University of Wisconsin Madison College of Engineering

Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series

The Dept. of Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series consists of presentations on current research topics of interest to biomedical engineering graduate students and faculty by on-campus and visiting engineers and scientists.


Seminars are on Mondays at noon in the Tong Auditorium (Room 1003 Engineering Centers Building, 1550 Engineering Drive) unless otherwise indicated.


Biomedical Engineering Fall 2015 Seminar Program

 

Date

Topic

Speaker

Monday
9/21/2015

Integration of Systems Biology, Tissue Engineering, and Microdevices for Drug Development
(Abstract)

Linda Griffith, Ph.D.
S.E.T.I. Professor
Dept. of Biological and Mechanical Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Monday
9/28/2015

The Impact of Cellular Network and Microenvironmental Variations in Disease
(Abstract)

Pam Kreeger, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. Biomedical Engineering
UW-Madison

Monday
10/5/2015

TBA
(Abstract)

David Kaplan, Ph.D.
Stern Family Professor of Engineering
Professor and Chair
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
Tufts University

Monday
10/12/2015

The Role of the Scientist in the Clinic: A Medical Physicist’s Perspective
(Abstract)

Timothy Szczykutowicz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Radiology and Medical Physics
UW–Madison

Monday
10/19/2015

Information Intensive Guided Therapy: Moving Beyond Tracking Surgical Devices to Tracking Therapy
(Abstract)

Walter Block, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering
UW–Madison

Monday
11/2/2015

Polymer Coatings for Cell Culture Studies
(Abstract)

Padma Gopalan, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Material Science and Engineering
UW–Madison

Monday
11/9/2015

Engineering Materials for Functional Nerve Regeneration
(Abstract)

Christine Schmidt, Ph.D.
Pruitt Family Professor & Chair
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
University of Florida

Monday
11/23/2015

Monolayer Elasticity in Collective Cell Migration
(Abstract)

Jacob Notbohm, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Engineering Physics
UW–Madison

Monday
12/7/2015

Development and validation of MRI-based quantitative imaging biomarkers
(Abstract)

Diego Hernando, Ph.D.
Assistant Scientist
Dept. of Radiology
UW–Madison

 

 

Abstract, 9/21/2015
Integration of Systems Biology, Tissue Engineering, and Microdevices for Drug Development

Linda Griffith, Ph.D.

"Mice are not little people" – a refrain becoming louder in the drug development community, as the strengths and weaknesses of rodent models of human disease become more apparent. At the same time, three emerging approaches are headed toward integration: powerful systems biology analysis of cell signaling networks on patient samples; 3D tissue engineered models of human organ systems, often made from stem cells; and microfluidic devices that enable living systems to be sustained and used for models like cancer metastasis. This talk will highlight the integration of these rapidly moving fields to understand difficult clinical problems including cancer metastasis and women's reproductive health.

Top of page


Abstract, 9/28/2015
The Impact of Cellular Network and Microenvironmental Variations in Disease

Pam Kreeger, Ph.D.

Cellular behavior results from the complex interplay between the cell and influences from the surrounding microenvironment (e.g., extracellular matrix, growth factors). Overlaid on this already complex relationship is the reality that different cells (e.g., different cell types, cells from different patients) have variation in their internal cell network that impact processing of these inputs into decisions. To analyze questions about these relationships, my lab utilizes computational modeling and develops biomimetic in vitro models. In this talk, I will discuss our ongoing efforts to use these methods in cancer and wound healing.

Top of page


Abstract, 10/5/2015
Title: TBA

David Kaplan, Ph.D.

Abstract: TBA

Top of page


Abstract, 10/12/2015
The Role of the Scientist in the Clinic: A Medical Physicist's Perspective

Timothy Szczykutowicz, Ph.D.

A brief overview of imaging and therapy technologies commonly used in radiology and radiation oncology departments across the globe will be given. Then, an overview of the work of the presenter in the area of computed tomography (CT) focusing on current research related to monitoring image quality, CT protocol optimization, and the clinical workflow will be covered. The seminar will cover professional and scientific aspects of the role of a medical physicist in a university hospital setting. The presenter currently mentors multiple UW-Madison BME undergraduates and hopes this seminar will expose more engineering students to the possibilities a future in medical imaging could offer.

Top of page


Abstract, 10/19/2015
Information Intensive Guided Therapy: Moving Beyond Tracking Surgical Devices to Tracking Therapy

Walter Block, Ph.D.

The brunt of image-guidance used in surgery today is still provided by co-registering anatomical images from pre-operative diagnostic imaging with the geometric space of the operating room. This approach is somewhat akin to printing out turn by turn driving directions before you leave the house. You will have a good idea of where you are going, but traffic, accidents, and state troopers will still surprise you. This seminar will sow how real-time imaging during surgical procedures can provide information that not only tracks devices, but allows interventionists to quantitatively track treatments precisely as they are administered. Applications in cancer therapy, gene therapy, and stem cell delivery will be shown.

Top of page


Abstract, 11/2/2015
Polymer Coatings for Cell Culture Studies

Padma Gopalan, Ph.D.

Chemically defined synthetic surfaces play an important role in understanding stem cell behavior. We have developed a chemically defined ultra-thin coatings that is stable over timeframes relevant to differentiation of hMSCs. The coating consists of a copolymer, which incorporates orthogonal chemistry for the crosslinking and peptide binding. The orthogonal chemistry allows for (i) substrate adaptability, (ii) scalability over large areas, (ii) absolute quantification of peptides, (iv) chemically defined passage of hMSCs, (v) stability of peptide-polymer bonds, and (vi) long-term coating stability. This coating platform can potentially elucidate cell-material interactions in vitro and have far-reaching effects on stem cell culture methods. I will specifically talk about how recent advances in materials science characterization tools such a X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) can be leveraged for precise quantification of these soft templates.

Top of page


Abstract, 11/9/2015
Engineering Materials for Functional Nerve Regeneration

Christine Schmidt, Ph.D.

Damage to spinal cord and peripheral nerve tissue can have a devastating impact on the quality of life for individuals suffering from nerve injuries. Our research is focused on analyzing and designing biomaterials that can interface with neurons and specifically stimulate and guide nerves to regenerate. These biomaterials might be required for facial and hand reconstruction or in trauma cases, and potentially could be used to aid the regeneration of damaged spinal cord.

New technologies to aid nerve regeneration will ultimately require that biomaterials be designed both to physically support tissue growth as well as to elicit desired receptor-specific responses from particular cell types. One way of achieving such interactive biomaterials is with the use of natural-based biomaterials that interact favorable with the body. In particular, our research has focused on developing advanced hyaluronan-based scaffolds that can be used for peripheral and spinal nerve regeneration applications. Hyaluronic acid (HA; also known as hyaluronan) is a non-sulfated, high molecular weight, glycosaminoglycan found in all mammals and is a major component of the extracellular matrix in the nervous system. HA has been shown to play a significant role during embryonic development, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and, most importantly for our purposes, in wound healing and tissue regeneration. HA is a versatile biomaterial that has been used in a number of applications including tissue engineering scaffolds, clinical therapies, and drug delivery devices. Our group has devised novel techniques to process this sugar material into forms that can be used in therapeutic applications. For example, we are using advanced laser-based processes to create "lines" of specific proteins within the hyaluronan materials to provide physical and chemical guidance features for the individual re-growing axons. We have found that these materials facilitate neuron interactions and are thus highly promising for regenerating peripheral and spinal nerves in vivo.

In a parallel approach to foster nerve regeneration, our group has developed natural tissue scaffolds termed "acellular tissue grafts" created by chemical processing of normal intact nerve tissue. These grafts are created from natural biological tissue -- human cadaver nerves -- and are chemically processed so that they do not cause an immune response and are therefore not rejected in patients. These grafts have been optimized to maintain the natural intricate architecture of the nerve pathways, and thus, they are ideal for promoting the re-growth of damaged axons across lesions. These engineered, biological nerve grafts are currently used in the clinic for peripheral nerve injuries and are being explored for spinal cord regeneration.

Top of page


Abstract, 11/23/2015
Monolayer Elasticity in Collective Cell Migration

Jacob Notbohm, Ph.D.

Monolayers of collectively migrating cells are a common model system for studying wound healing, embryonic development and cancer metastasis. The cooperative motions are assumed to be driven by active forces applied by each cell, but there is still no known relationship to connect the forces to the flow of the cellular collective. This talk will describe a spring-like elastic relationship between force and motion within the monolayer. It will be demonstrated how the elasticity can generate emergent phenomena, such as collective waves of cellular motion that propagate across the monolayer.

Top of page


Abstract, 12/7/2015
Development and validation of MRI-based quantitative imaging biomarkers

Diego Hernando, Ph.D.

The ability to use imaging to quantify relevant physical parameters (ie: quantitative imaging biomarkers) has the potential to enable improved diagnosis and treatment monitoring of multiple diseases. However, development and validation of quantitative imaging techniques present important challenges beyond those of traditional qualitative imaging. These challenges often include: increased imaging time, ill-posed estimation problems, and unwanted signal contributions due to the presence of multiple confounding factors. In order to overcome these challenges, engineering solutions are needed, which encompass both signal acquisition and image reconstruction. Further, quantitative imaging biomarkers should be accurate, precise, robust and reproducible, and comprehensive validation is required in order to translate these techniques into clinical use. In this seminar, I will describe recent efforts undertaken in collaboration with several Departments at UW-Madison to develop and validate MRI-based quantitative imaging biomarkers. This research seminar will focus on MRI techniques to quantify fat and iron concentration in tissue, including their applications, recent developments, and remaining open questions.

Top of page