(Abstract)

Susan Thibeault, PhD, CCC-SLP
Professor
Division of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery
UW School of Medicine and Public Health

Monday
11/17/2014

Modeling liver disease and development with human iPSCs
(Abstract)

Stephen A. Duncan DPhil Prof. and Vice-Chairman
Dept. of Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy
Medical College of Wisconsin

Monday
12/1/2014

Listening to small molecule cellular signaling with micrometabolomics
(Abstract)

Ashleigh Theberge, Ph.D.
Post-doctoral associate
Microtechnology Medicine Biology Lab
UW-Madison

 

 

Abstract, 9/18/2014
Biomimetic nanofibrous structures direct stem cell differentiation for connective tissue generation

Wan-Ju Li, Ph.D.

Connective tissues, such tendon and intervertebral disc, have tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) structures that are known to play a crucial role in determining their mechanical properties. Recently, it has been reported that ECM structure is able to direct lineage-specific differentiation of stem cells. My research aims to generate functional musculoskeletal tissues using stem cells for orthopedic applications. In this talk, I would like to present our recent findings in 1) using nanofiber technology to fabricate novel engineered nanofibrous matrix to mimic the ECM structures of tendon and intervertebral disc as well as 2) demonstrating how the unique biomimetic structures direct stem cells to differentiate into cell-specific lineages.

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Abstract, 9/15/2014
The importance of intellectual property: a patent primer and overview of WARF

Brian Frushour, MS

Intellectual property (IP) and technology transfer are key drivers of innovation in both industry and academia. The different forms of IP rights will be discussed, with a particular focus on patents. An overview of WARF's role in technology transfer at UW-Madison will also be covered, including its history and the disclosure process.

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Abstract, 9/29/2014
The "unified airway disease": asthma and obstructive sleep apnea-an evolving translational journey.

Mihaela Teodorescu, MD

Accumulating literature supports a bidirectional relationship of asthma with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA): OSA is more common in asthma where in turn worsens outcomes. This talk will review the clinical data supporting this reciprocal interaction and expand into its mechanistic underpinnings emerging from recent animal studies. Further research directions will also be outlined.

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Abstract, 10/6/2014
Seeds, soils, stem cells, and cancer

Shelly Peyton, Ph.D.

Metastasis is the leading cause of fatality for women diagnosed with breast cancer. The most common anatomical sites of distant tumor growth include the brain, lung, liver, and bone, and it is well known that metastatic spread in breast cancer is not random. Rather, different clinical subtypes of breast cancer exhibit unique patterns of metastatic site preference, called tissue tropism. I will talk about my lab's hypothesis that there is a relationship between the biophysical and biochemical properties of the tissue, and the ability of cells within a particular subtype of breast cancer to adhere, migrate, grow, and respond to chemotherapeutics at these secondary sites. I propose that the types of biomaterial environments my lab creates to study these phenomena can be used to predict tissue-specific spread, and may serve as a system that pharmaceutical companies can use for future drug discovery.

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Abstract, 10/13/2014
Bioreactor-based and encapsulated mesenchymal stem cell therapy for protection and repair of injured vital organs and tissues

Martin L. Yarmush, M.D., Ph.D.

Recently there has been a paradigm shift in what is considered to be the therapeutic promise of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in diseases of vital organs. Originally, research focused on MSCs as a source of regenerative cells through the differentiation of transplanted cells into lost cell types. It is now clear, however, that trophic modulation of inflammation, cell death, fibrosis, and tissue repair are primary mechanisms of MSC therapy. This has been clarified in studies where delivery of growth factors, cytokines, and other signaling molecules secreted by MSCs is often sufficient to obtain the therapeutic effects. In this presentation, we provide several examples of MSC therapy in disease models of vital organs using models of acute liver failure, acute kidney failure, and spinal cord injury. Some critical gaps in our knowledge hampering experimental progress and clinical implementation will be discussed.

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Abstract, 10/20/2014
Central nervous system stereotactic radiosurgery: technological development opportunities

Edward T. Bender, PhD, DABR

Stereotactic radiosurgery is a non-invasive alternative to surgery for some patients with cancerous and non-cancerous diseases of the central nervous system. Many of the core technologies used for this treatment technique have not changed substantially over the last 45 years. This talk will explore current and future opportunities for radiosurgery technology development, and highlight some of the unique resources UW-Madison has to offer in this endeavor.

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Abstract, 10/27/2014
Supramolecular peptide immunomodulators

Joel Collier, Ph.D.

This talk will discuss self-assembled peptide and protein biomaterials for raising therapeutic immune responses. Projects dealing with designing adjuvant-free vaccines and immunotherapies for chronic inflammation will be described. These materials are designed in a modular style, allowing various immune phenotypes to be specifically targeted.

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Abstract, 11/3/2014
Bioactive materials for transitioning macrophage and fibroblast phenotypes within chronic vocal fold scar

Susan Thibeault, PhD, CCC-SLP

Vocal fold scarring is a debilitation condition that has proven difficult to treat with current surgical techniques or standard injectable fillers. The long term aim of our work is to engineer injectable products that promote wound repair and induce tissue regeneration to treat chronic vocal fold scarring and other extracellular matrix (ECM) defects of the lamina propria. Using PEGDA cytokine hydrogels previously identified as anti-fibrotic and/or immunomodulatory, we will harness the capacity of implanted materials to modulate the phenotype of invading macrophages and vocal fold fibroblasts toward achieving improved restoration of chronic vocal fold scar.

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Abstract, 11/17/2014
Modeling liver disease and development with human iPSCs
Stephen A. Duncan, DPhil

We have previously described a procedure for the efficient differentiation of human iPSCs to cells that display hepatocyte characteristics. Here we report the use of such a system to model inborn errors of hepatic metabolism and to understand the molecule basis of hepatocyte differentiation.

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Abstract, 12/1/2014
Listening to small molecule cellular signaling with micrometabolomics

Ashleigh Theberge, Ph.D.

Small molecule signals provide a rich vocabulary for cellular communication across kingdoms - from bacteria and fungi to mammalian cells. While methods to query expression of proteins and nucleic acids in cell culture systems are well developed, small molecules remain elusive to identify and study. These barriers are principally explained by (1) the sensitivity of small molecule production to culture environments requiring the use of primary cells and physiologically relevant culture systems and (2) the lack of efficient sample preparation platforms to interface culture models with analytical chemistry tools such as mass spectrometry. We have developed a new type of microfluidic systems, called "suspended microfluidics", that allows biphasic flows in a microdevice controlled by simple pipettes. These novel systems enable the creation of microscale platforms for cell culture that integrate small molecule extraction for downstream metabolomic analysis and accommodate the culture of multiple cell types in connected microfabricated compartments. We have also engineered functional readouts, such as assays for blood vessel formation, into our microculture models, enabling us to establish links between metabolomic profiles and biological function. These microfluidic models show great potential for disentangling complex relationships among cell types – in both normal and disease states – and understanding the chemistry responsible for these interactions.


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